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Full text of "Pomphrey's directory of Wishaw and handbook of the parish of Cambusnethan : with Shotts supplement"

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GLASFORDl 



National Library of Scotland 

minium iiiiii nun 

*B000049333* 



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____ 

POMPHREYS 

DIRECTORY of WISHAW 



HANDBOOK 

OF THE PARISH OF CAMBUSNETHAN, 

!8iff) <5^>offs <pupplemei\L 



THIED ETDITIOHST. 



k 



WISH A W : 

printed and published by \v. pomphrey, 
"press" office. 



SLOTH, 1- 



Jl s s u r a xi c c gompani?. 

(ESTABLISHED 1837.) 



Chairman, - Sir ANDREW LUSK, Bart. 
LIFE, ANNUITIES, and LOANS. 

Subscribed Capital, - ;£i, 000,000 

Accumulated Assets, .... 1,403,000 

Annual Income, ----- 363,000 

Total Claims Paid, 3,408,631 

Amount of Life Assurances in Force, - 5,142,628 

INV ESTMENT ASSURANCE. TllE ^S fl7/ Icn f ? 

specially asked to the Endowment 
Scheme, whereby a person aged 24 next birthday, for an Annual 
Premium of Three Guineas, can secure £lO0 and a share in the 
profits of the Company's business to his heirs, in the event of death : 
or if he live to the age of 55, the £100, together with the Bonuses 
which shall have been added, are payable to himself. In other words, 
if the assured live to attain the age specified in the Policy, all his 
Premiums are returned to him, together with a fair interest thereon ; 
and, in addition, there is this further advantage about investing in a 
Life Policy, that immediately the first premium is paid, the Company 
is liable, on death occurring, for the sum assured, and for any 
profits which may have accrued. 

IRew feature : Double Benefit policies. 

SUM ASSURED PAID TWICE : On attaining a 
Specified Age, and again at death. 

ISP" TWO POLICIES INSTEAD OF ONE. ^ 

{(1) Cash Payment of Policy Due ; 
(2) Annuity in addition to the Policy 
payable at Death ; or 
(3) Considerable Increase in the Sum 
to be payable at Death. 
If unable to keep up Policy, Assured is held covered for exact proportion of Sum 
originally bargained for, corresponding with the number of Premiums paid in. 

Application for Agencies Invited. 
For Prospectuses and Further Information apply to the 

Glasgow Branch : 141 WEST GEORGE STREET, 

J. R. SANDILANDS, Local Manager. 

t IVishaw— WM. POMPHREY, Post-Office Buildings. 



Everything for the Garden. 

SEEDS. Vegetable and Flower Seeds. Every care is 
taken by us to secure the best quality of these, as 
regards strain, growth, and suitability to the district. 
All Seeds tested in the Nursery before they are sent out. 

VEGETABLE PLANTS. Such as Cauliflower, 
Cabbage, Savoys, Greens, Brussels Sprouts, Leeks, 
Celery, Parsley, &c. All grown and kept in their season. 

FLOWER PLANTS. We make a specialty of 
Bedding Plants, and they give every satisfaction. Stocks, 
Asters, Marigolds, Antirrhinums, Penstemons, Dahlias, 
Carnations, Calceolarias, Pansies, Violas, at most 
moderate prices. 

BULBS. Hyacinth, Crocus, Snowdrop, Tulip, &c, &c, 
for sale from October till end of their season. 

SUNDRIES. Flower Pots, Matting, Tobacco Paper, 
Flower Sticks and Tallies. Fertilizers, and all other 
Sundries always in Stock. 

BIRD SEED. A fine Stock of best Spanish Canary 
always on hand. Capern's, Welham's, and Hyde's 
Specialities. All kinds of bird foods and requisites kept. 

CUT FLOWERS. Fresh Cut Flowers kept 
constantly. Natural Flower Wreaths made to order. 
Artifical Wreaths kept in great variety. 




POST-OFFICE BUILDINGS, 

(NURSERY-CALEDONIAN ROAD,) 
"W^ ISHA "W. 



JAMES SOM.MERVILLE, 

TJJBofeeafe oni QRefaif 3ronmonget, 

STANE, SHOTTS. 

■♦-<»-» 

Contractor for Wire Fencing of every 
description. 

AGENT FOR THE FAMOUS 
NEW HOWE BICYCLES, 

AND FOR 

REAPING & MOWING MACHINES. 

Price- List oji application for eveiy thing 
connected with the trade. 

BICYCLES, 

TRICYCLES, 
SEWING MACHINES, 

By all the Leading Makers. 



obeft Wat t, 

CALDERHEAD, SHOTTS. 
Branch — Baillie's Causeway, Hamilton. 

fiX3RIKrG &.TX1> 3R3B3PiiI3K.I]Sr<3-. 



POMPHREY'S 

DIRECTORY of WlSflAW 

AND 

HANDBOOK 

OF THE PARISH OF CAMBUSNETHAN, 

"g5U^> gooffs Supplement 



TIHIIIRID IBIDITIOIN". 



WISHAW 



PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY W. POMPHREY, 
" PRESS " OFFICE. 



PREFATORY NOTE. 



'^T'HE two previous issues of the Wishaw Directory and 
^^ Handbook — one published in 1882, and the other in 1887 — 
having been long out of print, a new and revised edition has been 
felt to be urgently needed. During the last six years the population 
of the town and parish has greatly increased, and there has been a 
marked growth in the industries of the district. These changes 
have been dealt with specially in this edition of the Directory, 
and the local and parochial lists have been materially extended and 
carefully revised to date. The historical sketches and other articles 
of permanent value which appeared in last issue have been supple- 
mented and reproduced. 



" Press" Office, 
Wishaw, June, 1893. 



CONTENTS. 



I. Historical Sketches — Parish of Cambusnethan, - 

The Celts of Strathclyde, .... 
The Romans in the Wilds of Clydesdale, 
The Line of the great Roman Road in Cambusnethan, 
The Parish in the Feudal Period, 
The Monks of Kelso and Garion Mill, - • 

"Chapel" — The Tower of Garion, 
Archbishop Leighton and the "Disputatious" Coltness 
Laird, ..... 

The Ancient Kirk of Cam'nethan and its Ministers, 

The Covenanters of the Parish, - 

The Old Families of the Parish, - 

The Progress of Wishaw, .... 

II. Historical Sketches — Shotts Parish, 

III. Belhaven and Stenton Peerage, 

IV. Summer Drives, • 

1. Tillietudlem, ..... 

2. Lanark and the Falls of Clyde, 

3. Douglas Kirk and Castle, ... 

4. Loudon Hill and Drumclog, 

5. Both well — The Bridge, the Kirk, the Castle, &c, 

6. Hamilton Palace, the Mausoleum, Cadzow Castle, 

Cadzow Forest, the White Cattle, 

7. Tinto, ..... 

V. Industries of the District, 

VI. Local Information, 

Wishaw Post-Office, 

Miners' Wages per day from 1848 to 1893, 

Rainfall, 1880-92, .... 

List of Magistrates and Police Commissioners since 

formation of Burgh, 
Census of the Parish of Cambusnethan, - 
List of Societies, &c. , 

VII. Directory List, .... 



Page 

7 



COLLINS' SCIENCE TEXT-BOOKS. 



ELEMENTA 
Practical Plane and Solid Geometry. 

By H. Angel, Islington Science School, 

London. Is 6d. 
Machine Construction and Drawing. By 

E. Tompkins. Vol. I. Tjxt, Is. Vol. 

II. Plates, Is. 
Elementary Mathematics. A Complete 

Course of Practical Arithmetic, with 

Algebra and Euclid. 2s. 
Dynamics. By J. T. Bottomley, Is. 6d. 
Hydrostatics. By J. T. Bottomley, Is. 6d. 
Dynamics and Hydrostatics, 1 vol. By 

J. T. Bottomley. 3s. 
Applied Mechanics. By H. Evers, LL.D. 

ls.6d. 
Acoustics, Light, and Heat. By Win. 

Lees, M.A. Is. 6d. 
Magnetism and Electricity. By J. 

Angell, F.C.S. 2s. Enlarged Edition. 
Inorganic Chemistry. By Dr. W. B. 

Kemshead, F.R.G.S., F.A.S. 2j. 
Inorganic Chemistry, Lessons in. By 

W. G. Valentin, F C.S. 2s. 
Organic Chemistry. By VV.M Watts. Is. 
Practical Chemistry. ' By J. Howard, 

F.C.S. Is. 6d. 

ADVANCE 

Practical Plain Geometry and Projec- 
tion. By H. Angell, Islington Science 
School, London. Vol. I. Text, 4s. ' Vol. 
II. Plates, 6s. 

Machine Construction. By E. Tomkins. 
Edited by Henry Evers, LL.D. Vol. I. 
Text, 3s. 6d. Vol. II. Plates, 7s. 

Building Construction — Stone and 
Brick. Bv R. S. Burn, C.E. Vol. I. 
Text, 2s. 6d. Vol. II. Plates, 5s. 

Pure Mathematics, including Arithme- 
tic, Algebra, Geometry, and Plane Tri- 
gonometry. By Edward Atkins, B. Sc. 
(Lond.), Leicester. Vol. I. 2s. 6d. 

Pure Mathematics, including the higher 
parts of Algebra and Plane Trigonome- 
try, together with Elementary and 
Spherical Trigonometry. By Edward 
Atkins, B.Sc. (Lond.), Leicester. Vol. 
II. 2s. 6d. 

Acoustics, Light, and Heat. By Wm. 
Lees, M.A., Edinburgh. 3s. 

Animal Physiology. By J. Cleland, 
M.D., LL.D., Professor of Anatomy, 
Glasgow University. 2s. 6d. 



RY SERIES. 

Geology. By W. S. Davis, LL.D. Is. 
! Mineralogy. By J. H.Collins.F.G.S. Is. 

Animal Physiology. By J. Angell, 
F.C.S., F.I.C. Is. 6d. 
| Botany — Anatomy and Physiology of 
Plants. By Prof. Balfour. Is. 

Botany — Systematic and Economic. By 
Prof. Balfour. Is. 

General Biology. 124 Illustrations. By 
T. C. MacGinley. Is. 6d. 

Zooloqy. By M. Harrison. Is. 

Principles ok Coal Mining. By J. H. 
Collins, F.G.S. Is. 

Principles of Metal Mining. New Edi- 
tion. By I. H. Collins, F.G.S, ls.6d. 

Steam and the Steam Engine— Land and 
Marine. By H. Evers, LL.D. Is. 

Physical Geography. Bv John Mac- 
Turk, F.R.G.S. Is. 

Agricultural Text-Book. By Professor 
Wrightson. 2s. Od. 

Dietetics. By E.F. Willoughhy, M.B. Is. 

Sanitary Science. By R. S. Burn. Is. 6d. 

Astronomy. By J. I. Plummer. Is. 

Physiology. By Hugh Dickie, LL.D. 
With numerous Illustrations. Is. 6d. 

D SERIES. 

Magnetism and Electricity. By F. 
Guthrie, B.A., Ph.D. 3s. 6d. 

InorganicChemistry — Vol. I. Non-Metals. 
By Professor Thorpe, Ph.D., F.R.S. 3s. 

Inorganic Chemistry — Vol. II. Metals. 
By Professor Thorpe, Ph.D., F.R.S. 3s. 

Mineralogy. Vol. I., General Principles. 
By J. H. Collins, F.G.S. 3s. 

Mineralogy. Vol. II., Systematic and De- 
scriptive. By J. H. Collins,F.G.S. 3s. 

Metallurgy — Vol. I. Fuel, Iron, Steel, 
Tin, Antimony, Arsenic, Bismuth, and 
Platinum. By W. H. Greenwood, 
F.C.S., A.R.S.M. 3s. 6d. 

Metallurgy' — Vol. II. Copper, Lead, 
Zinc, Mercury, Silver, Gold, Nickle, 
Cobalt, and Aluminium. By W. H. 
Greenwood, F.C.S., A.R.S.M. 3s. 

Steam and the Steam Engine — Land, 
Marine, and Locomotive. By Henry 
Evers, LL.D., Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 
3s. 

Physical Geography. By John Young, 
M.D., F.G.S., Professor of Natural 
History, Glasgow University. 2s. 6d. 



ART SERIES. 

Practical Plane Geometry, with 71 Plates, and Letterpress Description. By E. S. 
Burchett, National Art Training School, South Kensington, etc. Royal 8vo, 
Cloth. 5s. 



WM. 'COLLINS, SONS, & CO., Limited, Glasgow and London. 



Historical Sketches of Cambusnctban 
ano Sbotts. 



No better guarantee of QUALITY and VALUE can be given than 
the fact that about every Eighteenth Bottle of Wine, and every 
Fortieth Bottle of Spirits, consumed in the United Kingdom, are 
supplied from W. & A. Gilbey's Stock. This statement is based 
upon the Government Returns. 



W\ & A. QI L B E Y, 

Wine Growers and Shippers, Distillers and Rectifiers. 



SPANISH PORT 
SPANISH PORT 
SPANISH PORT 
SPANISH PORT 



PORTS FROM SPAIN. 

Mark. Age. Colour. Description. Bot. Doz. 

Castle 1 3 years Full A good Fruity Wine Is 3d 15s 

Castle 2 4 years Full A fine Fruity Wine Is 6d 18s 

Castle 3 5 years Full A choice Vintage Wine Is 9d 21s 

Castle 4 very old Light A choice dry tawny Wine Is lOd 22s 



PORTS FROM PORTUGAL — OLD IN WOOD. 



INVALID PORT 

PORT 

PORT 

PORT 

PORT 

PORT 

PORT 



Mark. 

Castle A 
Castle B 
Castle C 
Castle E 
Castle G 
Castle J 



Age in 

Wood. Colour. Description. Bot. Doz. 

4 years Light. A very nourishing Wine 2s 6d 30s 

3 years Full A good Fruity Wine 2s Od 24s 

6 years Full A good Fruity Wine 2s 4d 



SHERRY 
SHERRY 
SHERRY 
SHERRY 



CLARET 
CLARET 
CLARET 



9 years Medium An excellent Fruity Wine 2s lOd 34s 

Medium A well matured fruity Wine 3s 4d 40s 

Medium A fruity Wine of great age 4s Od 48s 

very light A very old choice dry Wine 4s 6d 54s 

SHERRIES FROM SPAIN. 
Mark. Age. Colour. Description. Bot. Doz. 

Castle Spanish 3 years Pale ("Spanish Wines of excel- "| Is Od 12s 
Castle 2A 4 years Gold J. lent character suitable >ls 3d 15s 

Castle A A 6 yews Gold I, for all general purposes ) Is 6d 18s 

Castle CC 9 years Gold A fine nutty Sherry 2s Od 24a 

CLARETS. 

Mark. Age in Bottle. Description. Bot. Doz. 

Castle A 6 months A good, sound beverage Wine Is Od 12s 

Castle C 18 months A superior Medoc Wine Is 6d 18s 

Castle E old in bottle A dessert Wine with good bouquet 2s 6d 30s 



SPARKLING SAUMUR CHAMPAGNES, 



Per Bottle, 2s 3d, 2s 8d, 2s lid. 



SCOTCH WHISKIES. 

Mark. Strength. Description. Bot. Doz. 

SCOTCH WHISKY Castle S38 38 under proof ( Fine Scotch malt whis-"| 2s Od 24s 

SCOTCH WHISKY Castle S21 21 under proof { kies, varying in price >2s 6d 30s 

SCOTCH WHISKY Castle S 14 under proof (according to strength J 2s lid 35s 

f Castle \ , , „„j-_ „„„_* / Finest & oldest High- 1,. M i 9 , 

Grand | 1* under proof j land Whisky } 3s M 42s 



SCOTCH WHISKY 



Mark. 
Castle F 
Castle FO 
Castle Grand 



COGNAC BRANDIES. 

Strength. Colour. 
14 under proof Pale 

21 under proof Pale 

21 under proof Pale 



Bot. Doz. 
4s 6d 54s 
5s Od 60s 
5s 3d 63s 



COGNAC 
COGNAC 
COGNAC 
For other descriptions of Wines and Spirits see W. & A. Gilbey's Complete List. 

WM. BUCHANAN, Grocer, West-End Cross. 




HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



I.-CAMBUSNETHAN. 

HE early history of this Parish is involved in obscurity, 
and can only be elucidated by a study of the early 
history of Scotland, and, indeed, of the Island of 
Great Britain. The name carries us back to a 
time when the country was covered by the primeval forest, and 
inhabited by the Celtic race. According to the most recent 
discoveries, Britain, when the Romans entered it, was populated by 
three distinct races. These were the aboriginals, non-Celtic inhab- 
itants, who, at a period anterior to all written documents, had been 
conquered and driven into remote corners of the Island by a Celtic 
race called Goidels, Gaidhels, or Gaels. They in turn had been 
displaced over a large portion of the country by another Celtic race 
called the Brythons — the Brittones of the Roman historians. The 
Goidels were still predominant in Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the 
Highlands in Scotland ; while the Brythons, the latest arrival from 
Gaul, occupied Wales, Cumbria, including Clydesdale, and Cornwall. 
The Scots in Argyleshire were Goidels from Ireland. The Picts in 
the north of the island are supposed to have been the aboriginal 
non-Celtic race, although the name was applied to Celtic tribes 
farther south. Druidism seems to have been the religion of the 
aborigines. The Goidels combined Druidism with the Polytheism 
of their Aryan ancestors, which had been transported by them from 
India to Europe. But the Brythons seem to have been Polytheists 
pure and simple, after the fashion of the Greeks and Romans and 
other branches of the great Indo-European family. Every locality, 
river, and fountain had its deity. The Celts of Clydesdale were 
Brythons, although doubtless intermingled with the aboriginal 
race, and perhaps with their Goidelic kinsmen. Lanark is derived 
by some from the Welsh word Llannerch, signifying a stop of level 
ground, or a vale ; but some derive it from Lan-aerig, which means 
the bank of a river. It was inhabited by a Brythonic tribe called 



8 

by the Romans Dumnonii, whose territory extended to the borders 
of the great Caledonian Forest in the north. Now, what we know 
of these Celtic tribes throws light upon the pre-historic period in 
Clydesdale, and, consequently, in the parish of Cambusnethan, 
which signifies the curve or bending of the Nethan, where the Clyde 
bends round the fertile valley land. So Cambuslang means " the 
long bend." Nethan, or Nechtan, was a Pictish king, who dates 
about a.d. 706, and whose capital was Abernethy, said to mean 
"the Work of Nethan " — Obair or Abair Nadchtain — while others 
make Scone the capital. At all events, it was at Scone, in a.d. 710, 
that he sought to impose the Roman tonsure and other Roman 
customs upon the native clergy, and he is said to have become a 
cleric in a.d. 724. At the beginning of the eighth century, the 
northern part of Clydesdale belonged to this monarch, and the 
Clyde was the southern boundary of his kingdom. But the reader 
must be warned that the history of this period is wrapped in 
obscurity, and the authorities differ considerably in their deduc- 
tions from the few and scanty facts at their disposal. It 
is possible, but by no means certain, that the parish derives its 
name from this royal saint, to whom the old church is said to have 
been dedicated. Clydesdale formed part of the kingdom of Cumbria, 
which at one time extended from Carlisle to Alclud, also called 
Dunbrettan, or the fortress of the Brythons — now Dumbarton. 
The Strath - Clyde Welshmen are mentioned in the Saxon 
chronicle. Cumbria was annexed to the Scottish Crown in 
1124, but the Cumbrians and Tweeddale men formed a distinct 
battalion at the Battle of the Standard in 1130, and the Welsh 
or Brythonic dialect lingered in certain districts till the four- 
teenth century. And now what we know from other sources 
of those Brythons will enable us to sketch briefly the conditions of 
life long ago in Cambusnethan and neighbourhood. In the Stone 
Age, as it is called, they navigated the Clyde in canoes hewed or 
burned out of the solid oak ; the warrior was buried in a rude stone 
coffin, covered with a cairn — their arrow-heads of flint, which were 
tied to a reed by a slip of skin, are occassionally found in the lonely 
moors which they traversed. The houses were pits dug in the 
earth, and roofed with stone or turf. Sometimes they inhabited 
underground structures built with great stones which overlapped 
each other till the space was narrowed so as to be covered with a 
single block. Around these ancient sites are found the bones of the 
sheep, oxen, and deer that they devoured, and stone basins and 
mortars, necklaces of stone beads, the teeth of animals, or cockle 
shells, and pins made of horn. Their ideas of the Future State 
resembled those of the American Indians. The warrior was supplied 
in his tomb with flint flakes that he might not want arrow-heads in 
the happy hunting grounds of the unseen world ; his cup and bowl 
were buried with him that he might share in the banquet with the 
mighty dead ; and rude urns filled with calcined ashes indicate that 
some of his vassals were slaughtered at the funeral to furnish him 
with attendants. In the Bronze Age, they made their daggers, 



9 

swords, and axe-heads of this metal. One sword was discovered 
fashioned gracefully like a myrtle leaf, and indicating considerable 
artistic skill. They had also collars of twisted gold, and used rings 
of gold and bronze for money. Civilisation was now advancing, and 
when the Romans arrived the Brythons of the south of England had 
reached the Iron age — so that they could not have been savages of 
the lowest type — and they had begun to coin money about B.C. 200. 
The B^'thons who settled in Clydesdale must have passed through 
these stages. The Romans arrived in b.c. 55, but it was a.d. 80 
before they attempted the subjugation of the wild Caledonians of 
the North. By-aud-by, they penetrated into the wilds of Clydes- 
dale, which formed part of the province of Valentia, and remains of 
their roads and camps are to be found at Dalziel, BofchwelJ, and 
other places. The tramp of the legions must have been heard for 
the first time on one memorable day in Cambusnethan, and the 
astonished Brythons gazed upon the Roman arms and standards, aud 
heard the strange accents of the Latin tongue. A part of the great 
Roman Road entered this parish between Shieldmuir and Meadow- 
head, and passed Wishaw midway between the town and the Cale- 
donian Railway, crossed Garrion Gill, and ran through Carluke to 
Carlisle. Another branch ran northwards to the west of Newmains, 
crossing the Calder at a hollow part midway between Murdostoun 
and the Stirling Road, and thence in a straight line to Castlecary, 
where was a Roman fort. History does not record what reception 
they got in this parish. Doubtless they found the natives armed 
with the small round shields, and long, heavy, pointless swords, 
which proved so unavailing before the disciplined onslaught of the 
legions at the battles of Ardoch and elsewhere, and it is possible that 
some of the local warriors tried conclusions with the Roman troops. 
The Romans left the island in a.d. 422, and then the Northern Picts 
began to swarm over the wall of Antoninus, which extended 
for thirty-six miles between Grangemouth on the Forth and Old 
Kirkpatrick on the Clyde. We know that in the middle of the 
eighth century they were at war with the Dalriadic Scots, and Alpin, 
the Scottish King, was attacking t he Picts of Manaw — the modern 
Slamannan — who had rebelled against the King of Northumbria, a 
monarch who had a good deal to say in Scottish matters at that time. 
And there was a battle royal between the Picts of Galloway and the 
Cumbrians in 750. In short, chaos had come again, and lasted till 
the Scots of Argyle got the upper hand of them all, and in a.d. S43 
Kenneth mac Alpin, King of the Scots, became king of North 
Britain, and the Lia Fail, or Stone of Destiny, which had been 
brought from Ireland to Iona, was carried to Scone. The Danes, 
too, had a finger in the pie, and contributed not a little to the 
anarchy of the times. They often sailed up the Clyde, plundering 
and devastating all within their reach — although they have not left 
such deep traces of their presence in Clydesdale as in other parts of 
the kingdom. At that time the Debatable Land extended to the 
fortress of Edinburgh, or Edwinsburgh, and it took many a long and 
bloody battle before, the English invaders were driven beyond the 



10 

Tweed. In all these matters, the chiefs and warriors, the barons, 
vassals, and clergy of Canibusnethan must have had a deep interest, 
and so we come to the Feudal Period, when Canibusnethan emerges 
into the light of history. Here, too, we must go to the general 
history of the kingdom for the details of social and military life to 
understand how the Finnemunds, and the De Clers, and the barons 
who came after them in the manor of Cam'nethan, ordered their 
lives and the lives of their vassals. It was a stirring, picturesque 
period. We can see with the eyes of imagination the old barons 
clad in iron, with blazoned shield and lance and sword, with the 
pennon borne before them, followed by retainers in iron cap and 
quilted leathern jacket (quilted with iron), armed with axe, spear, 
and dagger. We are familiar with the old towers, built often on 
islands or in the centre of a morass and, for obvious reasons, 
encircled by a moat. Within was the big vaulted hall, where the 
men-at-arms feasted on stolen beef, and passed round the black jack 
filled with mighty ale, while the dogs fought for the bones on the 
floor covered with rushes for a carpet. It is probable that the 
feudal barons of Cambusnethan were more civilized than those of the 
borders, although they had all the ferocity of their class. A great 
part of the population were serfs, bound to stay on the land like so 
many oxen, over whom the baron had power of life and death, in 
token of which the Dule Tree, or Tree of Sorrow was erected at his 
gates, and was seldom without a ghastly burden. It is now that 
Cam'nethan begins to figure in charters and other historical docu- 
ments. In a.d. 1116, David, Prince of Cumbria, held an inquest to 
ascertain what lands and churches belonged to the diocese of 
Glasgow. In the diocesan register occurs a name Camcachethyn or 
Camnachethyn, conjectured to be Cambusnethan, At all events, in 
1232, Cam'nethan is mentioned in a charter as a parish within 
the limits of Glasgow diocese. In the 12th century, William 
Finnemund, a Norman baron, was lord of the manor, and gave to 
Kelso Abbey the tithes and other rights over the soil. He was 
followed by Rudolph de Cler, who, for the privilege of having a 
private chapel in his manor-house dedicated to Saint Michael, gave 
the monks of Kelso the right of grinding their corn at Garion Mill, 
and the tithe of all the multure of said mill. In the end of the 
thirteenth century, the kirk of Cam'nethan became one of the 
mensal kirks of the See of Glasgow for the maintenance of the 
Bishop's table. After the Reformation, the revenues of the Church 
lands were granted to various laymen, and bestowed at last on the 
lord of the manor. The central part of the parish belonged some 
four or five hundred years ago to the Abbacy of Aberbrothic. This 
district was called MacMorren's Muir, afterwards Allcathmuir. In 
1433, the baron paid to the abbey 40 merks annually, and half-a- 
stone of wax for altar use on the eve of the Feast of John the 
Baptist. In 1528, John, Lord Hay of Yester, possessed the lands, and 
he was ancestor of the Marquis of Tweeddale. There was a chapel 
at Beuskiag, which has long since disappeared, although it has left 
traces of its existence in the name " Chapel," still given to a part of 



11 

the district. The Tower of Garion, originally an old feudal 
portalice, has an ecclesiastical connection. It was the summer 
residence of the Archbishops of Glasgow, from James Blaekadder 
iu 1484 to Paterson, who died in Edinburgh in 1703, when bishops 
had become a thing of the past. Leigh ton, the best and purest of 
them all, must have sojourned here and preached in the old church. 
It is on record that he had many discussions with the laird of Colt- 
ness, who was a strong Presbyterian ; and on one occasion they 
waxed so hot that Leighton said he wished he had stayed at home 
and " chewed gravel," rather than have accepted the invitation to 
dinner. The old church has long since fallen into ruins. A portion 
of the old wall surrounds the sepulchre of the Belhavens, and the 
outlines of the west church are still discernible. John Lyndesay 
was curate in 1552, and likely sang his last mass some time 
in 1560. Then came the Protestant regime. Vestments, altars, 
vessels, and service books were burnt or sold, and a reader 
took the place of the parish priest, who read Knox's liturgy 
from the lectern or lettern — the only piece of old church furniture 
which survived. One of the early ministers was a Muirhead of 
Lauchop, another a Hamilton of Broom hill, showing that the upper 
classes did not object to their scions entering the service of the new 
Church. Mr James Hamilton of Udston, who died in 1628, left 
" ane hundred pundis to buy ane bell to the kirk of Cambusnethan." 
This was conveyed to the new church at Greenhead, where it sum- 
moned the parishioners to prayer for nearly two hundred years. 
The choir of the old church was the burial-place of the Sommervilles 
of Cam'netban ; and Steuart of Allanton (between whom and the 
Sommerville of that time there was a deep-rooted animosity) strove 
to prevent him burying his dead there, as the General Assembly had 
forbidden the practice — and Sommerville had to content himself 
with a burial-place outside the church at the east gable. Sommer- 
ville looked down with true feudal disdain upon Allanton, whom he 
described " as mere feuar of the Earl of Tweeddale in Auchtermuir, 
whose predecessors never came to sit above the salt-foot at the 
laird of Cam'nethan's table." Then followed a long and acrimonious 
dispute about the erection of a new church in a more central part, 
and a quarrel about precedence in the matter of pews. The great 
question of the hour was, Who was to get the area in front of the 
pulpit ? Coltness, who had given more than anyone else, got the 
place of honour, and Allanton and Sommerville had to content 
themselves with seats in the galleries. Our limited space does not 
permit us to enlarge upon the incumbents. One of them, Mr Vilant, 
became Divinity Professor at St. Andrews in 1691, and another, Mr 
James Hamilton, was made Bishop of Galloway. The late Dr 
Hutton, who died in 1891, after occupying the pulpit for over 
forty years, will long be remembered as a scholarly and much- 
esteemed divine. The charge is now filled by the Rev. John L. 
Rentoul, M.A., late of Sunderland. 

But we cannot pass away from the ecclesiastical history of 
Cam'nethan without a word on the Covenanters, who formed a 



12 

strong party in this district. Darngavel, Darmeid, and the Black 
Loch, were gathering-places for tfjg persecuted remnant. Renwick 
preached at the latter place in 1684, and Steuart of Allanton was 
fined in 3000 inerks because he had seen a large party pass his house 
from the conventicle on their way home, and had not raised the hue- 
and-cry after them. M'Kail was chaplain and tutor in Coltness, 
and was accompanied to the scaffold by his pupils, David and James 
Steuart, in 1666, to whom he gave his Bible. James Gourlay of 
Overtown was at Both well Brig, and escaped by plunging into the 
Clyde up to the neck under the spreading branch of a tree, while 
the. bullets whistled over his head, and at night-fall he took refuge 
in Garion Gill. He died in 1714. Sir Thomas Steuart had to fly 
for his life for furnishing meat and drink to the rebels at Both well. 
One, James Cooper, deponed that he saw Coltness " standing at his 
gate and sending off a sledge with bread, meat, two cold turkeys, 
and drink " — a little photographic touch which brings the whole sad 
scene vividly before us. He was known as "Gospel Coltness." 
Claverhouse and a body of his dragoons once spent a night in Colt- 
ness Mansion. A number of servants and tenantry who were 
Covenanters deemed it prudent to hide in the coal-pits entering 
from the Temple Gill. At supper, Sir James Steuart, the then 
laird, kept urging not to forget to give the nowt their supper — the 
nowt being the fugitive Covenanters. At last Claverhouse com- 
plained that the host seemed more concerned for the comfort of the 
nowt than for that of His Majesty's servants. The morning after 
Both well fight, 23rd June, 1679, Arthur Inglis, tenant of Netherton, 
was herding his covvs at Stockleton Dyke, and had his Bible in his 
hands, when some dragoons happened to be passing. One of them 
fired at him, and missing his aim, galloped up and laid him dead on 
the spot with one stroke of his sword. A tombstone was erected to 
his memory in the old churchyard in 1733. 

Our sketch would not be complete without a few words on the 
old families of the parish. The Steuarts of Allanton and Coltness 
fill a large and honourable space in its history. Old Allanton 
House, which was taken down in 1788, bore the date 1591 on a lintel 
of a door. It was originally a little tower-house of the ordinary 
type. The Steuarts are descended from John, second son of 
Alexander, the sixth Great Steward of Scotland. He married 
Margaret D Bonkyll, and was slain at Falkirk in 1298. His grand- 
son, Allan of Daldowie, married a daughter of the Black Douglas, 
and for his bravery in storming Alnwick Castle was called 
" Alnvvickster. " In 1385, Richard II. invaded Scotland. Allan 
raised a large force, and encountered a party of the English at 
M'.Vlorren's Moor, now called Morningside. His party was victor- 
ious, but he was slain, and buried in the chapel at Beuskaig. This 
battle has given names to many places in the district — Cathburn 
signifies the Battle Burn, and Auchterwater is a corruption of 
Alcath water, the battle of Allan's Water : from which one would 
infer that a Celtic dialect must have been commonly spoken at that 
time. His descendants deserved well of their country, and were 



1-3 

renowned both for their bravery and their learning. The son of the 
heroic Allan got lands on the moor of M'Morren, which he called 
Allanton. His son James was called the "Antiquary,'' and was a 
man of literary tastes. Adam Steuart, another laird, was a friend 
of Wishart, who was martyred at St. Andrews in 1546, and who 
often occupied a hiding-place in the thickest part of the wall of the 
old tower, while a worthy tailor sat with his back to the door and 
excited surprise by the amount of food he seemed to devour, the 
servants not knowing who shared in his enormous meals. Cromwell, 
in 1650, on his way from Glasgow to Edinburgh, visited Allanton. 
Sir Walter kept out of the way, but his lady entertained the great 
general, who offered up a lengthy grace before meat, which seems to 
have edified her greatly ; and her little boy began to handle the hilt 
of his sword, upon which Cromwell clapped him on the head and 
called him " my little captain," and from that day he was called 
"Captain" Steuart — another of those little pictures so much 
despised by historians of the olden school, which light up the dark- 
ness of the past as with an electric light, and put us into living 
contact with the actors and scenes of forgotten days : it is a pity 
there are so few of them on record. Sir Henry Steuart, who 
married in 1787 the daughter of Hugh Seton of Touch, in the County 
of Stirling, united his own ancient line with another of the most 
ancient and honourable families in Scotland, in whom the offices of 
heritable armour-bearer to the King, and the squire of the royal body, 
had been vested for centuries. The Coltness Steuarts were a branch 
of this family. Sir Walter Steuart of Allanton purchased in 1653 the 
estate of Coltness for his younger brother, James. An old spae-wife 
had prophesied when the boys were at school at Lanark that Walter 
■would be Laird of Allanton, and another lad, a cousin, Laird of West- 
shield ; " but as for you," she said to James, " ye're to be the laird 
o' God's blessing, and ye'r ain hand winnin', and ye'll maybe some 
day help to gie the lairds a lift." He married a niece of Sir Thomas 
Hope, the Lord Advocate, of whom the irrepressible Sommerville 
remarked that "her faither keepit a worsted shop in the Lucken- 
booths." By a second marriage he got the property of Goodtrees, 
and was of so much consequence as to be present at a conference in 
1650, on Bruntsfield Links, with Cromwell, Argyle, and the Earl 
of Eglinton, when, no doubt, some of the dark and dangerous designs 
which were afterwards carried into execution were discussed. It 
must have been a bitter pill for Sommerville to have to sell the lands 
of West Carbarns or Kirkfield to his successful rival. 

The reader knows something of "Gospel Coltness." In 1712, 
Coltness passed into the hands of Sir James Steuart of Goodtrees, 
an eminent lawyer. So far, the Steuarts had been W higs and 
Covenanters, but now a strange phenomenon in the family history 
occurred. The third Sir James of the Goodtrees line, who was born 
in 1713, and married a daughter of the Earl of Wemyss, was intro- 
duced by Lord Elcho to the young Pretender in Holyrood, in the 
famous '45 year, and became, doubtless to the consternation of all 
his connections, a Jacobite, and was exiled for twenty years — per- 



14 

haps was one of those exiles whom Peregrine Pickle, in the immortal 
novel of Smollet's, saw walking on the beach at Boulogne "to 
indulge their longing eyes with a'prospect of the white cliffs of 
Albion, which they must never more approach." But he was 
pardoned, and spent the last seventeen years of his life in Coltness, 
where he wrote a work on political economy, which is said to have 
anticipated the discoveries of Adam Smith. There must have been 
a spice of superstition about this Laird, for he went daily to an 
arbour in the grounds to meet the shade of Mr Trotter of Mid- 
lothian, who had promised on his deathbed to return, if possible, 
from the other world, and give him an interview. This incident 
was made into a ballad, called "The Laird of Coul's Ghost," which 
used to be sold by the pedlars. The last of this long and dis- 
tinguished line, Sir James Steuart, died in 1839, and so there was 
" an end of an auld sang." At his death the estates passed into the 
hands of the Houldsworth family. 

Coltness got its name from an old village which once stood near 
Coltness Mill, and was called Col Ness, or the coal point, from the 
seams of coal which protruded from the bank of the river. This was 
burnt in the time of Wallace by English Soldiers, and the charred 
and blackened bank reminds us of the "auld touu of Col Ness." 
Near it is Wincie's or Winifred's Well, where our ancestors used to 
pray, leaving their offerings tied with scarlet thread to the adjacent 
bushes. 

The Cam'nethan estate and Barony, after passing through several 
hands, came into the Sommerville family in 1372. The Sommer- 
villes were a pugnacious and spendthrift race, with a large share of 
aristocratic contempt for the " new men " of their times. One of 
them in 1520, siding with Angus in a dispute about who should be 
Lord Provost of Edinburgh, drove the rival candidate, the Earl of 
Arran, out of the city. The last Baron died in 1659, and was buried 
in Greyfriars. Sommerville of Dram sold the estate to Sir John 
Harper, Sheriff-Depute of the county. He took down Baird's 
Tower and built a stately mansion which lasted for 160 years, and 
then the lands came into the hands of a branch of the Lockharts, 
another of our old and honourable families. It was a Lockhart who 
brought back the heart of Bruce from the Holy Land, and got for 
his armorial bearings a heart within a lock and the motto — corda 
serrata pando. The debt we owe to those brave old chieftains is too 
much forgotten in our time by many who seem to think that our 
history began only yesterday, and with themselves. 

The Belhaven family has been long in our midst. At one time 
there were Hamiltons in Coltness and Wishaw. Sir John Hamilton 
of Biel, connected with the Hamiltons of Barncleuth, relatives of 
the Coltness and Wishaw Hamiltons, was a great supporter of 
Charles I., and when his followers hesitated about entering Berwick 
and occupying it for the King, he cried, " Bide through !" and 
dashed into the town like a bold cavalier. He was created Lord 
Belhaven and Stenton on Dec. 15th, 1647, and " Ride through " 
became his motto. He was supposed to have perished in the Solway 



15 

when flying from his enemies, hut it was a false report. He got to 
London, and worked as a gardener till Charles II. came home again 
in 1660. His successor was the famous Lord Belhaven who opposed 
the Union in a speech worthy of the great classical orators, and 
who, heing arrested as a Jacobite and carried to the Tower, was so 
mortified that he took brain fever, and died in 1708. The fifth Lord 
died without issue in 1777, and there was a litigation about the 
succession between the descendants of John Hamilton of Coltness, 
and those of William Hamilton of Wishaw, which ended in the 
claims of the latter being admitted in 1799. On the death of the 
last Lord Belhaven, who died without issue, there was another 
litigation about the succession to the title and estates, which ended 
in James Hamilton, the present Lord, establishing his claim to 
represent the families of Udston, Wishaw, and Stevenstoun. 

Such is a brief sketch of the civil, religious, ami social history 
of the parish. The " Coltness Papers " and the " Memorie of the 
Sommervilles " contain much interesting matter, which has never 
yet been fully utilised, although the historical sketches of the parish 
by the Rev. Peter Brown, of Wishaw, embody some of the most 
striking events recorded in them. The descriptions in " Old 
Mortality " of Clydesdale scenes and Clydesdale people give us the 
best picture of the condition of the parish in the 17th and 18th 
centuries, before the furnaces began to blaze on the horizon, and the 
locomotive to shriek through the quiet valleys. They apply to the 
whole district, and there must have been many Cuddy Headrigs, 
and Poundtexts, and Henry Mortons, and Edith Bellendens in the 
neighbourhood, not to speak of Trooper Halliday and Jenny 
Dennison — all of them taken from the life — resuscitated by the 
magic of the great wizard from the dusky tomes and dreary tracts 
and worm-eaten manuscripts which he pored over till the whole 
life of those bygone centuries rose before him " like an exhalation," 
and he fixed it in his immortal romances for all time, and showed us 
how young hearts beat with love and ambition in that hard, stern, 
disputatious age, much the same as they are beating now. Even 
the reverend author of the Statistical Account for 1839 warms up 
into something like poetry in describing his parish. He says — 
"From Knownowton you see the Castle of Edinburgh, Tinto, 
Loudon Hill, Dumbarton Castle, and the hills of Argyleshire ; and 
to no evening scene have I ever beeu attracted with greater rapture 
than to observe the summer sun setting behind the serrated cliffs of 
Arran, or throwing a blaze of parting radiance around the lofty Ben 
Lomond. From the church of Cam'nethan you can see fifteen 
country churches besides those of Glasgow." 

THE PROGRESS OK WISHAW. 

If any of the old inhabitants of Cam'nethan could revisit the 
glimpses of the moon, they would be very much astonished at the 
changes that have taken place since Wishawtown was a small 
hamlet, occupied mostly by handloom weavers. With what wonder 
would they gaze upon the streets, shops, churches, iron-works, &c, 



16 

that have sprung up as if at the waving of a magic wand during the 
last forty or fifty years. It is-enough to say that in 1801 the 
population of Wishaw was ahout 400, and that of the parish 1972, 
while in 1891 it had risen to 22,710. Everybody knows about the 
Glasgow Iron & Steel Company, the Excelsior Iron Works, the Father 
Iron & Steel Company, Coltness Iron Works, the Distillery, and the 
collieries, iron-foundries, and engineer establishments of the district, 
which give employment to so many of the toiling multitude. The 
energy of the business men of Wishaw is proverbial, and those who 
have met them round the social board know that the pursuit of gain 
is combined in the case of many of them with a geniality and 
intelligence which shows that they look on money-making as a 
means to an end, and not the " be-all and the end-all " of existence. 
Since 1887 there has been no accession of importance to the number 
of public works in the town or district ; but while this is so, many 
well-known firms, such as the Glasgow Iron & Steel Company, Bel- 
haven Iron & Steel & Patent Nail Company, Coltness Iron Company, 
&c, have made important additions to their Works, thus giving em- 
ployment to a large number of additional hands. Of these extensions, 
perhaps the most important, as it certainly i3 the most costly, is the 
ammonia plant erected by the Coltness Iron Company in connection 
with their furnaces at Newmains. Erected at a cost of between 
£40,000 and £50,000, the ammonia plant deals with the gases emitted 
by the furnaces, extracting the waste prod ucts therefrom, and returning 
the purified gases to the boilers to be utilised in the raising of steam. 
The installation of the ammonia plant, added to the full complement 
of fire-brick stoves recently introduced, places these furnaces in the 
unique position of being the best equipped in the country. 

As an indication of the growing prosperity and importance of 
the town, the erection of a public slaughterhouse, the extension of 
the gasworks, and the erection of a new and commodious post-office 
may be mentioned. A new school is in course of erection at a cost 
of about £10,000. While large firms and public bodies are thus 
spending money in extending their business or developing their 
trusts, the general prosperity of the past few years has encouraged 
capitalists to turn their attention to the value of house property in 
the burgh, with the gratifying result that many fine shops and 
superior dwelling-houses have been recently erected. 

Perhaps the best idea of the progress and prosperity of Wishaw 
can be obtained by a glance at the metamorphosis that the Main 
Street has undergone during the past half dozen years. One by one 
the old thatch houses are disappearing, giving place to modern 
edifices, many of them of considerable architectural beauty. To 
mention only a few — Burns' Tavern, Mr Muir's building, the 
New Post Office buildings, Mr Leggat's Polytechnic, the Tres 
Bonanza warehouse of Mr Milne, and the handsome pile of shops 
and offices erected by Mr Gibson at the corner of Russell 
Street, are worthy of any provincial town. Nor has building ex- 
tension been confined to the Main Street — many fine villas and 
blocks of dwelling-houses having been erected in various parts of 



17 

the town. Mr Reid, whose fame as an animal photographer is 
world-wide, has built a magnificent studio, fitted with every 
accessory that experience, art, or science could devise. Truly, they 
malign us who say that art cannot flourish in the black country of 
Scotland. The schools and churches are healthy and vigorous, and 
fully abreast of the requirements of the time. One gratifying 
feature in the work of the churches is the interest they are showing 
in the welfare of the young, for whose special benefit Christian 
Associations, Guilds, Literary Societies, &c. , have, in recent years, 
been instituted in connection with almost all the churches in the 
district. 

The erection of a goods station in the centre of the town 
has proved a great boon to our merchants and traders. With 
two railway stations, the travelling and trading communities 
are now fairly well served. Those who, in days gone by, had 
to content themselves with " Watt's Noddy," which took three and 
a half hours to cover the distance between Wishaw and Glasgow, 
would be amazed to see the hurry and bustle of a railway platform, 
say, on a Saturday night or a general holiday. A new line from 
Newcastle to Glasgow, by way of Hawick and Biggar, has been 
projected, and if, as expected, it passes through Wishaw, we may 
look for additional railway facilities in the near future. 

Altogether, the industrial history of the past five years has been 
one of almost unbroken prosperity. With our advantages of situa- 
tion, our untouched mineral wealth, and our shrewd and energetic 
men of business, there is no reason to be dissatisfied with the future 
prospects of our good old town. 

II.-SHOTTS. 
Shotts Parish was originally a part of Both well, and was not dis- 
joined till 1457. A flint-flake found in the Lily Loch and some stones 
about whose origin antiquarians and geologists dispute, may be men- 
tioned as the sole relics of the original Celtic population, who, how- 
ever, have given names to the more striking natural features — the hills 
and streams of the district. The Roman Road passedover the hills of 
Braco, and Roman coins have been discovered in its neighbourhood. 
Pope Sixtus IV. confirmed in 1476 the erection " of the Church of 
Bartram Shotts in that desert place called St. Catherine's." 
Bartram is said to have been a robber who was slain by the laird of 
Muirhead, who obtained as a reward the lands of Lauchop, so called 
because the dying bandit gave a spasmodic laugh, and Muirhead 
exclaimed, " will ye laugh up yet." Such is the traditional account, 
which, no doubt, is based on some obscure historical fact. The 
Muirheads were in this part of the country as far back as 1165. 
Shotts signifies a plot of ground — a rig-length. Salsburgh is said to 
be named from Sally, wife of Mr Young, of Craighead. Traces of 
old habitations — how old none can say — are to be found on the 
Papperthill Craigs and the Caut hills. The eastern half of the 
parish was called the Barony of Bothwell Moor. Most of the local 
names are Celtic. Blairmuck is the field of the Boar ; Moffat, the 



18 

foot of the moss ; Duntealing, prospect hills ; Calder, the wooded 
stream. Whitecross, near Craigend, was the site of a cross, which 
in Catholic times marked the boundary of the sanctuary. In 1744, 
when Dr. Carlyle — "Jupiter" Carlyle as he was called — travelled 
through it, Whitburn consisted of a single house, and there was 
scarcely a cottage east of the Kirk. The historical events con- 
nected with Shotts are few. In 1570, two captains, Andrew 
Cunninghame and Thomas Crawford, harried Bothwell Moor, and 
carried off a great quantity of horses and cattle to Edinburgh. In 
1650, Cromwell marched with horse and foot by the Kirk of Shotts 
on his way to Edinburgh, and had much difficulty in transporting 
his cannon. In 1651, he encamped for a night at Shotts. In 1678, 
Monmouth's army encamped at Muirhead Farm on their way to 
Bothwell, and remains of the earth-works they threw up were seen 
till recently. And in 1745, the Highlanders committed various 
depredations on their way homewards, and left traces of their 
passage in a claymore, which is still preserved, and some other 
relics. Before the separation, Shotts was served by a vicar from 
Bothwell, which was then a collegiate church with a provost and 
eight prebendaries. Shotts Kirk was dedicated to the Virgin and 
St. Catherine of Sienna, who has left indications of her position as 
patron saint in Kate's Well, Kate's Park, and Kate's Brae. There 
was an establishment of the same kind at Chapelhall, where the 
Lauchop family were buried up to the beginning of the last century. 
The present church was opened in 1821. The first minister after 
the Reformation was John Hamilton, who had charge of Bothwell, 
Shotts, and Monkland. He employed a reader to do duty at Shotts 
at a salary of " 20 pundis " yearly. Among the ministers we find 
two Muirheads of Lauchop, and Dr. Baillie (father of the celebrated 
poetess, Joanna Baillie), who became minister of Bothwell and 
Professor of Divinity in Glasgow. The Rev. William Martin Watt, 
during whose long and successful ministry three quoad sacra 
parishes have been erected, viz. : — Cleland, Calderhead, and Hart- 
hill — vvas ordained in 1844. The Session records contain a number 
of interesting facts which illustrate the past history of the parish. 
The jougs or iron collar by which offenders against ecclesiastical 
discipline were fastened to the kirk door; the "stool of repentance," 
and the sackcloth gown, were all in use in the seventeenth century. 
We find men and women accused of bewitching hens and cattle, of 
"charming" for sickness both in man and beast, of raising fearful 
storms, and even of causing the death of their neighbours. Others 
are summoned for using the terms "limmer" and " loune," and 
"ane auld moulie-toothed runt," in their anger. John Scott com- 
pears in 1643, and acknowledges that in a drunken quarrel he drew 
his whinger, and there were " some bled fingers among them." The 
Covenanters had a strong party in the parish, and Cargill preached 
a funeral sermon for Cameron in 1681, at Deer Slunk, a moss near 
Benhar. Peden's Stone, from which he held forth, is shown near 
Benhar farmhouse ; and men from Shotts were at Bothwell Brig, 
the Battle of the Pentlands, and other risings of the persecuted 



19 

remnant. There was a great revival in 1630, when Messrs John 
Livingstone, Robert Bruce, and David Dickson preached at a 
communion, which does not seem to have been marked by the 
extravagancies that have attended recent phenomena of the kind, 
but was productive of lasting good. The parishioners were tenacious 
of their rights, and the settlement of an unpopular minister in 1738 
led to a secession. In 1739, Ralph Erskine preached in the parish, 
and the Church was formed in Shottsburn, to which the Rev. John 
Ritchie ministered from February, 1855, to May, 1891, when he 
resigned, and died at Bellside Cottage, Cleland, on 27th January, 
1892. The Original Seceders, as they are called, claim to be the 
true representatives of the Erskines. 

Murdostoun was originally occupied by a family of the name of 
Murdoch, or Murthock, and it came into the Buccleugh family, in 
the thirteenth century, by the marriage of Sir Richard Scott to the 
heiress of Murdostoun. The Duke of Buccleugh still bears the arms 
of the original family. Nesbit says Walter Scott of Balwearie, in 
Fife, was the fortunate man; but Sir Richard le Scott de Murthock- 
ston appears in the Ragman's Roll, and Michael, his brother, was 
progenitor of the Balwearie family. Michael Scott, the Wizard, 
was a relation of the Murdostoun family. There is a mass of whin- 
stone, called the Packstane, at the east end of the parish, which he 
ordered his " familiar" to carry to Queensferry, where he was about 
to build a bridge over the Forth ; but the two quarrelled near 
Muirhead, and the fiend threw down his pack, or load, where it 
remains to this day. In 1446, Scott of Murdostoun exchanged lands 
with Thomas Inglis of Manir ; and from the Scotts of Branksholm 
comes the powerful family of Buccleugh. Murdostoun passed from 
the family of Inglis in 1719, when Alexander Inglis died without 
heirs, and left the estate to Alexander Hamilton, a relative, who 
also possessed the Cleland Estate at that time. His son, General 
Hamilton, who died in 1803, left the estates to an adopted son — 
James Anderson, who, under his patronage, rose from being a 
common soldier to be an officer in the army. He died fighting 
bravely at Waterloo, in 1815. When his left arm was cut off, he 
snatched the reins of his grey charger in his mouth and cheered on 
his regiment, but soon fell mortally wounded. The estate then 
passed into the hands of the Cochranes, and was sold eventually to 
the late Robert Stewart, Esq., ex-Lord Provost of Glasgow (who was 
chiefly instrumental in introducing the water supply into the city 
from Loch Katrine), and it is now owned by his son, Robert King 
Stewart, Esq. 

The Clelands of that ilk were an old and distinguished family. 
The first known to history was married to a daughter of Wallace of 
Riccarton, uncle of the patriot Wallace. The Clelands figure in the 
poems of " Blind Harry." They had their full share in all the 
battles, murders, and conspiracies of the old troublous times. They 
fought at Bannockburn and Flodden, and were art and part in the 
murders of Darnley and of the two Regents. They intermarried 
with the Sommervilles, the Stuarts of Blantyre, and other noble 



20 

families, and sent out off-shoots to Faskin, Monkland, Gartness, not 
to speak of Knownoblehill, Haresh>w, and Auchinlea. Alexander, 
the last owner, sold the estate, and it was purchased from his 
creditors, in 1711, by Gavin Hamilton of Inverdovat, for £2432. 
His son, Hamilton of Murdostoun, sold it in 1766 to Captain 
Hew Dalrymple of Fordal for the sum of £6310. The Cleland 
family is still represented, we believe, in the direct line, in Ireland. 
They were originally foresters to the old Earls of Douglas, and 
bore on their shield a hare with a hunting-horn round its neck, and 
their crest was a falcon on a gauntlet. In heraldic terms, Azure, a 
hare saliant, Argent ; with a hunting-horn, Vert, hanging about its 
neck, garnished Gules ; motto, non sibi, and at other times, " for 
sport." Nesbit makes much of them as an old and distinguished 
race. They also made some figure in literature. William Cleland, 
a descendant of the last Cleland of that ilk, was a friend of Pope's, 
and is said to have been the original of Will Honeycomb in the 
(Spectator. He died in 1741, and his son, John Cleland, wrote an 
immoral tale, entitled " Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure," 
published in 1750, for which he got £20, and it yielded profits to the 
amount of £10,000. Afterwards, he had a pension from Earl 
Granville, and wrote some more tales and works on philology, 
which are said to be not without merit. He died in 1789. 

The Omoa Ironworks, which give a name to the railway station 
at Bellside that excites the curiosity of most travellers from its 
uncouth sound, were erected in 1787 by Colonel William Dalrymple, 
who distinguished himself at the capture of Omoa, on the Spanish 
Main, in the West Indies ; and were kept going till 1866. Up to 
1775, miners were in a state of slavery, and bound to remain on the 
estate ; and when a colliery was sold, they were sold along with it. 
About 1761, the average wage of a collier was from twelve to 
thirteen shillings a week. Most of these details are taken from the 
admirable history of the parish by the late Dr Grossart of Salsburgh. 

Shotts, like Cambusnethan, has risen from being a sleepy 
pastoral parish to be a busy centre of iudustry. There was a 
colliery in operation at Swinstie in 1763, and Benhar has long been 
celebrated for the quality of its coal. But these were wrought in a 
very primitive fashion. There are now collieries scattered over the 
whole of the parish, and the population has risen from 2322 in 1755, 
to 8015 in 1871, and 11930 in 1891. 

The Omoa Iron Works have been noticed already. The Shotts 
Iron Works, erected in 1802, still maintain their reputation; and tile 
works, brick works, quarries, iron-foundries, and chemical manure 
works, give employment to a large number of workmen. Our limited 
space does not permit us to enter into details : suffice it to say that the 
parish of Shotts has no reason to be ashamed of its position in the 
industrial and mercantile world. We have been more taken up 
with the ancient than the modern history of the district, and have 
no time to notice the schools and schoolmasters, the churches and 
clergymen. We can only say that these institutions are doing good 
work, and those who preside over them seem to have the confidence 



21 

of the community. There are indications that the district is not likely 
to fall into a decline, commercially speaking. New pits have been 
sunk near the Cleland Station by the Monkland Co., and by Messrs 
Barrie & Ferguson, and a wide coalfield in the centre of the parish 
is being opened up by Coltness Iron Co., and there is prospect of a 
considerable increase of trade and population. We have seen how the 
old order changes, and the old families pass away. It is well that these 
should be changed, and our active men of business, and the 
industrial armies which they direct, are doing a work not less 
glorious than that of the belted knights and their vassals who 
fought the battles of our country in the olden time. But it is to be 
hoped that these brief sketches of bygone times and manners will 
impress upon the minds of those who may read them the fact that 
the roots of our national greatness are fixed in the soil of the past ; 
and it is well for those who are founding new families, winning new 
reputations, and labouring in more peaceful occupations than those 
of our sires, to look back with a kindly and a grateful glance upon 
the past, and realise that feudal baron and prelate, that Covenanter 
and Presbyterian divine, that e^en those who fought forlorn hopes, 
and championed lost causes — Cavaliers and Jacobites — those who 
stood up for Mary, and those who died for Bonnie Prince Charlie- 
had all a share in building up the complex social order under which 
we now live. Or to quote the words of the inspired old woman 
(Janet Hamilton), who first drew breath in Scarehill, now taken 
up by Omoa Railway Station, past which the locomotive thunders 
every day — typifying the immense change that has taken place 
since she wandered, a " wee Scotch lassie," over the moors and by 
the streams of Shotts parish — 

" I heard her sing ' Auld Robin Gray,' 

An' ' Yarrow's Dowie Den ' — 
0' Flodden, and oor forest flouris 

Cut down by Englishmen. 
My saul was fir'd, my heart was fu', 

The tear was in my e'e ; 
Let ither lan's hae ither sangs— 

Auld Scotland's sangs for me." 



Belbaven ant) Stenton peeraoe. 



HN event of more than usual local interest was the home-coming 
of Lord Belhaven, who entered into possession of the Wishaw 
Estate on the 2nd of August, 1892. It has always been a subject of 
regret that the fine old mansion of the Belhavens should have been 
so long untenanted, and now that the house is once more occupied 
by a representative of this ancient family, it is hoped that his lord- 
ship will continue that kindly interest in the welfare of the burgh, 
which was always so distinguishing a characteristic of the late Lord 
Belhaven. 

A well-known local antiquary (Mr Andrew Hamilton, Quarter, 
by Hamilton) supplies the following interesting particulars of the 
Belhaven and Stenton peerage :— 

The first Lord Belhaven was Sir John Hamilton of Beil, eldest 
son of Sir James Hamilton of Broomhill. The estate of Beil is in 
the parish of Stenton, county of Haddington, and Belhaven or 
Beilhaven, in the parish of Dunbar, appears to have been included in 
the Beil estate. Sir John appears to have given the Broomhill 
property to his brother James, who was minister of Cambusnethan 
for some time before 1663, when he conformed to prelacy, and was 
made Bishop of Galloway. His descendants inherited Broomhill. 
The first Lord Belhaven married Margaret, daughter of James, 
second Marquis of Hamilton, by whom he had three daughters. 
Anne, his second daughter, married Sir Robert Hamilton of 
Silvertonhill. Their eldest daughter, Margaret, married John, 
eldest son of Robert Hamilton of Barncluith and Presmannan. 
Her grandfather, the first Lord Belhaven, settled on 
them the estate of Beil, and resigned his title in favour of her 
husband, who, of course, became second Lord Belhaven, distin- 
guishing himself for the active part he took in public affairs, and for 
his patriotism. The third, fourth, and fifth Lords Belhaven, are 
correctly stated by Brown and Anderson. The Barncluith branch 
having failed on the decease of the fifth Lord Belhaven, as narrated 



23 

by the authors above, the title devolved on the Wishaw family, whose 
pedigree may be noted : — The first was William, third son of John 
Hamilton of Udston and his wife, Margaret Muirhead. His elder 
brother was John of Coltness, and his second brother, James, who 
married the heiress of Barncluith, and was grandfather of the second 
Lord Belhaven. William Hamilton, first of Wishaw, was succeeded 
by his eldest son, James, who died about the year 1654 without 
issue, when he was succeeded by his brother, William. He was a 
distinguished antiquary in his day, and wrote the first topographical 
account of the counties of Lanark and Renfrew, entitled " Descrip- 
tion of the Sheriffdoms of Lanark and Renfrew." It was written 
about 1700 or 1710, and is often quoted by antiquarian and 
topographical writers. The work was printed some years ago by 
the Maitland Club, with valuable notes and appendices by the 
editor. In the preface, the following notice is given of Mr 
Hamilton : — " The author of these descriptions derived his descent 
from the ducal house of Hamilton, his father, William Hamilton of 
Wishaw, being the younger son of John Hamilton of Udston, an 
early branch of that noble family. He had probably the advantage 
of a juridical education, and appears to have been an accurate, 
industrious, and, considering the difficulties then attending the 
subject, a most successful enquirer into Scottish history and 
antiquities, particularly as regards his own neighbourhood. . . . 
That he was highly esteemed among his contemporaries, we have 
the authority of Crawford, the most eminent genealogist of his time, 
who characterises Mr Hamilton of Wishaw, as an ' antiquary of no 
little fame,' and particularly acknowledges his obligations to him. 
It would certainly have been very gratifying to those now entrusted 
with the printing of this volume to have been able to have added 
something like a connected account of Mr Hamilton's literary and 
antiquarian pursuits, could the requisite materials have been ob- 
tained for that purpose. These, there is reason to suppose, may 
still exist, and it is to be hoped, may yet be made available to the 
public." This hope, I believe, has not yet been realised. William 
Hamilton of Wishaw married first, in 1660, his cousin Anne, 
daughter of John Hamilton of Udston, by whom he had six sons 
and a daughter ; secondly, in 1676, Mary, eldest daughter of Sir 
Charles Erskine of Alva, fifth son of the Earl of Mar — by her he had 
also a large family of five sons and six daughters. He lived to a 
very advanced age and died about 1724 or 1726. His eldest son 
William died unmarried before his father. His second son, Robert 
Hamilton, younger of Wishaw, married, in 1686, Jean, only 
daughter and heiress of William Hamilton of Browmuir, in Ayr- 
shire, by whom he had four sons — William, Robert, John, and 
James of Stevenston. Robert having predeceased his father, he was 
succeeded by his grandson, William, who in 1756 was killed by a 
fall from his horse, a3 stated by Mr Brown. His son, Robert 
Hamilton of Wishaw, as explained by Mr Anderson in " Scottish 
Nation," on the death of James, fifth Lord Belhaven, in 1777, be- 
came in the legal course of succession entitled to the honours, and 



24 

was of right the sixth Lord Belhaven, but he did not assume the 
title. His eldest son, William, vgas seventh Lord Belhaven, and 
his grandson, the late Robert Montgomery Hamilton, was the 
eighth Lord. The late Lord Belhaven died in 1868, when the title 
became dormant for some time. In 1874, Mr James Hamilton, of 
Albany Street, North Leith, laid claim to the title, and his petition 
was referred to the Committee of Privileges of the House of Lords. 
By parole and documentary evidence he made good his claim to the 
title as nearest male heir, proving that he was lineally desceaded 
from James Hamilton of Stevenston, parish of Bothwell, who was 
the fourth son of Robert Hamilton of Wishaw, and grandson of 
William Hamilton, the antiquary. James Hamilton of Stevenston, 
fourth and youngest son of Robert Hamilton, younger of Wishaw, 
was born in 1700, and died in 1769, married Helen, daughter of 
Andrew Baillie of Parbroath, who died in 1758 — had four sons : 
John, Robert, Andrew, who all died without issue, and James, 
second of Stevenston, who was born in 1745. He died before hi3 
wife, Mary, daughter of Archibald Nisbet of Carphin, who died in 
1812. They had three sons — James, captain in the army, who pre- 
deceased his brother without issue ; Archibald, born in 1777, 
surgeon in 92nd Regiment, died at Edinburgh in 1823, married 
Mary Clark, who died in Edinburgh in 1856 — had two sons ; James, 
born at Edinburgh in 1822, the claimant, and now ninth Lord 
Belhaven and Stenton. His brother Archibald died at sea in 1839, 
unmarried. Another claimant for the title was Colonel Robert 
William Hamilton, who was lineally descended from Alexander, 
fifth son of William Hamilton of Wishaw, the antiquary, by his 
second wife, Mary, eldest daughter of Sir Charles Erskine, but as 
James Hamilton was lineally descended from the antiquary by his 
first wife, Anne, daughter of John Hamilton of Udston, his claim 
was preferable. 



Summer Drives. 




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SUMMER DRIVES. 



— ' v -»-^af#'-r v <--c- — 




Mortality. 



I.-TILLIETUDLEM. 

HE drive which may be first described is to one 
of the numerous places around which the genius of 
Sir Walter Scott has thrown the halo of romance 
— Craignethan Castle, the " Tillietudlem " of "Old 
Starting from the Cross, and entering Stewarton 
Street, the first point the visitor touches is the village of Waterloo 
— so named in consequence of the offer of feus which General Sir 
James Stewart — the last of the old lairds of Coltness — made to the 
men of his regiment after the famous battle. Driving next through 
Overtown, a steep descent is made by the " horseley-brae " into 
the valley of the Clyde. On the left is passed Garriongill — a fav- 
ourite retreat for the Covenanters in the clays of the persecution — 
and Garrion Tower, the residence of James Scott, Esq. — specially 
referred to in the " Historical Sketches." To the right, embosomed 
in the woods, is Cam'nethan House, the seat of the Lockharts. 
Crossing Garrion Bridge, built in 1817, the road runs along a tract 
of country which has practically undergone no change since Dorothy 
Wordsworth, travelling along with her brother and the poet Cole- 
ridge over eighty years ago, remarked " its bunches of gorse or 
broom, and small patches of uncultivated ground left high and low, 
among the potatoes, corn, and cabbages, which grow intermingled, 
now among trees, now bare." Mauldslie Castle, once the seat of the 
Carmichaels, Earls of Hyndford, and Milton Lockhart, which Sir 
Walter Scott was wont to visit, are among the more imposing 
edifices which adorn the fair and smiling meadows on the opposite 
bank of the river. Rosebank, which sprang into existence in 1810 
on the decay of Dalserf, is the only village passed ere arriving at 
Tillietudlem. At the hostelry established for the convenience of 
the increasing number of summer tourists, a halt is made, and the 
rest of the journey continued on foot. The Castle is reached by "a 
narrow footpath that winds up a singularly romantic glen, rich, in 



28 

varied forest trees, and full of picturesque beauty. " It was built 
by Sir James Hamilton, son of ohe Earl of Arran, about 1529, but 
in the latter part of the seventeenth century, the castle that stood 
within the fortified wall was pulled down, and a more modern one 
built of the material, which still remains there, and is occupied by 
the keeper. " This house, Lord Douglas, to whom it belonged, at 
one time offered to Sir Walter Scott for his residence ; and it was 
on the cards, Lockhart tells us, that the great novelist's latter days 
might have been passed in his own Tillietudlem, with the shadows 
of Jenny Dennison, and Mause, and Cuddy Headrigg, and the Major, 
and Burleigh, and the rest of them, around him." The site is 
naturally very strong, and before the invention of artillery, the 
bulwarks must have been almost impregnable. " A high and solid 
wall of hewn stone, a great part of which is still standing, flanked 
with massive towers, and perforated with loop-holes pointing in all 
directions, surrounded the principal building, enclosing within its 
ample compass a courtyard, intersected with a deep moat faced on 
each side with hewn stone, over which was thrown a drawbridge, 
defended by two parallel vaults, which are still accessible, though 
deeply buried in the rubbish wherewith the moat is filled. The 
buildings are much dilapidated, a great part of the wall being en- 
tirely swept away, having been used as a quarry for the neighbouring 
farm houses. The two towers which remain are crowned with a 
thick coppice of rowan-tree, bourtree, hazel, ash, briar, and haw- 
thorn ; and — what will tend to convey some idea of the extraordinary 
massiveness of the structure — several bushes of saugh flourish in 
great luxuriance on the top of the walls. A large vaulted hall is 
still shown, called the Queen's Room, wherein it is said the ill- 
fated Mary lodged one night in her flight from the disastrous battle 
of Langside ; and in a subterranean vault, there is a circular well, 
which one tradition reports to have descended to a level with the 
bed of the Nethan, and communicating with that rivulet, to have 
supplied the garrison with water during a siege ; while, according 
to another, it formed the entrance of a tier of lower vaults, in which 
those wretches who incurred the displeasure of their feudal tyrant 
were hopelessly confined. Be these accounts as they may, the well 
is now nearly choked up, several of the large stones of its mouth 
having been thrown in, and every visitor to the castle takes the 
liberty of throwing down the well a blazing bunch of broom, or 
some other combustible substance, that he may see the depth and 
construction of this curious remnant of antiquity. Over the 
entrance to the principal building is seen a much-effaced escutcheon, 
in which it is still possible to trace the armorial supporters of 
Hamilton ; and the arms of the Hays, and of some other families 
which formerly had possession of the castle, are yet to be seen on 
various places of the walls." Among the objects of interest at the 
Castle may be seen a set of querns or handmills, of great antiquity, 
and one of the original iron gratings which protected the windows 
of the old building. Three venerable yew-trees also attract the 
attention of the tourist. 



29 

II. -LANARK AND THE FALLS OF CLYDE. 

Visitors to Tillietudlem sometimes find it convenient to make 
the run to Lanark and the Falls of Clyde on the same day, and the 
Caledonian Railway Company arrange a pleasant circular tour 
during the summer embracing the whole journey, but it is much 
more enjoyable for picnic parties to devote a day to each of the drives, 
which have charms peculiarly their own. Accordingly, resuming 
the description of the route mentioned in last chapter, after driving 
past Tillietudlem Inn, the first village touched is Crossford or 
Nethanfoot. Here the smoke from a neighbouring coal-pit and 
other prosaic surroundings, detract somewhat from the beauty of the 
landscape, but soon there open before the eye of the beholder 
delightful vistas of one of the prettiest fruit regions in the whole of 
Scotland. As a local poet puts it, it is a — 

" Land of broad orchards, rich beyond all price, 

That bathe their boughs all day in warm sunlight — 
Whose beauty stirs up dreams of Paradise, 

When life ran pure with innocent delight ! 
When spring-time comes, and fostering breezes blow, 

Moist dews descend, and sun-smit raindrops fall, 
And all the trees their outspread blossoms show — 

Oh ! then it is a joy to come and look on all." 

Clydesdale is still celebrated for its apples, pears, and plums ; but 
it is yearly becoming even more famous a centre for the cultivation 
of the strawberry. This is a digression ; and while musing on the 
changes which the " whirligig of time " has brought, Hazelbank and 
Linnvale villages are passed, and it is time to draw up and inspect 
the Fall of Stonebyres. A narrow pathway, which branches off 
from the public road, leading through a small wood, brings the 
spectator to a part of the precipitous banks, where the Fall is 
observed to great advantage. In front, the river is seen pouring 
over a height of eighty feet, a sheet of white and billowy foam. 
" Just at the edge of the precipice," writes Dr. VV. C. Smith, " the 
water is divided by a rock in mid-channel, and makes a double fall, 
the one almost at right angles to the other, and again, uniting in the 
pool below, plunges in full volume over the next two stages, after 
which it foams and swirls away over the rocky channel, under the 
dipping trees that clothe the steep banks of the river on both sides. 
The Rhine throws a mightier volume of water over its falls, and 
that counts for something in the impression which is produced. But 
the deep, wooded gorge at Stonebyres, the red sandstone rocks 
tinted with grey and orange lichen, and the diverse form of the 
three foaming cataracts, combine to form a scene of grand and 
solemn beauty which is more satisfying, at least to my eye, than the 
mighty rush and swirl of the great German river." Resuming the 
journey, a hamlet known as Dublin is passed. Then Kirkfieldbank ; 
and at the extremity of this once busy weaving village it is 
necessary to turn to the right and drive up the hill if it is intended 
to " do " Cora Linn from the left side of the Clyde. It is only on 
certain specified days, however, that this privilege is obtained ; 



30 

and a pass should be secured beforehand from the factor on the 
Corehouse Estate. Entering by, the keeper's lodge, the road leads 
by a magnificent avenue — a mile in length — to Cora Castle and Cora 
Falls, which are in the immediate vicinity of Corehouse, the seat of 
C. E. H. E. Cranston, Esq. The Castle is in ruins, and nothing is 
known of when or by whom it was built. The Linn or Fall of 
Cora and the estate of Corehouse are supposed to have taken their 
name from Cora, an ancient Caledonian Princess, who was dashed 
to destruction by the leap of her palfrey over the cliff into the 
cataract. The Fall makes a total descent of 84 feet, but is twice 
caught by ledges of rocks, so that it makes three bounds. 

" Down all the rocks the torrent roars, 
Away its hurrying- waters break, 
Faster and whiter dash and curl, 
Till down the dark abyss they hurl. 
Rises the fog -smoke white as snow, 
Thunders the raging stream below." 

" The awe, the terror, the astonishment which this scene produces 
on an unaccustomed observer, may be somewhat partially conceived, 
but can hardly be described. The white foaming torrent in front, 
the yawning chasm from which a smoke-like mist continually 
ascends, the black and frowning rocks covered with overhanging 
trees, crowned with the ancient castle, the whole bounded by the 
distant hills, form altogether a coup d'ceil of the most sublime 
description, infinitely heightened by the thunder of the falling 
water, and the depth of the tremendous precipice, on the verge of 
which the spectator stands." 

Bonnington Fall, half-a-mile distant, is by no means so striking 
or so impressive, but it is none the less interesting, chiefly, perhaps, 
as it is "the first step of the great stair down which the Clyde 
throws and writhes itself into the newer world." On the somewhat 
narrow expanse above the fall, the eye rests upon the still, silent 
rush of the waters, and then follows the current until it plunges in 
full volume into one unbroken leap of thirty feet. On the opposite 
side of the river, a small island overlooks the chasm, and, passing 
along a bridge, from this "coign of vantage " by far the best idea 
may be realised of 

"The torrent's smoothness ere it dash below." 

If the Lanark route to the Falls is preferred, the drive leads 
past Kirkfieldbank, over the bridge which spans the Mouse Water, 
and winds up a steep ascent into the ancient and historic county 
town. That Lanark is a place of great antiquity is universally 
admitted, the first Parliament mentioned in history being that con- 
vened here by Kenneth II. in 978. As the visitor turns into the 
broad thoroughfare of the royal burgh, the parish church is passed. 
In a niche over the eastern door of the building stands a colossal 
statue of Sir William Wallace by Robert Forrest, a self-taught 
genius belonging to Crossford. The ruins of the old kirk, half-a- 
mile distant, erected in the 12th century ; the cemetery, with its 
quaint tombstones ; the Smyllum Orphanage, erected at a cost of 



31 

£15,000, and containing some rich sculptural decorations ; the fancy 
wood works of Messrs Archibald Brown & Co. , and other places of 
interest, are all worth visiting ; but in prospect of the journey to 
the Falls, there is not much time for sight-seeing in Lanark. At 
any of the principal hotels tickets of admission to the grounds are 
obtained. Leaving the Cross by the Wellgate, the way leads past 
several neat villas until the first gate is reached. At the second, 
the passes are delivered up, carriages are left, and the remainder 
of the journey is performed on foot. Soon Cora is beheld in all its 
grandeur — the effect being heightened when the visitor descends the 
steps a little to the right, and obtains a full view of the thundering 
rapids from the romantic natural amphitheatre below, where — 
" Down through the glen — 
Like loons on a border foray, 
Clyde comes rushing, 
And foaming, and gushing, 
And the woodlands wide, 
And the broad hillside 
Feathered wi' broom ; 
And rocks grown hoary 

Wi' lichens and age, 
And caverns ben 

Frae their inmost gloom, 
Echo the mighty rage 
O' the angry Clyde." 

A beautiful though more distant prospect of the scene may be had 
from the window of a pavilion erected by Sir James Carmichael of 
Bonnington in 1708 — erected on the crown of a bank overlooking 
the cliff. It is furnished with mirrors which reflect the scenery, 
and so placed that the visitor, by sitting in certain positions, can 
see as it were the waters bursting over him. Returning to the 
main walk, a journey of half-a-mile — winding along the bank of the 
river through a grove of trees — leads to Bonnington Fall, already 
described. The day is now far spent, and returning to the town, 
the drive homewards is resumed. 

The route may be reversed by taking the high road, leading by 
way of Carluke, to Wishaw. 

III.— DOUGLAS KIRK AND CASTLE. 
On account of the length of the journey, the drive to Douglas 
is not so frequently taken as that to the places already described 
along the valley of the Clyde ; but as it is each year becoming 
better known, it is fast gaining in popularity and in interest. Pic- 
nic parties from Wishaw usually take the old Carlisle road route 
direct to Lesmahagow, which possesses some well - appointed 
hostelries, and affords a convenient halting-place. Passing through 
Lesmahagow, the sweet and shady valley of the Nethan, lying at 
some distance to the left, is entered, and in about an hour Douglas 
is reached. Visitors, on arriving, usually take a leisurely saunter 
through its quiet streets, and turn aside to inspect the kirk of the 
patron saint, St. Bride. The ancient edifice was founded in the 
twelfth century, but a portion of the south aisle (reserved by an old 
charter of the Douglases as a burying-place for persons of the 



32 

honoured name of Inglis) and the chancel, are all that now remain of 
what must at one time have been a splendid Gothic structure. This 
latter portion of the building was restored at considerable expense 
by LordDunglass in 1880. The work occupied three years in com- 
pletion, and was superintended by Mr Anderson, architect, 
Edinburgh, who saw that the gorgeous carvings and other fine 
architectural features of the early Gothic were preserved as near as 
possible as they were chiselled out by the saintly monks of Kelso 
many centuries ago. The most striking feature of the interior of 
the chancel is the monument erected to the memory of the late 
Countess of Home — Lucy Elizabeth, the last of the princely race of 
Douglases— who died on 15th May, 1877. It is a noble work of art 
from the stduio of Mr J. E. Boehm, the famous sculptor — the 
delicate tracery and rich folds of the dress, the lineaments of the 
face, and the pose of the figure, being remarkably striking and 
beautiful. At the foot of this monument is a casket which holds 
the dust of the heart of "the Good Sir James" — that Douglas 
(enshrined in the poetry and romance of Scotland) who had the 
honour of being entrusted by Bruce to bear his heart to Palestine, 
and who fell on his way thither in battle with the Saracens. The 
old poet Barbour quaintly narrates how the ships came back to 
Scotland bringing home Sir James dead, and how 

" His bones full honourably 
Into the Kirk of Douglas were 
Buried with dule and meikle care." 

Barbour also recites how Sir Archibald, the brother of the dead 
knight, got " albastor baith fair and fine," to make a tomb 

" Sa richly 
As it behoved ane sae worthy." 

Sir Walter Scott, whose last journey to Scotland was to the Kirk of 
St. Bride, considered this tomb of the good Sir James to be "not 
inferior to the best of the same period in Westminster Abbey ;" 
but in presence of the fact that Cromwell's soldiers turned the old 
chancel where it was erected into a stable for their horses, and that 
the place stood open to the mischief-loving Douglasdale youths of a 
later day, it is not surprising to find the " albastor fair and fine " 
shorn of its original magnificence. Other tombs and effigies of the 
Douglases, which fill niches in the wall, also betray signs of 
vandalism which characterised a less enlightened and ruder age. A 
richly-stained glass window (erected to the memory of the late Earl 
of Home) now fills the northern portion of the chancel, and the floor 
is laid with encaustic tiles. Underneath is the burial vault, where 
one above another are piled the stone or lead coffins of the dead 
Douglases of many generations. An ivy-mantled spire surmounts 
the edifice, and the bell still summons the village parishioners to 
worship — as in those old days when the Lanark Presbytery used to 
come down on their periodical visitations, to entreat the then 
Marchioness of Douglas and her children to abjure Popery, in order 
that " the little brands, if not the old wood itself, might be plucked 
from the everlasting bnrning." Connected with Douglas and its 



33 

surroundings are associated many traditional stories of James V., 
and many stirring episodes of the great ecclesiastical struggle of the 
17th century. The Castle — the Castle "Dangerous" of Sir Walter 
Scott — is also rich in historic memories, and ought to be visited. 
Only one ruined tower now remains of the once famous stronghold. 
The present owner of the Castle is the Earl of Home, from whose 
factor (Mr John Pringle, Castlemains,) the privilege of admission 
requires previously to be obtained. His Lordship's residence is a 
stately mansion built near the old Castle by the late Duke of 
Douglas in 1760. 

The route is reversed on the return journey. At the crossing 
of the Carlisle road (a direct route to Lanark), two miles from 
Douglas, once stood an old wayside inn, where the mail coaches were 
wont to change their horses, but not a vestige of it now remains. 
A short distance beyond this point the outside stretch of the great 
Lanarkshire coal-field is passed — the Ponfeigh division owned by 
Sir Wyndham C. Anstruther, and the Rigside division by the Earl 
of Home. Ironstone is so abundant that it is to be seen cropping 
out some of the Douglas glens, and there are many hundreds of 
acres of the most valuable seams of coal still unwrought in the lands 
of the lord of Douglasdale, but he will not allow it to be leased nearer 
his policies than Rigside. Here, however, the Swanns of Collierhall, 
father and son, have worked the mineral to a profit for the last half- 
century. Rigside is a curious, old-fashioned village, many of 
whose inhabitants were the sturdiest of Cameronians, and thought 
nothing of travelling on alternate Sundays from their own church 
in Rigside to that at Penpont — a distance altogether of forty miles. 
A narrow stream which separates the two estates is now crossed, 
and the fringe of Carmichael parish is touched. In the distance is 
pointed out a handsome railway bridge, thrown across the Clyde a 
little below Howford road — one of the oldest drove roads in Scot- 
land. The bridge has six arches or spans, each sixty feet, and was 
built by Messrs Freeman & Co. about sixteen years ago. It is thus 
a comparatively modern structure. Not so, however, is Hyndford 
Bridge, which has stood the blasts of a century, and its stone 
buttresses look as substantial as ever. This is the last point of 
interest which the visitor sees ere he enters the county town. The 
drive homeward from Lanark is continued along the valley of the 
Clyde. 

IV— LOUDON HILL AND DRUMCLOG. 
As mentioned in the " Historical Sketches," the parish of Cam- 
busnethan played an important part in the Covenanting struggles, 
and several families are still alive whose forefathers were martyrs 
and heroes in the strife. Apart from the local interest which thus 
attaches to a pilgrimage to the scene of the Battle of Drumclog, the 
route by which it is reached from Wishaw is not unattractive. 
Starting from the Cross, the driver takes his party by way of 
Garrion Bridge, and, entering the old Edinburgh and Ayr ,road, 
passes through the village of Stonehouse to Strathaven. Here a 



34 

halt is made to allow the horses a brief breathing-space. The 
interval is short ; but is sufficient to enable the tourist to inspect 
the ruins of the Castle of Avondale, situated on a rocky eminence 
near the very heart of the town. There is not much now to see in the 
shattered and haggard walls, but as late as 1710 it was in habitable 
condition, and was then described by Hamilton of Wishaw as " ane 
noble castle." During Cromwell's administration in Scotland, it 
was the occasional residence of "Duchess Ann" and her sister 
Susan, when they were expelled from Hamilton Palace, and the 
estates were under forfeiture. In the more prosperous days which 
succeeded she paid an annual visit to the Castle, and in a practical 
way remembered the kindness shown to her during the period of 
her sojourn. After the Restoration, and during the troublous 
times of the persecution, the Castle was used as a military station 
to over-awe the natives, who were staunch Covenanters. A leisurely 
stroll round the ruins, and a recollection of the past naturally 
suggests memories of Drumclog. The scene of the battle, which is 
reached after a drive of fully an hour through a pleasant pastoral 
tract of country, is thus graphically described by the late Rev. 
George Gilfillan : — 

" The country, around Drumclog, was then a dreary, desolate 
mixture of muirs and quagmires — -sullen brown and bright treacherous 
green alternating ; with high but heavy fells above, and deep morasses 
and rough streams below — Loudon Hill stands up king of the desolation, 
looking down, however, upon the straths of Avon and of Clyde, and up, 
'with awful reverence prone,' to his monarch on the east, the gigantic 
Tinto. In the heart of these dark wolds, there met, on Sabbath 
morning, the first of June (1679). a very singular assembly. It consisted 
of neighbouring Presbyterian peasants, mingled, however, with fugitives 
from various parts of the country — some on horseback, and almost all 
armed. We recognise in yonder stern-faced man, with broad blue 
bonnet, and red hair, seated like a pillar on his horse, and keeping his 
eye fixed upon the distant hill, John Balfour, of Burley, who has come 
hither from Loch Leven and Magus Muir, in search of safety. Near 
him is a taller man, of military appearance : it is Colonel Cleland. 
That tall thin man with the black hair is Hackstoun, and beside him 
you descry the portly form of Robert Hamilton, who has retreated from 
the bonfire at Rutherglen to these moors; The service of the day has 
commenced, and Douglas is denouncing the evils of tyranny, when, 
hark! a watchman, posted upon the neighbouring height, tires his 
carbine and runs toward the meeting. The sign of danger is recognised 
— the preacher pauses— the armed men fall into position — and the 
women and the children retire to the rear. Burley, Cleland, and 
Hamilton busy themselves in arranging their troops ; so that when 
Claverhouse and his men cross Calder Hill they find the Covenanters 
posted to the utmost advantage, with a morass in front, a hill behind, 
the foot occupying the centre, and a company of horse occupying each 
of the flanks. Claverhouse sends a flag, summoning them to surrender. 
It is answered by a shout of defiance, and, after a short silence, the 
whole army breaks out in the, trumpet-like psalm beginning — 

" In Judan's land God is well known." 
Claverhouse and his men replied to it with a loud cheer, and rushed 
upon the morass. They were met by a close fire — staggered under it — 



35 

returned to the charge, and made several desperate but unsuccessful 
attempts to cross the bog. Failing in these, their leader next sent 
flanking parties to the right and the left. Cleland and Burley, who 
commanded upon the left, permitted the flanking party to cross the 
ditch, and then furiously assailed and cut them to pieces. At this 
moment there arrived John Nisbet, of Hardhill, one of the bravest of 
the Covenanters, who, himself a host, had been sent for in haste to his 
house, which was not far off, but was coo late for the beginning of the 
fray. He cried out instantly, 'Jump the ditch and charge the enemy.' 
Burley and he led the men across and attacked the right flank at the 
same time that Hamilton and Hackstoun brought the main body into 
full action in front. Claverhouse bore their shock bravely, and per- 
formed, it is said, prodigies of valour, the boldest of the Covenanters 
bearing back from him, and some crying out, ' He has the proof of lead 
— try him with silver or the cold steel.' He might, perhaps, have 
redeemed the fortunes of the day, had not a countryman, with a pitch- 
fork, maimed his horse. This threw his men into confusion, and it 
became a hopeless rout. Up Calder-hill, crestless, staggering on his 
mangled steed, surrounded by his men in the last state of disorder, and 
pursued by the Covenanting horse, rode the ' man of blood.' When he 
reached the village of Strathaven, the villagers rose and tried to cut off 
his retreat. He broke through them, however, leaving a dozen killed 
and wounded on the ground, and never rested till he reached Glasgow, 
whence he sent a letter, dated the 1st of June, although probably 
written after midnight, to the commander of the forces, giving a laconic 
and curious account of his defeat. He owns to have lost eight or ten 
men, besides wounded, of his company ; but says that the dragoons lost 
many more. By comparing all accounts, the entire loss of the royal 
army in this memorable skirmish must have been about forty or fifty, 
and that of the Covenanters amounted to at least a dozen. It was the 
first and the last battle ever lost by Claverhouse." 

An agreeable change of route from Loudon Hill is to take the 
road from Strathaven to Hamilton, and thence by way of Mother- 
well to Wishaw. 

Y.-BOTHWELL-THE BRIDGE, THE CHURCH, AND 
THE CASTLE, &c. 
Loudon Hill and the Battle of Drumclog recall the subsequent 
disaster at Bothwell ; and a drive to that locality naturally suggests 
itself as a fitting sequel to the one described in the previous chapter. 
The road leads through Motherwell and Hamilton, and at a distance 
of about half-a-mile from the capital of the Middle Ward the scene 
of the famous battle is reached. The victory at Drumclog had 
inspired the Covenanters with hope and courage, and at Bothwell 
Bridge they gathered in great strength from all parts of the country. 
A large body of troops, under the Duke of Monmouth and Claverhouse, 
was despatched to check them. They had posted themselves on 
the southern bank of the Clyde, barricaded the bridge, and placed 
cannons in positions so as to rake it. Unfortunately, immediately 
before the battle, discord broke out among the different religious 
factions in the Covenanting army, and even when the day of the 
fight came, the preachers of the various factions were inculcating 
their peculiar views upon their followers amid the din and smoke 



36 

of battle. " Here Hackstoun maintained his post with zeal and 
courage ; nor was it until all his ammunition was expended, and 
every support denied him by the General, that he reluctautly 
abandoned the important pass. When his party were drawn back, 
the Duke's army, with their cannon in front, slowly defiled along the 
bridge, and formed in line of battle as they came over the river. 
The Duke commanded the foot, and Claverhouse the cavalry. It 
would seem that these movements could not have been performed 
without at least some loss, had the enemy been serious in opposing 
them. But the insurgents were otherwise employed. With the 
strangest delusion that ever fell upon devoted beings, they chose 
those precious moments to cashier their officers, and select others in 
their room. In this important operation they were at length 
disturbed by the Duke's cannon, at the very first discharge of which 
the horse of the Covenanters wheeled and rode off, breaking and 
trampling down the ranks of the infantry in their flight. Monmouth 
humanely issued orders to stop the effusion of blood ; but Claver- 
house, burning to avenge his defeat and the death of his cornet and 
kinsman at Drumclog, made great slaughter among the fugitives, of 
whom four hundred were slain. Many of the fugitives found shelter 
in the wooded parks round Hamilton Palace. More than a thousand 
were taken prisoners, numbers afterwards suffering cruel torture or 
perishing on the scaffold. Great changes have since been made in 
the vicinity of Bothwell Bridge. The gateway, gate, and house of 
the bridge- warden have long ago been removed. The old bridge 
was only twelve feet broad, but in 1826 twenty-two feet were added 
to its breadth. The open park in which the Covenanters were 
posted is now changed into enclosed fields and plantations ; and the 
moor upon which the royal army advanced to the engagement is 
now a cultivated and beautiful region, verifying even better now 
than formerly the words — ■' 0, Bothwell Bank, thou bloomest fair.' " 
Leaving the scene of the disaster, and proceeding towards 
Bothwell, a view is obtained in passing of the spacious expanse of 
Bothwell-haugh, formerly the property of James Hamilton, who 
shot the Regent Murray at Linlithgow in 1569. Near the centre of 
the village is Bothwell Kirk. The old manse adjacent was, it may 
be recollected, the birthplace of one of the most eminent of Scot- 
land's poetesses, Joanna Baillie. The parish church, a handsome 
structure in the Gothic style, was erected in 1833. At the east end 
is the chancel of the ancient kirk, which is practically all that 
remains of one of the finest specimens of the ecclesiastical archi- 
tecture of other days. It is tempting to linger in the quaint old 
graveyard, and pore over some of the strikingly curious and 
suggestive inscriptions on some of the tombstones ; but time presses 
if the visitor wishes to see to advantage the castle, which is the 
place of chief interest connected with the drive to Bothwell. Haif- 
a-mile from the entrance-lodge, midway between the villages of 
Bothwell and Uddingston, leading through a magnificent gateway 
(surmounted by a carving of the Douglas arms) stands the modern 
mansion, of no very great architectural dimensions, but very com- 



37 

moclious. At a short distance to the left, on the sloping wooded 
banks of the Clyde, are the stately castle ruins, the extent of which 
at once arrests attention. They are 234 feet long and 100 feet broad, 
the outer walls being some 15 feet thick, and in certain places 60 
feet high. " No doubt in its palmy days it was a good deal bigger, 
for the outer works which protected it on the side farther from the 
river have been entirely removed. Some of the rooms are unusually 
large and lofty for a fortress. The chapel, which is tolerably entire, 
is 50 feet long, and lighted by a series of graceful pointed 
windows, parts of whose delicate tracery can still be seen." A deep 
well or dungeon is also pointed out. From the crevices of the 
massive walls and the crumbling towers may be seen peeping forth 
the wall-flower, the nettle, and the ivy, and the branches afford a 
lodgment for the starling, the owl, and the jack-daw. To quote 
from John Wilson's poem of " The Clyde " — ■ 

" The tufted grass lines Bothwell's ancient hall, 
The fox peeps cautious from the creviced wall, 
Where once proud Murray, Clydesdale's ancient lord, 
A mimic sovereign held the festal board." 

With regard to the origin of the Castle of Bothwell, which forms 
the most imposing relic of feudal architecture which our country 
can boast, little is now known. It appears in history as early as the 
thirteenth century, and the lands afterwards passed from the 
Murrays to the Douglases. In their hands they remained till the 
forfeiture of that family in 1455, when they fell to the Crown. 
After that they passed to various favourites. James III. gave them 
to Sir John Ramsay, James IV. to Patrick Hepburn, Lord Hailes, 
who again restored them to the Douglases in exchange for the 
castle and lands of Hermitage on the border. Thus it came to pass 
that though the Earldom of Bothwell was twice forfeited after this, 
first in the person of James Hepburn, the murderer of Darnley, and 
again in the case of Francis Stewart, the grand conspirator and 
raid-maker in the days of James VI., who wrought such oppression 
in Orkney and Shetland to build his castles of Kirkwall and 
Scalloway, yet, in consequence of this exchange, the lands and 
castles of Bothwell continued with the house of Douglas, and have 
now passed to the Earl of Home, whose mother was the heiress of 
the last Duke of Douglas. 

Opposite the majestic ruins of the Castle may be seen all that 
now remains of Blantyre Priory (the approach to which is closed to 
the public). " The Clyde here is a majestic river, of considerable 
depth, and of a darkish colour, gliding smoothly and silently along 
between the lofty wooded banks, and beautiful and richly adorned 
undulating fields of Bothwell and Blantyre. Immediately below 
Bothwell Bridge the banks present a thin sprinkling of wood with 
occasional orchards. About a mile and a half farther down, in a 
snug retreat almost concealed by the rising ground on either side, 
the lofty walls of Blantyre Works appear ; where a busy population, 
and the rushing noise of machinery, contrast strangely with the 
silence and repose of the surrounding scenery ; and seem as if 



38 

intended to bring into competition the works of Nature and of art. 
The lofty woods of Bothwell on the east and of Blantyre on the 
west, with the magnificent red walls and circular towers of the old 
Castle, and the shattered remains of the Priory, add greatly to the 
beauty of the scenery. A little farther on, the banks begin to 
decline before they reach Daldowie, and the river leaves the parish 
amid fertile fields and wide expanding haughs. The whole on a 
summer day, when the sun is shining, is inexpressibly beautiful." 

VI. -HAMILTON PALACE, CADZOW FOREST, &c. 
There is no particular fascination in a drive to Hamilton. The 
way thither leads through clusters of colliery rows, only a passing 
glimpse of the fine old woods of Dalzell in the distance relieving the 
landscape of its sombreness. Neither does the town itself possess 
attractions to reward the visitors. Were it not that in the neigh- 
bourhood are the Palace, the ducal Mausoleum, Cadzow Forest, and 
Chatelherault, it would not be worth while to put it on the list. 
With these sights in prospect, however, it would be unpardonable 
not to devote to them a pleasant summer day. No one now gets 
admission to the interior of the palace without a special order from 
the Duke's commissioner, butsince ithasbeen dismantled of more than 
three hundred thousand pounds worth of its art treasures, the dis- 
appointment felt by the visitor at his exclusion is not so great as 
formerly. Though much of the glory has departed, there still find 
a place in the princely rooms of the palace a wonderful collection of 
the beautiful — unique cabinets, old china, costly gems in furniture, 
curious and rare books and manuscripts, and paintings by the great 
masters. There was a universal wail of regret in Scottish art circles 
when it was announced that Rubens' famous "Den of Lions" (on 
which Wordsworth composed his well-known sonnet) was among 
the pictures disposed by the auctioneer's hammer ; but happily a 
stroke of luck fell to the Duke in connection with the painting. It 
went at the sale for £5,145, but shortly afterwards his Grace bought 
it back, and it is said netted £2000 by the transaction. Near the 
Palace (which is admittedly one of the finest specimens of classic 
architecture in the world) stands the Mausoleum, erected at a cost 
of £130,000, from designs by David Bryce in imitation of the Castle 
of St. Angelo at Rome. The chapel door, on the western side of 
the building, usually is the first object which catches the eye of the 
visitor, and is of itself an interesting study. The panels, six in 
number, cast in bronze by Sir John Steell, R.S.A., are admirable 
fac similes of those on the celebrated gates of Ghiberti, in the 
Baptistry of Florence, and represent six Scripture subjects — the 
Queen of Sheba's reception by Solomon ; David Slaying Goliath and 
Flight of the Philistines ; Isaac Blessing Jacob, and Esau entering 
from the Hunt ; Joseph and his Brethren in Egypt, and the Finding 
of the Cup in Benjamin's Sack ; Moses on the Mount, and the 
carrying of the Ark across the Jordan. Inside the chapel is a 
sarcophagus, containing the embalmed body of the tenth Duke of 
Hamilton — a relic of great antiquity— brought from the land of the 



39 

Pharaohs. The circular-shaped chapel is of considerable height, 
and an awe-inspiring influence is produced by the powerful echo 
from the dome, as it responds to " the slightest whisper or the 
gentlest footfall." As we leave the chapel and pass round the piazza 
before descending the stairs, two colossal lions, marvellously 
chiselled in freestone, are observed majestically guarding the 
catacombs beneath. Over the entrance are exquisitely carved masks, 
the work of Mr Handyside Ritchie, of Edinburgh, representing Life, 
Death, and Immortality. " Life is adorned with a chaplet of fruit 
and flowers ; and on the lower portion of the stone is part of a clock 
dial, with the indicator pointing to the hour of twelve. Death is 
crowned with poppy heads, and a variety of flowers ; over the 
mouth is placed the dread seal of everlasting silence, a finger rising 
obliqely upwards over the lips ; the eyes are forever closed in • the 
sleep that knows no. waking,' and the expression of the face is awe- 
inspiring and effective. Immortality forms a vivid contrast to the 
other masks, especially that of Death ; the head is crowned with 
lilies, and the brow encircled with the serpent, emblematic of 
eternity ; while immediately above is the Greek symbol of immor- 
tality, a butterfly." In the vaults repose the remains of Scotland's 
premier Dukes. If time permitted, a whole day might be spent in 
the pleasure grounds surrounding the Mausoleum and the Palace ; 
but it is well not to linger here if it is intended to visit the venerable 
oaks of Cadzow and the ruins of the Castle. The way thither leads 
through the town a distance of a mile, and the drive past railways 
and coalpits, with their smuttiness and din, only heightens the 
pleasure which the visitor feels when once he is fairly in the heart 
of the "forest primeval." As is well-known, this forest is now 
the only remaining patch of the great Caledonian Forest which in 
olden times stretched over the whole of Upper Clydesdale and the 
valley of the Tweed as far as the English Border. The oaks cover 
several hundred acres, and are of such immense girth that in one of 
them at least — the famous " boss tree " — a party of eight can easily 
accommodate themselves. No more favourite study for the painter 
is to be found in Scotland than these old oak trees, with their 
" gnarled, knotted, doddered trunks, now wearing a faint girdle of 
green leaves, and now a slight wreath a-top — their arms mostly 
bare, as if they lifted them up to entreat for yet a space to live on 
amid the changed conditions of the world around them." Beneath 
these old oaks range " black-muzzled, black-eared, black-eyed, wild 
white cattle " — the last surviving descendants of the wild cattle 
that formerly roamed through the forest solitudes of Northern 
Britain. Near the oaks are the ruins of Cadzow Castle, situated on 
the precipitous banks of the Avon, and thus celebrated in Sir Walter 
Scott's fine ballad — 

" When princely Hamilton's abode, 

Ennobled Cadzow's Gothic towers, 
The song went round, the goblet flowed, 

And revel sped the laughing hours. 
Then, thrilling to the harp's gay sound, 

So sweetly rung each vaulted wall, 



40 

And echoed light the dancer's bound, 

As mirth and music cheered the hall. 
But Cadzow's towers, in ruins laid, 

And vaults by ivy mantled o'er, 
Thrill to the music of the shade 

Or echo Evan's hoaseer roar." 

History is silent as to who were the founders of the Castle, but 
since the days of Robert the Bruce it has continued, with few in- 
terruptions, in the hands of the Hamilton family. It seems to have 
been repaired at different times. The keep, with the fosse around 
it, and a well inside, are still in good preservation, and are all of 
polished stone of a reddish colour. Several vaults, and the walls 
probably of the chapel, are still visible. Opposite the ruins is the 
chateau or summer palace of Chatelherault, which, from its com- 
manding position, "fitly terminates the fine avenue of trees which 
stretches in direct vista from here to the Palace, and thence on to 
Bothwell. The chateau, with its turrets and extended front, looks 
more spacious than it really is. The principal gamekeeper occupies 
one wing, and the other is reserved for the use of the Duke when 
out shooting in the neighbourhood. The kennels are also located 
here. The walls of the chief apartments exhibit exquisite specimens 
of French decorative art, of the era of Louis Quatorze, in wood- 
carving and stucco. The truth-to-nature, lightness, delicacy, and 
elegance of these plaster pictures are exceedingly pleasing and 
impressive. They consist of scenes of rural life, of fruits and 
flowers, of mythologic figures, and others 

Smacking of Flora and the country green, 
Dance and provencal song, and sunburnt mirth." 

VII.-TINTO. 
Next to the Falls of Clyde and Cartland Crags there is probably 
no place in our district that has a greater fascination for the 
pleasure-seeker than Tinto-top. The drive to Lanark, either by 
way of Garrion Bridge and Clydesdale or Carluke, has already been 
described. Leaving the ancient town of Lanark by the Carlisle 
road, the first object of interest encountered is the ruined Church of 
St. Kentigern, which, with its tithes and pertinents, was granted 
by David I. in 1150 to the monks of Dryburgh, in whose possession 
it remained till the Reformation. It is said that it was in this 
church, at public worship, that Sir William Wallace first met 
Marion Braidfoot, the heiress of Lamington, who became his wife. 
There are six Gothic arches of the ruin still entire, and so are the 
south wall and parts of the east and west walls. In common with 
many other churches and abbeys of contemporary date, efforts have 
been made to preserve the ruins from utter decay. For the work of 
renovation we are mainly indebted to Mr Hugh Davidson, of 
Braedale, Lanark. About a mile farther on Lanark Loch is passed, 
then the racecourse, said to be one of the oldest in Scotland. 
Admirably fitted as it is for such a purpose, it is scarcety to be 
wondered at that some of our early sport-loving kings — who, by the 
way, probably formed their tastes in Rome — should have converted 



41 

this fine, well-drained plain into a royal racecourse. Lanark Castle 
was a favourite residence of many of the early Scottish kings. 
Hyndford Bridge, already referred to, is next passed. Turning to 
the left, the farms of Carmichael-mill and Mill-hill and the gatehouse 
to the mansion of Carmichael, the seat of the well-known county 
gentleman, Sir Wyndham Carmichael Anstruther, are successively 
passed. The road here is as level as a billiard table, and soon 
Thankerton Tollhouse is reached. Visitors have now reached the 
base of Tinto, or " the hill of fire," and although the ascent may be 
made from various points, the easiest and most accessible, all 
things considered, is probably that starting from the Tollhouse. 
Leaving horses and machine in charge of one or other of the 
hospitable country folk, the ascent is begun in earnest. From this 
point the rise is very gradual, but if the track is not followed, the 
walk up soon becomes tiresome. After toiling on for half an hour 
the first summit is reached, and here a short halt is made for 
luncheon. The view here is delightful, but it is only a foretaste of 
the grand panorama to be seen at the top. Resuming the upward 
journey, the path is now steeper and more fatiguing, and, at times, 
the top of the hill is entirely lost to view. After an exciting climb, 
Tinto top is reached at last, and visitors are rewarded for their long 
and toilsome ascent by a panoramic view, which, for expansiveness 
and variety of scenery, is second to none in Scotland. Far and near 
the view is enchanting. At the foot of the hill, on the south, lies 
the parochial village of Wiston, the principal building in which is 
the parish church — an edifice of considerable antiquity, whose early 
history is still shrouded in the mists of the past. The church bell 
bears the legend, " Cotswold, 1703," though what connection existed 
between Wiston parish and the watershed of the Thames and 
Severn is still matter for conjecture. In the churchyard may be seen 
an old stone bearing the lettering, "R.I., 1643," said to mark the 
resting-place of Richard Inglis, at one time minister of Wiston. 
The country around Wiston bears some traces of the Roman 
occupation, and it is thought that the village occupies the site of a 
Roman outpost. Farther away, the Clyde can be seen up to 
Abington ; and farther still, the top of Queensberry, in Dumbarton- 
shire, can be discerned as " through a glass darkly." To the east, 
the Culter Fells and the hilltops of the Lothians and Peeblesshire 
are seen. Then in the west, in fine weather, the hills that beautify 
the Firth of Clyde, including Goatfell, are distinctly visible. 
Indeed, in favourable conditions of the atmosphere, it is said that 
the German ocean may be seen on the one side, and the Firth of 
Clyde on the other. But while the distant views have a charm 
of their own, it is to the fairy landscape in the midst of which Tinto 
stands like a lone, gray sentinel, that the visitor turns with the 
liveliest satisfaction. The Links of the Forth are often spoken of 
with admiration ; but here are to be seen the Links of the Clyde 
stretching for miles like a serpentine chain of silver ; here are cosy 
villages and old-fashioned farmhouses, green fields, plantations, 
hedgerows — in short, all the accessories that go to beautify and 



42 

adorn a landscape. Not far off is a symmetrical eminence, 
Quothquhan Law, girded with a belt of pine, and bare on the top as 
becomes the veteran of a thousand years. Quothquhan was 
once a parish, but in 1660 it was united to that of Liberton. 
Another eminence of some note is Carmichael Hill, on which 
is a monument, bearing the following inscription : — " To the 
memory of John, the third Earl of Hyndford, born in the year 
1701, and departed this life the 19th July, 1767. In 1741, 
upon the King of Prussia invading Silesia, he was sent by his late 
Majesty, George the Second, as Envoy Extraordinary and plenipo- 
tentiary to that prince, and the year after reconciled the 
differences which had occasioned the war. Upon the conclusion of 
the treaty of Breslaw he was created a Knight of St. Andrew or the 
Thistle, and was invested at Charlottenberg, August 2nd, 1742, by 
the King of Prussia by virtue of a commission from the King of 
Great Britian. And as a testimony of the satisfaction of the con- 
tending powers, he received from the King of Prussia a Royal 
grant, dated at Berlin, September 30, 1742, for adding to his 
paternal coat of arms the Eagles of Siberia with the motto " Ex 
Bona Merito," which grant was ratified by a diploma from the 
Queen of Hungary and Bohemia, dated at Vienna, November 29th, 
1742. Both deeds were conceived in terms much to his Lordship's 
honour. His Lordship in 1744 went as an ambassador to the Court 
of Russia, where he continued till the end of the year 1749, and was 
greatly instrumental in accelerating the peace, concluded at Aix La 
Chapelle. On his return to Britain, he was appointed one of the 
Lords of the Bed Chamber of the Privy Council ; and in 1752, he 
was sent as an ambassador to the Court of Vienna. In 1761, he 
was, by His Majesty King George the Third, appointed Vice- 
Admiral of Scotland, and was one of the sixteen Peers of Scotland 
in four successive Parliaments. His Lordship, besides serving his 
country in a public capacity, was very beneficial to the place of his 
nativity, by employing for many years a great number of workmen 
in the many buildings and plantations which he carried on at Car- 
michael and Westraw, which will be a more lasting memorial of His 
Lordship than this stone which is erected to his memory by his 
widow, Jane, Countess Dowager of Hyndford." This motto shows 
that a gentleman of eminence was a native of the district of Tinto. 
The sun has now sunk towards the horizon, warning visitors that it 
is time to prepare for the^homeward journey. The descent is made 
with much greater celerity than the ascent, and soon Tinto, already 
obscured by gathering mist as when Ramsay saw it, is left behind — 
" Adorned with diadem of dawning's cloud, 

Hail ! Tinto, stately monarch of the scene, 
Ten thousand years hast thou beheld, unbowed, 

Clyde roll his waves, the rugged banks between, 

Yet look'st as everlasting, as serene, 
As when the pillars of thy strength were laid. 

Child of the earthquake ! frequent hast thou seen 
Those deeds of darkness Druid rites displayed, 
When Nature stood aghast, and Truth retired dismayed " 



3nt)U0trics of the District 



Advertising is to business what steam is to machinery, the grand 
propelling power. " — Macaulay. 



Qhe Wisbaw pvess 

ant> Hbvertiser. 

( Established 1870.) 




SCALE OF CHARGES. 

Miscellaneous Wants of all Kinds. 



Prepaid, 18 Words, os 6<\. 

,, 27 ,, is od 

,, 36 ,, is 6d. 

45 .» 2S od - 



Credit, 18 Words. 
27 „ 
36 „ 
45 ,. 



...is oa. 
...is 6d. 
...2s od. 
...2s 6d. 



For each Q words additional, 3d. 

Notice of Birth, Marriage, or Death (not exceeding 27 words) — 
Prepaid, is ; Credit, is 6d. 

Ordinary Advertisements, 3d per Line of Space. 

Public, Legal, and Statutory Notices, 4d per Line. 

Municipal and County Council Election Addresses and 
Notices — 6d per Line. 

Parliamentary Election Addresses and Notices, 8d per Line. 

For a Series of Trade Advertisements, Special Terms on Application. 



PUBLISHING OFFICE: POST-OFFICE BUILDINGS. 
PRINTING WORKS : PARK STREET. 



Notices of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, and other Advertise- 
ments received for all the Daily and Weekly Papers. 




INDUSTRIES OF THE DISTRICT. 



tPJff EFORE the starting of the Iron and Steel- Works- 
now such important factors in the welfare of the 
district — the industries of Cambusnethan parish 
chiefly consisted of quarrying and coal-mining. The 
Wishaw quarries have now been worked out, and most of the pits 
that produced the once famous Wishaw coal are dismantled — the 
localities in which they were placed being still marked by tumuli 
which may one day prove as puzzling and as interesting to the 
future geologist as the "kitchen-middens" of a bygone race are to 
the antiquarian of the present day. There is still, however, a great 
amount of mineral wealth in the district, and although the upper 
coal has been pretty much exhausted, there are inrlications that, 
before long attempts will be made to exploit the lower coal measures, 
as yet, practically untouched. While the centre of the coal trade 
has shifted to Hamiltou, Blantyre, Both well, &c, the introduction 
into the district of new iron and steel industries more than compen- 
sated for the diminished output of coal, and the consequent migra- 
tion of miners from the parish. There are still a few old residenters 
in the town who fondly recall an earlier period in the history of 
Wishawtown the good old limes when the click of the weaver's 
shuttle was heard issuing from houses in the main thoroughfares 
where now palatial buildings are occupied by thriving merchants — 
when the smoke of the furnaces had not as yet begrimed the fairest 
scenery in Scotland, and the throb of the pit-engines had not broken 
the quiet restfulness of pastoral existence. Truly the spirit of 
change has thrown its mantle over the parish of Cambusnethan, and 
if some Rip Van Winkle of the last century were to revisit his 
birth-place well might he cry, " The homes of my youth, where are 
they ?" and echo answered, " Where are they ?" 

GLASGOW IRON AND STEEL WORKS. 

These works constitute one of the most important undertakings in 
which the Burgh of Wishaw is interested. The blast-furnaces were 
originally erected by Mr Bell, now of Cliftonhall, and were purchased 
by the Glasgow Iron Company from Lord Belhaven in 186(>, as an 
adjunct to their works at Motherwell and St. Bollox. In 1878 an 
important addition was made to the works by the installation, at 
great cost, of plant for the manufacture of steel by the basic process. 



46 

This branch of the business has been carried on with great energy 
and in the face of many difficulties ; but at present, owing to the 
depression in the steei trade, and the necessity of laying down new 
plant, active work in this department has been temporarily sus- 
pended. As soon, however, as the necessary structural alterations 
and improvements have been effected, it is expected that the manu- 
facture of steel by Siemens' process will be carried on with all the 
energy for which the directors of this company have so long been 
favourably known. A feature of the company's works is the slag 
grinding mill. Until quite recently, the slag produced in the 
manufacture of steel was looked upon as a waste product, but 
having been found to contain a large amount of phosphate of lime 
its great importance as a fertilising agent came to be recognised. 
The slag is pulverised by a series of mill-stones until the resulting 
" dust " reaches such a degree of fineness that 85 per cent, will pass 
through a mesh screen having 10,000 holes to the square inch. In 
this condition the phosphate is largely used by the leading 
agriculturists in Great Britain and Germany. The company also 
employ a large number of men in connection with their pits, and 
carry on brickworks capable of turning out 3,500 composition 
bricks per day — the output being almost exclusively used for the 
re-lining of their furnaces, &c. With a management always on the 
outlook for the latest improvements in machinery, and ready to 
seize upon and utilise the most recent advances in science, there is 
every reason to expect that the Glasgow Iron and Steel Company 
will go on increasing the sphere of its operations, bringing prosperity 
to the toiling multitude, whose welfare is the welfare of our town 
and district. 

PATHEE IRON AND STEEL WORKS. 

Started by a local syndicate, about thirteen years ago, this under- 
taking has fully realised the expectations of its promoters. The 
works have contributed largely to the prosperity of the town, 
thanks to the ability of the directorate. The company employ a 
large number of hands, and in spite of the prevailing depression, it 
is gratifying to know that the firm have retained their hold on the 
markets at a time when many similar concerns are suffering severely 
from the fall in prices and the general paucity of orders. The com- 
pany have now a wide business connection, exporting iron and steel 
plates to such distant countries as India, America, Australia, and 
New Zealand, as well as to many European States. 

BELHAVEN IRON AND STEEL AND PATENT NAIL WORKS. 

Perhaps no industry in the district has advanced with greater 
strides than that of nail-making. Little more than eight years have 
elapsed since a few spirited townsmen launched the Belhaven Iron 
& Steel & Patent Nail Company. The nail manufacture was then 
largely a monopoly of English makers, but the establishment of the 
Belhaven Works, simultaneously with the opening of works of a kin- 
dred nature in other parts of the country, created a uew industry in 
Scotland which has, year by year, assumed larger proportions. Two 



47 

years ago, the business of the firm had increased to such an extent 
that the management found it necessary to make important and 
costly additions to their plant. A new rolling mill was laid down, 
enabling the firm to manufacture their own steel strips, as well as 
to make iron and steel bars of every description for the requirements 
of the general trade. In addition to supplyiug the home trade, the 
company export their nails to the Colonies and to China. 

ETNA IRON AND STEEL WORKS. 

Originally known as the Brandon Iron Works, this business was 
taken over about three years ago by Messrs Kerr & Wotherspoon, 
under whose judicious management the concern has rapidly developed 
into one of the most important in the district. The re-opening of the 
works, contemporaneously with the starting of the Lanarkshire 
Steel Works at Flemington, was a most fortunate occurrence for 
Craigneuk, to whose prosperity and population it largely contributed. 

EXCELSIOR IRON WORKS. 

These well-known iron works were establised nearly 30 years ago by 
Messrs J. Williams & Co. One of the pioneers of the nail industry in 
Scotland, this firm have long been known for the excellence and 
variety of their manufactures, and like most of the local firms 
engaged in the iron and steel industries, their name is well known 
beyond the confines of the United Kingdom. The firm make a 
speciality of nails, staples, fencing wire, strips, &c. 

COLTNESS IRON WORKS. 

The Coltness Iron Works, Newmains, are probably the largest of 
their kind in Scotland. In addition to the furnaces, the iron and 
steel foundries, and the tar and ammonia works, all carried on at 
Newmains, the Company likewise own extensive collieries in 
various parts of the country, and carry on a large brick-making 
industry. Altogether, the firm are amongst the largest employers 
of labour in Scotland. In recent years, extensive additions have 
been made to the Works, the number of furnaces having been 
increased by four ; and in 1891, what was practically a new 
industry was created by the erection, at great cost, of tar and 
ammonia plant capable of treating the gases produced by six 
furnaces. Under the old system, the gases emitted by the furnaces 
(about one hundred millions of cubic feet daily) were allowed to 
carry off their wealth of tar and oil and ammonia, and it was to 
extract these " waste products " from this immense volume of gas 
that the new works were laid down. To effect this, an extensive 
system of condensing and cooling plant was erected on what is 
known as the " peebles " principle. After a series of condensations 
and distillations, the resulting products, in their purified form, are 
lucigen oil, pitch, extensively used for asphalting and briquette- 
making, and sulphate of ammonia, largely used as a fertiliser by 
agriculturists. Under capable management, this gigantic under- 
taking has prospered exceedingly, and it is hoped that the new 
venture upon which the Company have so recently embarked will 
add still more to the wealth and prosperity of the district. 



48 

MR BELL'S ENGINEERING WORKS. 

About 30 years ago, when the rapid development of the iron and 
coal industries had given an impetus to the demand for machinery, 
the engineering works of the late Mr John Bell and Messrs Shearer 
& Pettigrew were started almost simultaneously on ground still 
occupied by them near the Wishaw Iron Works. In neither 
case was the beginning a pretentious one ; but through the enter- 
prise of both firms, the undertakings increased rapidly, and from 
time to time additions were made to the original buildings, until 
they assumed their present dimensions. Mr Bell made the manu- 
facture of wagon-wheels one of the most important parts of his 
business, and this branch of industry is still a leading speciality of 
the firm. The business carried on, however, embraces almost all 
departments of the engineering trade, and the workshops are 
replete with modern appliances of the best type — many of them the 
outcome of the late Mr Bell's inventive genius. Of the many 
patents owned by the firm, perhaps the most important is the com- 
bined equilibrium regulating governor and stop valve, which has 
been successfully adapted to electi ic lighting and other appliances 
requiring continuity and steadiness of power. 

MESSRS SHEARER & PETTIGREW'S WORKS. 

Established in 1856 by Mr Andrew Shearer and Mr William 
Pettigrew, both of whom had acquired considerable practical 
experience in iron-founding at the Coltness Iron Works, Newmains, 
the works consisted of an iron foundry simply, but in the course of 
time the department of engineering was added— necessitating a 
large extension of premises. The work now turned out comprises 
many kinds of castings and machinery, from the huge fly-wheel of 
a horizontal engine to the delicate mechanism of the engine itself. 
The firm make a speciality of winding engines for pits, for the 
mechanical excellence of which they have been long famous. 

BELHAVEN WORKS. 

The firm of Robert Morton & Sons, Belhaven Works, are widely 
known as the manufacturers of bakers' and confectioners' machinery, 
of which the late Mr Morton was the inventor and patentee. Mr 
Morton's inventive genius produced many useful appliances, which 
found their way readily into the best bakeries of the kingdom, 
including the Royal Dockyards bakeries, the Royal Military 
Training College, &c. The patents owned and worked by the firm 
are so many that to enumerate them would occupy considerable 
space, but perhaps the most important is the " Morton " whisk and 
cake-maker, which is manufactured from the smallest to the largest 
size, capable of beating 500 eggs. Large numbers of the whisks are 
exported to Australia and other distant countries. 

MESSRS R. Y. PICKERING & CO 'S WAGON-WORKS. 

About four years ago, the directors of this firm removed the bulk of 
their work from Rawyards, Airdrie, to their extensive works at 
Wishaw South Station. Since then the works have been carried on 
with commendable spirit, prospering exceeding and reflecting 



49 

credit on the energy and business capacity of the management. 
Mr Russell's wagon- works at Clydesdale are also carried on 
successfully, and employ a goodly number of hands. 

CLYDESDALE DISTILLERY. 

A good deal has been said about the celebrity which the district has 
attained in connection with its coal, iron, steel, and kindred 
industries of engineering and iron-founding, but it is not alone for 
these that Wishaw has been famous in the markets of the world. 
" Wishaw coal" used to be a name to conjure with, but within 
recent years "Clydesdale malt whisky" has become even better 
known in the bazaars and marts of commerce as a product of 
Wishaw manufacture. The erection of the Distillery was one of 
those early enterprises of the late Lord Belhaven, which, like the 
working of the coalfields, the starting of the blast-furnaces, and 
other well-meant schemes for promoting the trade of the town, 
proved unprofitable in his hands. Erected at a cost of not less than 
£60,000, the Distillery soon passed into the hands of Patrick 
Chalmers (brother of the celebrated Dr Chalmers), on whose demise, 
in 1854, the works were leased and afterwards purchased by his 
son-in-law, Mr J. Munro Mackenzie of Mornish and Calgary, the 
senior partner of the present firm. Many additions and improve- 
ments have been made to the works by the present management, 
one of the most recent being a new bonded warehouse capable of 
storing 150,000 gallons of whisky. The bonding capacity of the 
establishment is enormous : probably not less than eight or ten 
thousand casks could be safely stowed away in the warehouses. It 
is interesting to know that, as in the Highland distilleries, the fuel 
used for heating the kilns is peat. The peat, which is obtained 
from Greenhead Moss, imparts an aroma of its own to the grain, 
and possesses many advantages over coal, coke, &c. 

MESSRS W. HUDSPITH'S BRICK AND FIRE CLAY WORKS. 

Started more than half a century ago, these works passed through 
many hands, and it was not until 1864 that the present firm entered 
into possession of them. Messrs Hudspith & Co. manufacture fire- 
clay goods of almost every description, including chimney cans, 
troughs, glazed pipes, coping, vases, garden borders, &c, besides 
bricks of various kinds. The fire-clay is obtained from the firm's 
Green Colliery, adjoining Wishaw South Station. 

MESSRS LOUDON & RUSSELL'S FIRE-CLAY WORKS. 

Situated at Morningside, these works have been considerably ex- 
tended in recent years. Besides the manufacture of ordinary fire- 
clay goods, this firm have devoted a great amount of attention to 
the production of terra-cotta and horticultural ware of a highly 
artistic design. 

MESSRS P. M'INNES & CO.'S COACH WORKS. 

Coach building is carried on pretty extensively at these works 
in Marshall Street. The firm's specialty is the "Avondale Car" — a 
well-designed conveyance of which the principal feature is a novel 
arrangement of the seats. This vehicle has already proved very 



50 

popular, and when more widely known ought to increase in favour. 
The design has been protected by registration. 

MR KING'S CONFECTIONERY WORKS. 

These works were started by the late Mr A. King in Kirk Road, 
but as the business increased it was found necessary to remove to 
more commodious premises in King Street, where the works have 
been located for more than 20 years. About four years ago the 
works were partly destroyed by fire, but were immediately re-built. 
The factory is fitted up with machinery of the most modern type 
for the manufacture of almost every kind of confection known to 
the sweet-toothed public. In addition to the appliances for the 
manufacture of confectionery, the works comprise all the necessary 
plant for the making of preserves. The manufactures of the firm 
are favourably known over a wide area. 

MESSRS M 'ARTHUR & CO.'S FACTORY. 

A few years ago the well-known firm of D. M'Arthur & Co., Glasgow, 
took a lease of the Templars' Hall, King Street, which they adapted 
to the purpose of a needle-work and tambouring factory. The want 
of an industry affording employment to women was often bewailed 
by those townspeople who could recall the palmy days of tambour- 
ing, and it was thought that in the course of time, if the experiment 
proved successful, Messrs M'Arthur would be encouraged to 
establish a permanent factory in our midst. So far, the hope has 
not been realised, but as new industries do not reach an all-round 
development at once it is hoped that the undertaking will grow on 
the hands of the firm, and that the erection of a large factory will 
fall to be recorded at some future date. 

COLLIERIES. 

Many of the collieries in the parish are owned or worked by the 
large iron and steel companies, notably, the Coltness Iron Company, 
and the Glasgow Iron and Steel Company. The collieries at 
Morningside, Law, Overtown, Clydesdale, and the Wishaw Estate 
Collieries are all in active operation. With regard to the latter, it 
was stated in the House of Commons in the evidence that was led 
in favour of the proposed extension of the North British Railway 
into the district that between two and three million tons of coal 
remained untouched in the Wishaw Estate coalfield. A new 
colliery (Clydesdale and Muirhouse) was opened near Clydesdale 
village about three years ago, and quite recently Mr Barr started 
Cam'nethan Colliery near Castlehill Feus. These new ventures 
have proved entirely successful, and when the present depression in 
the coal trade has passed away, it is more than likely that coal- 
mining in the district will take a new lease of life, that shafts will 
be sunk to the lower coal measures, and that once again Wishaw 
will become a mining centre. 

The above is a fairly comprehensive list of the chief industries 
of the district, and it may be taken to prove that we possess a fair 
share of shrewd, capable business men into whose keeping we may 
safely confide the future prosperity of our town and parish. 



Xocal 3n formation. 



53 



Mtsbaw post ©ffice. 



William Carmichael, 



Postmaster. 
Hours of Posting for — 



Wishaw (1st delivery) and Overtown, - 

All parts, 

Edinburgh, Glasgow, Hamilton, and West of 

Scotland, 

Wishaw (2nd delivery) and Newmains, 

Overtown, 

Glasgow and Motherwell, 

Wishaw (3rd delivery), 

Ireland and Foreign, 

England and South of Scotland, - - - - 
Glasgow and North of Scotland, .... 
England, South and East of Scotland, - 
Sunday Despatch to all parts, .... 



ORDINARY 


REGISTERED 


LETTERS. 


LETTERS. 


PARCELS 


6.45 A.M. 








8.40 „ 


8.20 a.m. 





12.33 p.m. 


12.13 p.m. 


12.15 P.M 


1.45 „ 


1.25 „ 


1.30 „ 


4.35 ,, 


4.15 „ 


4.20 ., 


5.0 ,, 


4.40 ,, 


4.30 „ 


5.45 „ 


5.20 „ 


5.25 ,, 


5.45 „ 


5.20 „ 





6.45 ,, 


6.25 „ 





8.50 „ 


8.0 „ 


8.0 ,, 


8.50 „ 


8.0 ,, 


8.0 ,, 


5.33 „ 


9 to 10 A.M. 






Beltonfoot, - 

Berryhill, .... 

Cambusnethan (Sub Office), 

Cambusnethan (Wall Box), 

Clydesdale, 

Glasgow Road (Sub Office), 

Kirk Road, - 

Stewarton Street, 

Waterloo, - 



Wall Letter-Boxes Close 
week days. 
8.20 a.m., 12, 3, & 7 p.m. 
8 A.M., 3 & 7.15 p.m. 
7.45 & 11.25 A.M., 3.35 & 6.40 P.M. 
7.50 & 11.30 a.m., 3.40 & 6.45 p.m. 
8 A.M., 2.50 P.M. 

8.25 A.M., 12.25, 4'.25, & 7.55 P.M. 
7.55 & 11.35 a.m., 3.45 & 6.50 P.M. 
8.30 A.M. 12.30, 4.30, & 8 P.M. 
11 A.M., 5.30 P.M. 



5.5 p.m 
5.10 ,, 



5.15 „ 
5.20 ,, 



NOTE. — Registered Letters and Parcels must not be posted in the Letter Boxes. 

HOURS OF BUSINESS. 

Ordinary business, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Sundays, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. 

Money Orders issued and paid, and Inland Revenue Licenses issued, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Savings Bank, Government Annuity and Insurance business 

transacted, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Postal Orders issued and paid, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Telegraph business transacted (including telegraph money orders), 7.30 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Sundays, - 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. 

LETTERS. 

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Jd for every 2oz. or part thereof. Greatest length, 18in. 

Newspapers, ^d each. 

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MONEY ORDERS. 
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54 

MINERS' WAGES per Day from 1848 to 1893. 

(Less Deductions for Rent, Coal, Doctor, School, and Sharpening Picks.) 
(School Fees Abolished 30th Sept., 1889.) 



1848- 


-2/7 per 


day. 


1856—4/3 per day. 




1864—4/ per day 


1849- 


-2/6 


, 


1857—4/ 




1865—4/6 


1850- 


-2/9 


9 


1858—3/ 




1866—5/6 


1851- 


-2/6 


, 


1859—3 3 




1867—4/9 


1852- 


-2/7 


, 


1860—3/6 




1868—3/9 


1853- 


-3/9 


, 


1861—3/ 




1869—3/9 


1854- 


-5/ 


, 


1862—3/6 




1870—3/9 


1855- 


-4/4 


, 


1863—3/6 




1871—4/6 




Fron 


May 1871 to Oct. 1871—4/6 
Oct. ,, to Dec. ,, — 5/ 
Dec. „ to May 1872—5/6 
May 1872 to June ,, —6/ 
June ,, to Aug. ,, — 7/ 
Aug. ,, to Sept. ,, — 8/ 
Sept. „ to Oct. ,, —9/ 
Oct. ,, to Dec. „ —10/ 
Dec. ,, to Strike —9/ 
Jan. 1873 to Feb. 1873—8/ 


per day. 




i> 


Feb. ,, to Mar. ,, —9/ 


99 




i » 


Mar. ,, to Mar. 1874—10/ 


99 




>> 


Mar. 1874 to Apr. „ —8/ 
Apr. „ to Apr. 1875—6/ 
Apr. 1875 to May 1876—5/ 


99 




,, 


May 1876 to Apr. 1877—4/6 


99 




IS 


Apr. 1877 to Feb. 1878—4/ 


99 




99 
99 


Feb. 1878 to Oct. ,, —3/9 
Oct. ,, to June 1879—3/6 


99 
99 




99 


June 1879 to Sept. „ —3/ 






99 


Sept. ,, to Oct. „ —3/6 


99 




99 
91 


Oct. „ to Dec. „ —4/6 
Dec. ,, to Jan. 1880—4/ 


99 




M 


Jan. 1880 to Mar. „ —5/3 


99 




99 


Mar. ,, to Apr. ,, — 5/ 


99 




99 


Apr. ,, to May ,, — 4/ 


91 




IS 

99 


May „ to June 1883—3/6 
June 1883 to July „ -4/6 
July „ to Jan. 1884—5/ 


99 
99 




ss 


Feb. 1884 to Mar. „ —4/6 


99 




1) 


Apr. „ to Apr. 1885—4/ 


99 




99 


Apr. 1885 to June 1886—3/6 


99 




,, 


June 1886 to Sept. „ —3/ 


99 




99 


Sept. ., to Mar. 1887—3/6 


99 




99 


Mar 


1887 to June 1887—4/ 


99 



55 



Sliding Scale adopted on basis of 4/3 per day. 

From 1 July 1887 to 1 June 1888—3/1 1 per day, reduction 7£% 

1 June 1888 to 1 Nov. „ —3/10 ,, ' ,, 10% 

1 Nov. „ to 15 ,, ,, —3/11 „ „ 7J% 

15 ,, ,, to 15 Dec. 1888—4/2 „ ,, 24% 

15 Dec. ,, to 15 Jan. 1889—4/4 „ addition 2*% 

15 Jan. 1889 to 17 Apr. „ —4/7 ,, „ 74% 

17 Apr. ,, to 19 June ,, — 4/54 „ ,, 5% 
19 June „ to 18 July ,, —4/7" „ „ 74% 

18 July ,, to 5 Sept. ,, —4/54 .. ». 5 % 
Strike, 5 to 11 Sept. — School Fees abolished 30 Sept. 

12 Sept. 1889 to 15 Oct. 1889—5/ per day, addition 174% 
Sliding Scale abandoned. 
From 15 Oct. 1889 to 6 Nov. 1889—5/6 per day. 
7 Nov. ,, to 30 Apr. 1892—6/ 
1 May 1892 to 15 Oct. „ —5/6 „ 
,, 17 Oct. ,, to 18 Feb. 1893—5/ 
,, 18 Feb. 1893 to date of publication— 4/6 

ZR^A.IHSTIF'^LILi, 1880-1892, 



1880 'SI '82 '83 '8h '85 '86 

Jan.— 1-4 0-5 3" 



Feb.— 2-15 20 2 

Mar.— 3 3 3 3 

Apl.— 2-2 5 I 

May— 0-7 19 1 

J'ne— 1-05 21 3 

July— 3-4 4-2 4 

Aug.— 0-5 3-6 1 

Sept.— 41 2-6 2 

Oct. —1-3 1-8 2 

Nov.— 5-0 4-4 4 

Dec— 3 2-3 3 



2 10 6 
6 1-7 2 
6 09 1 



2 
5 3 4 
2 1.4 



6 1 

6 I 
1 

■2 2 

7 3 
1 3 

8 3 
7 4 
2 



•5 

•5 2 

75 

•9 4 

•5 1 

•0 2 

•65 3 

■6 2 

•8 4 



'87 '88 

07 



•89 '90 '91 
1-45 4- 



4 1 
6 2 

75 

5 
■9 3 
•0 5 
2 

1 

4 i 




5 * 

Q 

9§ 
o 

hi 

•3 a 

o 

z 



11 z 

1-1 s 

0-6 

09 2 

03 1 

21 5 

32 1 

33 1 
1-6 1 
2-5 5 
DO 2 



;1 D6 

1-2 1 

•8 DO 

•4 25 2 

•4 0-5 2 

•0 2-5 3 

•8 4-5 3 

•1 11 2 

•8 2-5 2 

•0 1 -3 5 

•4 23 1 



•9 2-0 

•6 0-2 

•5 3-3 

75 2 

•7 D6 

3 D2 

•2 0-8 

•0 5-4 

•8 5-1 

•2 2 5 

•4 2 4 

•5 6-5 



'92 

2 

D9 
0-5 
0-6 
2-8 

3 3 
D6 
71 
27 
3 5 
2-5 
D5 



Total, 27-8 29 "2 34 "9 31-8 31 25 *22'3 18 "4 f2D7 22 45 30 85 31 "2 30 "0 



O For 10 Months. (t) For 9 Months. 



56 



£tsf of (JJtagififrafeB anb (poftce CommtB; 
eionere since Sormafion of Q£urg0 + 



C1T/.&F MAGISTRATES. 

James Miller, factor, from Sept. 1855 to Sept. 1858 

J. M. Mackenzie, distiller, from ... 1858 to ... 1861 

John Wardrop, merchant, from ... 1861 to ... 1864 

A. G. Simpson, coalmaster, from ... 1864 to ... 1870 

Robert Brand, coalmaster, from ... 1870 to ... 1873 

John Gilchrist, fruiterer, from ... 1873 to ... 1878 

William Anderson, coalmaster, from Nov. 1878 to Nov. 1887 

William Thomson, accountant, from ... 1887 to ... 1890 

Thomas Bell, coalmaster, from ... 1890. 

JUNIOR MAGISTRATES. 

J. M. Mackenzie, distiller, from Sept. 1855 to Sept. 1858 

John Wardrop, merchant, from ... 1855 to ... 1861 

Alexander Lothian, carpenter, from ... 1859 to ... 1864 

William Thomson, wood merchant,... from ... 1858 to Mar. 1859 

Do. do., ...from ... 1864 to Sept. 1868 

James Shirlaw, banker, from ... 1861 to ... 1863 

Do. do., from ... 1868 to ... 1870 

Thomas Dean, brick manufacturer, from ... 1863 to Aug. 1864 

John Marshall, mason, from ... 1864 to Sept. 1866 

Robert Livingstone, M.D., from 

Robert Pettigrew, merchant, from 

Wm. Hudspith, brick manufacturer,... from 

Robert Brand, coalmaster, from 

John Gilchrist, fruiterer, from 

Andrew Currie, clothier, from 

William Anderson, coalmaster, from ... 1872 to Nov. 1878 

Matthew Laurie, merchant, from ... 1873 to Sept. 1875 

William Buchanan, merchant, from ... 1875 to ... 1877 

Thomas Smith, ironmonger, from ... 1877 to May 1887 

William Simpson, coalmaster, from Nov. 1878 to Nov. 1881 

Robert Williams, ironmaster, from ... 1881 to ... 1883 

William Thomson, accountant, from ... 1883 to ... 1885 

Andrew Shearer, ironfounder, from ... 1885 to ... 1887 

Alexander Murdoch, brickbuilder, from May 1887 to ... 1889 

William Russell, grocer, from Nov. 1887. 

John Hamilton, grocer, from ... 1889 to ... 1890 

Malcolm Ross, architect, from ... 1890 to ... 1891 

Hugh Haran, ironmerchant, from ... 1891. 



1866 to 


.. 1868 


1867 to 


.. 1868 


1868 to 


.. 1869 


1869 to 


.. 1870 


1870 to 


.. 1873 


1871 to 


.. 1872 



57 

COMMISSIONERS. 

James Miller, factor, from Sept. 1855 to Sept. 1871 

John Wardrop, merchant, from ... 1855 to ... 1864 

J. M. Mackenzie, distiller, from ... 1855 to ... 1870 

A.G.Simpson, coalmaster, from ... 1855 to ... 1858 

Do. do,, from ... 1861 to ... 1873 

William Thomson, wood merchant, from ... 1855 to Mar. 1859 

Do. do., from ... 1862 to Sept. 1868 

Robert Gordon, grocer, from ... 1855 to ... 1856 

James Waddell, ^merchant, from ... 1855 to ... 1859 

James Smith, joiner, from ... 1855 to June 1860 

James Gibb, baker, from ... 1855 to Sept. 1858 

Thomas Dean brick manufacturer, from ... 1855 to Aug. 1864 

James Stewart innkeeper, from ... 1855 to Sept, 1857 

Robert Bell, coalmaster, from ... 1855 to ... 1862 

William Renwick, farmer from ... 1856 to ... 1865 

Do. do., from ... 1868 to ... 1871 

John M 'Nab, surgeon, from ... 1857 to ... 1860 

James Steel, mason, from ... 1858 to ... 1861 

John Marshall, mason from ... 1858 to ... 1866 

Robert Clark, innkeeper, from ... 1859 to ... 1862 

Alexander Lothian, carpenter, from Mar. 1859 to ... 1864 

Robert Brand, coalmaster, from June 1860 to .. 1863 

Do. do., from Sept. 1868 to ... 1873 

James Shirlaw, banker, from ... 1860 to ... 1863 

Do. do., from ... 1867 to ... 1880 

Robert Pettigrew, merchant, from ... 1862 to ... 1868 

Do. do from ... 1872 to ... 1874 

John Thomson, wood merchant, from ... 1863 to ... 1869 

John Kirkland, merchant, from ... 1863 to ... 1869 

Robert Livingstone, M.D., from ... 1864 to ... 1873 

William Currie, clothier, from ... 1864 to ... 1867 

Thomas Brownlie, draper, from ... 1864 to ... 1868 

Benjamin Pender, innkeeper, from ... 1865 to ... 1868 

Do. do from ... 1871 to ... 1873 

Wm. Hudspith, brick manfacturer,...from ... 1866 to ... 1869 

John Ritchie, ironmonger, from ... 1868 to ... 1871 

William Watson, spirit merchant, from ... 1868 to ... 1871 

Do. do. from ... 1874 to ... 1876 

Daniel Rankin, builder, from ... 1869 to ... 1872 

John Gilchrist, fruiterer, from 1869 to Nov. 1881 

John Moffat, mason, from ... 1871 to Sept. 1874 

Thomas Forsyth, joiner, from ... 1870 to ... 1872 

Andrew Currie, clothier, from ... 1870 to ... 1877 

James Watt, baker, from ... 1869 to ... 1871 

Do. do from ... 1873 to Nov. 1885 

Matthew Laurie, merchant, from ... 1872 to Sept. 1875 

William Simpson, baker, from ... 1873 to Nov. 1881 

William Anderson, coalmaster, from ... 1872 to ... 1887 



58 



William Buchanan, merchant, from Sept. 1874 to Sept. 

Thomas Smith, ironmonger, from ... 1871 to May 

James Hunter, innkeeper, from ... 1875 to Sept. 

Do. do. from ... 1878 to Nov. 

Thomas Steel, joiner, ^ from ... 1874 to ... 

William Thomson, accountant, from ,.. 1873 to 

T. Smith, engineer, from ... 1876 to Sept. 

John Lindsay, joiner, from ... 1872 to ... 

Andrew Wingate, baker, from ... 1871 to ... 

John Ross, flesher, from ... 1871 to ... 

George Murray, excise officer, from .. 1876 to May 

Robert Williams, ironmaster, from ... 1877 to Nov. 

Do. do from Nov. 1884 to 

John Kerr, portioner, from Sept. 1877 to 

Andrew Shearer, ironfounder, from Nov. 1878 to 

Alexander King, confectioner, from ... 1880 to 

Alexander Murdoch, brick-builder, from ... 1880 

John Ferguson, baker, from ... 1881 to 

Do. do from ... 1886 to 

Thomas Bell, coalmaster, from ... 1882 to 

Robert Douglas, portioner, from ... 1883 to 

Malcolm Ross, architect, from ... 1884 to 

James Riddell, coalmaster, from ... 1885 to 

James Govan, merchant, from Jany. 1886 to 

David M'Queen, factor, from Nov. 1886 

William Russell, grocer, from ... 1881 

Thos. Campbell, painter, from May 1887 to Nov. 

James Fallow, from Nov. 1887 to ... 

Matthew Cleland, spirit merchant, from ... 1887 

Henry Nimmo, butcher, from ... 1887 to ... 

John Hamilton, grocer, from ... 1887 to 

John Williams, from ... 1887 

John F. M'Chrystal, spirit merchant,. .from ... 1887 to ... 

Thos. B. Watt, house factor, from ... 1890 to Dec. 

Thomas Bell, coalmaster, from ... 1890 

Hugh Haran, iron merchant, from ... 1890 

John Wallace, draper, from ... 1891 

Charles Canning, from ... 1891 

John Gibson, engineer, from .. 1892 

Robert Williams, from ... 1887 to Nov. 

Do from ... 1892 

William Thomson, accountant, from Feb. 1892 



1877 
1887 
1877 
1880 
1880 
1890 
1877 
1876 
1874 
1873 
1882 
1883 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1886 

1884 
1887 
1887 
1884 
1891 
1887 
1887 



1887 
1892 

1892 
1890 

1890 
1891 



1891 



59 



Census for tbe parisb of Cambusnetban, 1891. 



Separate Houses. 

„ . » j. ,, , .j. Families' In- Unin- 

PariMh of Camlusncthan. Sehedules . habited. habited. 

Cambusnethan Reg. Dis. , 4099 4064 75 

Calderhead do., 322 314 13 



Total 
Build- No. of 
mg. Persons. 
34 21143 
— 1567 



Totals in 1881, 



4378 
4031 



88 
539 



Increase in Ten Years, ... 310 347 dcr.451 

Burgh of Wishaw — Cambusnethan Parish, 



No. 1 Ward, 

No. 2 Ward, 

No. 3 Ward, 

Part of No. 4 Ward, 
Dalziel Parish — 

Part of No. 4 Ward, 



Totals in 1881, 



628 
765 
664 
300 

542 

2899 

2747 



624 
756 
653 
300 

503 

2S36 
2640 



15 

31 

4 

15 

70 
367 



34 
17 

17 



1 
21 



22710 

20824 

1886 

3094 
3918 
3310 
1762 

2785 



24 14,869 
12 13,112 



Increase in Ten Years, ... 152 196 dcr.297 

Burgh of Wishaw — Cambusnethan Reg. Dis. , 
Population in 1891, ... 2357 2333 55 

Population in 1881, ... 2301 2237 299 



12 



22 
12 



1757 

12,084 
10,782 

1302 



Increase in Ten Years, ... 56 96 dcr. 244 10 

Towns, Villages, and Hamlets in Cambusnethan Parish. 

Increase Decrease 
1891. 1881. inlOyrs. 

Wishaw (Town) 
Newmains and Muirhouses, 
Cambusnethan (Village), 
Overtown (Village), ... 
Waterloo, Burnhall, Gillhead, &c. , 
Moruingside, Chapel, and Torbush, 
Stane Tarbothie, and Burnbrae, 
Clydesdale Rows, 
Castlehill Feus, 

Bonkle, Crindledyke, and Bridgend, 
Damside, Springhead, Crosshill, &c., 
Daviesdykes.Summerside, &c. (Hamlets) 45 

Burgh of Wishaw — No. of Electors. 

No. 1 Ward, - - - 651 I No. 3 Ward, - - - 703 

No. 2 Ward, - - - 697 | No. 4 Ward, ... 739 

Total, - 2790 



1891. 


1881. 


in lOyrs. 


inlOyi 


10476 


8953 


1523 





2599 


2682 


— 


83 


2082 


1829 


153 





1389 


1335 


54 





1101 


1009 


92 





1153 


1156 





3 


1270 


1204 


66 





242 


288 


— 


46 


269 


258 


11 





240 


240 


— 





155 


132 


23 





ts) 45 


49 


— 


4 



&t6f of JJocieftea anb of^er &ocaf 
3nformafion + 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

President, Walter J. Houldsworth, Coltness ; Treasurer, John 
Nimmo ; Secretary, James Johnston, Pather. 

AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION (Wishaw District). 

Ambulance Waggon stationed in Court-yard behind Police Office, 
Main Street, Wishaw. Available at any time by Day or by 
Night. Keys kept in Police Office. Hon. Secretary, J. Logan, 
Town Clerk. 

BANKS. 

British Linen Co. Bank, Main Street — Robert Morton, Agent. 
Clydesdale Bank (Limited), Stewarton Street — Jas. S. Morrison 

and W. B. Thomson, Agents ; J. Mackay, Accountant. 
Commercial Bank of Scotland (Limited), Stewarton Street — 

John Burgess, Agent ; John Nimmo, Accountant. 
Royal Bank of Scotland — George Skead, Agent ; George 

Wallace, Accountant. 
Bank Holidays — New Year's Day ; Good Friday ; May 2nd ; 

August 1st ; December 25th ; and any other day which 

may be appointed by Royal Proclamation. 

BIBLE SOCIETY. 

National Bible Society of Scotland — Cambusnethan Auxiliary — 
President, James Houldsworth of Coltness ; Joint Treasurers, 
Rev. P. M'Nish, Neil Thorn. 

BICYCLE CLUB. 

President, J. Logan, Coltness ; Captain, J. Robertson ; 
Treasurer, J. Laurie ; Secretary, A. Frew. 

BLACKSMITHS' SOCIETY. 

Associated Blacksmiths' Society, No. 8 Branch, Wishaw — 

President, Robert M'Vey ; Secretary, William Rankin ; 
Treasurer, J. Stirling. 



61 

BOWLING CLUB. 

President, James Houldsworth of Coltness ; Secretary, Robert 
Thomson ; Treasurer, William Lindsay ; Green-keeper, Duncan 
M'Callum. 

BUILDING SOCIETY. 

Patron, James Houldsworth ; President, Thomas Allan ; 
Manager, William Thomson. 

BUILDING SOCIETY (Economic). 

Chairman, Provost Bell ; Solicitor, John Logan ; Surveyor, 
Malcolm Ross ; Secretary, John Nimmo. 

BURGH COMMISSIONERS AND OFFICIALS. 

Chief Magistrate, Thomas Bell ; Junior Magistrates, William 
Russell and Hugh Haran ; Commissioners, Charles Canning, 
Matthew Cleland, John Gibson, Alexander Murdoch, David 
M 'Queen, William Thomson, John Wallace, John Williams, 
Robert Williams ; Town Clerk, John Logan ; Treasurer, R >bt. 
Morton ; Collector, Win. Lindsay ; Procurator-Fiscal, John 
Burgess ; Superintendent, John Morrison ; Clerk and Assessor, 
John Logan ; Burgh Engineer, James Tait, C.E. ; Medical 
Officer, John Cowan, M.B. ; Sanitary Inspector, Jas. Prentice ; 
Inspector of Lodging-Houses and Dairies, James Prentice ; Gas 
Committee of Commissioners, Thomas Bell, Hugh Haran, John 
Gibson, Alex. Murdoch, John Wallace, Robert Williams ; 
Clerk, John Logan ; Treasurer, George Skead ; Manager, James 
M'Nair, Caledonian Road. 

BURNS' CLUBS. 

Wishaw — President, Secretary, and Treasurer, Jas. Anderson. 
Cambusnethan — President, John Gibson ; Treasurer, D. 
Johnston ; Secretary, Andrew Armour. 

CAMBUSNETHAN SCHOOL BOARD. 

Chairman, James Hamilton; Members, Rev. Alex. Harper, M.A., 
Very Rev. Canon M'Cay, Rev. P. M'Nish, Rev. Chas. Steele, 
M.A., David Frew, John Keir, Dr Millar, Win. Russell; Clerk, 
John Burgess ; Treasurer, James S. Morrison ; Officer, John 
Irwin, 171 Caledonian Road. 

CARPET BOWLING CLUB. 

President, Dr Cochrane ; Treasurer, James Gray ; Secretary, 
Wm. Brown ; Match Secretary, J. T. Binnie. 

CARRIERS. 

William King leaves 63 Glasgow Road. Wishaw, every Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday, at 7 a.m., and 61 Osborne Street, 
Glasgow, on same days, at 5.30 p.m. William M'Donald leaves 
Glen Road, Wishaw, daily at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., and 43 
Virginia Street, Glasgow, at 1.45 and 4.45 p.m. 



62 
CHURCHES. 

Cambusnethan Parish Church, Rev. J. L. Rentoid, M.A. ; Rev. 
A. L. Johnston, Assistant. 

Wishaw Parish (quoad sacra), Rev. A. Harper, M.A. ; Sunny- 
side, Mr James Graham' Missionary. 

Wishaw Roman Catholic Church, Rev. Joseph Van Hecke ; 
Organist, Mrs Sweeney. 

Craigneuk Roman Catholic Church, Father Ritchie, Curate. 

Coltness Parish (quoad sacra), Rev. Win, Robertson, M.A. ; 
Rev. D. J. M. Porteous, Assistant. 

Overtown Parish (quoad sacra), Rev. D. L. Thomson. 

Cambusnethan Free Church, Rev. Chas. Steele, M.A. 

Wishaw Free Church, Rev. D. Brunton. 

Craigneuk Free Church, Rev. VV. Hood. 

Craigneuk Church of Scotland, Rev. YV. H. Wright. 

United Presbyterian Church, Rev. R. S. Bruce. 
Do. do. do. (Bonkle), Rev. J. H. Scott. 

Baptist Church, Rev. George Whittet. 

Reformed Presbyterian Church, Rev. S. G. Kennedy, B.A. 

Evangelical Union Church, Rev. P. M'Nish. 

Wishaw and Shieldnuiir Primitive Methodist Church, Rev. 
W. Stott. 

St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Rev. S. W. Poole, M.D. 

Christian Brethren (Victoria Hall). 

Coltness Mission House (Wishaw), Mr A. M'Callum, Missionary. 

CHURCH GUILDS AND FELLOWSHIPS. 

Cambusnethan Parish Church Sabbath Morning Guild — Hon. 
President, Rev. J. L. Rentoul, M.A. ; Treasurer, Miss M'Lees ; 
Secretary, W. H. Livingston, 195 Stewarton Street. Cambus- 
nethan F.C. Guild — President, J. H. Morison ; Treasurer, R. 
Craig ; Secretary, F. Irving, Main Street. E. U. Guild — Hon. 
President, Rev. P. M'Nish ; President, Thos. M'Kendrick ; 
Treasurer, George M'Kendrick ; Secretary, Alex. Richardson, 
226 Caledonian Road. U.P. Young Men's Association — 
President, Rev. R. S. Bruce ; Secretary, Win. Allan, Belhaven 
Terrace ; Treasurer and Leader of Psalmody, John Gillies. 
Wishaw F.C. Guild — President, I). Mackay ; Joint-Secretaries, 
Hugh Love, jun., Caledonian Road, and Geo. Hunter, Stewarton 
Street ; Treasurer, John Moffat. Wishaw Parish Church Guild 
— President, J. King ; Treasurer, J. Johnson ; Secretary, J. 
Craig. 

CHORAL UNION. 

Hon. President, W. J. Houldsworth ; Conductor, Robert 
Wardrop ; Leader, Thomas Steele ; Treasurer and Secretary, 
Alex. Watt; Organist, Miss G. Buchanan. 



63 

CLOTHING SOCIETY. 

Secretary, Mrs Rentnul, Cam'nethan Manse ; Treasurer, Mrs 
Scott, Garrion. 

COMBINATION POORHOUSE. 

For Parishes of Cambnsnethan, Bothwell, Dalziel, and Shotts — 
Governor, James Reiil ; Matron, Miss Lennie ; Clerk, Thomas 

Allan. 

COUNTY COUNCILLORS (Wishaw District). 

Newmains Division — James Houldsworth of Coltness. Overtown 
Division — David Frew, Overtown. Wishaw East Division — 
Walter J. Houldsworth, Coltness. Wishaw West Division — 
Thomas Bell, Main Street, Wishaw. Parochial Representative 
— James Scott, Garrion Tower, Overtown. 

COUNTY CLERK. 

W. Alston Dykes, Hamilton. 

CURLING CLUB. 

Patron, Walter J. Houldsworth ; President, Robert Williams ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, George Marshall. 

ENGINEERS, Amalgamated Society of (Wishaw District). 

President, James Caldwell ; Secretary, Wm Port; Treasurer, 
Robert Forsyth. 

FAIR DAYS. 

Second Thursday of May, and Fourth Thursday of October. 

FEVER HOSPITAL. 

Local Authority Fever Hospital — Matron, Mrs Thos. Nixon. 

FOOTBALL CLUBS. 

Wishaw Thistle — President, James Govan ; Treasurer, Alex. 
Watt ; Hon. Secretary, James Lindsay ; Match Secretary, 
James Johnstone; Captain 1st XL, Wm. Watt; 2nd XL, 
Daniel Nelson ; Convener of Business Committee, Jas. Mitchell. 
Ground, Old Public Park (five minutes from Central Station). 
Wishaw West-End — Secretary, Thos. Dudgeon. Wishaw Star 
— Secretary, R. Penman. Cambnsnethan Thistle — Secretary, 
John Stevenson. Wishaw Hibernians — Secretary. J. Donnelly. 
Shieldmuir Excelsior — Secretary, J. M'Alloway. Wishaw 
Victoria — Secretary, Thomas Steele. 

FORESTERS. 

Court Royal Archers (5993), meets in Assembly Rooms ; Chief 
Ranger, Robert Currie ; Secretary, Robert Khmon ; Treasurer, 
Jas. Stoddart. Irish National Foresters (Thomas Sexton 
Branch), meets in Young Street; Chief Ranger, J. Ferrie ; 
Secretary, M. Moore ; Treasurer, J. Prunty. 



FREE GARDENERS' LODGE. 

Western Order of Free Gardeners — R. W.M., James Irvine; 
Secretary, J. Harvey ; Treasurer, David Nicol. Meets in 
Assembly Rooms. 

FRIENDLY SOCIETIES. 

Cambusnethan — President, William Hamilton, jun. ; Treasurer, 
William Hamilton, sen. ; Secretary, John Paton. Wishaw Iron 
Works Friendly Societies — Secretary, A. R. Sominerville; Treas- 
urer, T. W. Millen. Glenclelland Colliery Workers' Yearly 
Society — Secretary, Mr Jarvie. Etna Iron Works Yearly 
Society — President, John Brown, Craigneuk ; Doctor, David 
Jones, Motherwell. 

FUNERAL SOCIETY (Wishawtown). 

Commenced, 1829 ; Registered, 1835. Membership, 3067. 
Assets at 31st Dec, 1892, £1397 4s 6d ; Quarterly Contributions, 
6d each adult member. Secretary, Thomas Steele, Parochial 
Buildings, Wishaw ; Treasurer, William Strain, Main Street, 
Wishaw. 

GOOD TEMPLAR LODGES. 

Upper Ward District, No. 34— D.E.S., J. Morrison, Condie's 
Buildings, Wishaw ; D.V.T., James Dobbie, Bentfoot, Over- 
town. Wishaw Lodge, 127 — Sandilands' Hall, Main Street ; 
Lodge Deputy, John Morrison. Craigneuk Thistle, 4427, — 
Free Church Hall; L.D. , William C. Reid. Cambusnethan 
Lodge, 515 — Cambusnethan School-room; D.G.C.T., W. Mor- 
ton, Tinto View, Cambusnethan. " Bird of Freedom," 778 — 
Methodist Church, Shieldmuir ; L.D. , Edward Strefford. 
" White Lily," 918— Newarthill ; L.D., D. Watson. "Scot- 
land's First," (Juvenile) — Sandilands' Hall, Wishaw. 

HARRIERS CLUB. 

Hon. President, ex-Bailie Hamilton ; Secretary, W. Main ; 
Treasurer, W. Reid ; Captain, Jas. Gray. 

HIGHLAND SOCIETY. 

Hon. President, James Scott ; President, Malcolm Ross ; 
Secretary, R. Reid ; Treasurer, W. Walker. 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

President, James Houldsworth ; Treasurer, Andrew Armour ; 
Secretary, William Lindsay, jun. 



65 

INSURANCE OFFICES AND AGENTS. 

Caledonian Fire, Morrison & Thomson ; Caledonian Plate Glass, 
Morrison & Thomson ; Commercial Union, J. F. Inglis ; County, 
Jas. Logan ; Lancashire, T. W. Millen ; Lancashire & York- 
shire, Thomas Swinnerton ; Life Association, Thos. M'Murtrie ; 
Liverpool & London, VVm. Thomson ; London Plate Glass, 
Wm. Thomson ; North British & Mercantile, George Skead ; 
Northern, Thomas Swinnerton ; Northern Accident, John 
Nimmo ; Norwich & London Accident, Burgess & Smith ; 
Norwich Union Life, John Nimmo ; National Provincial Plate 
Glass, Thos. Swinnerton ; Provident Life, James Logan ; Queen, 
Wm. Thomson ; Royal, Thos. Allan, John Nimmo ; Royal 
Exchange Fire & Life, M. M'Kay ; Scottish Equitable, Burgess 
& Smith ; Scottish Imperial, John Logan ; Scottish Provident, 
James Scott ; Scottish Union & National, James Logan, John 
M'Intyre, Wm. Pomphrey, Jas. Tait ; Scottish Provincial, Wm. 
Pomphrey; London & Lancashire Fire, Wm. Pomphrey; Scottish 
Widows' Fund, John Logan ; Sickness & Accident, Morrison & 
Thomson ; Standard Life, Morrison & Thomson ; The Imperial 
Live Stock, Thomas Swinnerton ; The Carriage Insurance Co., 
Thos. Swinnerton ; The Scottish Boiler Insurance Co., Thomas 
Swinnerton ; The Scottish Employers' Liability and Accident 
Assurance Co. , Thomas Swinnerton; United Kingdom, A. B. 
M'Kendrick ; West of England, Thos. Allan ; Prudential- 
Superintendent, J. Wardle, Motherwell ; Assistant Superin- 
tendent, R. Blackett, Wishaw ; Agents, T. Graham, D. 
M'Cormick, C. Canning, W. Anderson, and S. Lyons. 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE FOR LANARKSHIRE 
(Wishaw District). 

Bell, Thomas, Chief Magistrate of Wishaw ; Houldsworth, 
James, of Coltness ; Houldsworth, Walter J. , Coltness ; 
Livingstone, James, M.D., Wishaw ; Lockhart, Major-General 
G ramie Alexander, C.B., Cam'nethan House ; Logan, James, 
Factor, Coltness ; Mason, Robert, of Brow ; Millar, Dr John, 
Newmains ; M'Queen, David, Factor, Wishaw Cottage ; 
Stewart, R. King, of Murdostoun Castle ; Williams, John, The 
Green. 

LAWN TENNIS CLUB. 

President, David M'Queen ; Treasurer, Geo. Skead ; Secretary, 
J. B. Tait. 

LIBERAL ASSOCIATION. 

President, David Frew ; Secretary, J. S. Morrison ; Treasurer, 
James Anderson. 

LICENSED VICTUALLERS' ASSOCIATION. 

President, Robert Pettigrew ; Secretary and Treasurer, Charles 
Nelson. 



66 

MASONIC LODGES. 

St. Mary's, Coltness, No. 31— E.W.M., Alex. Russell ; Treas- 
urer, Dr Cochrane ; Secretary, W. Walker. St. Clair's, Cam- 
busnethan, No. 427 — R. W.M., David Johnston; Treasurer, 
Thomas Bryson ; Secretary, JjVm. Burt. 

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT. 

For Mid-Division of the County of Lanark, J. Wynford 
Philipps, 24 Queen Anne's Gate, London, S.W. 

MERCHANTS' ASSOCIATION. 

President, Jacob Stirling ; Secretary and Treasurer, John 
Nimmo. 

MUSICAL AND DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION. 

Hon. President, Ex-Bailie Williams ; Secretary, Hugh Fraser ; 
Treasurer, John M. Graham. 

MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATIONS. 

Cambusnethan Parish Church Mutual Improvement Association 
— President, Rev. J. L. Rentoul, M.A. ; Treasurer, James 
Morton, Belhaven Terrace ; Secretaries, Rev. A. L. Johnston 
and S. Smith. Wishaw Parish Church Literary Society — Hon. 
President, Rev. Alex. Harper, M.A. ; President, T. W. Millen ; 
Treasurer, James Millar, Main Street ; Secretary, Alex. T. 
Pomphrey, Maylea. 

NEWMAINS. 

Newmains Water Committee (County Council) — Convener, Jas, 
Houldsworth ; Hon. Clerk, R. Russell. Coltness Ironworks 
Accident Fund Society — President, John Wardlaw ; Secretary, 
William Oliver ; Treasurer, John Ellis. Newmains Thistle 
F.C. — Secretary and Treasurer, Thomas M'Gregor. Newmains 
Shamrock F.C. — President, James Newcombe ; Secretary and 
Treasurer, John Brown. Mutual Improvement Association — 
President, J. F. Inglis ; Secretary, Win. M'Connachie ; Treas- 
urer, A. Calder. Newmains and Cambusnethan Co-operative 
Society — President, George Brown ; Treasurer, Robert Dobbie ; 
Secretary, James Cameron. Newmains Bowling, Tennis, and 
Curling Club — Hon. President, James Houldsworth of Coltness ; 
Hon. Treasurer — James Scott ; Hon. Secretary, Thomas Smith. 
Tennis Club Council — Captain, Dr Smith ; Vice-Captain, Dr 
Hudson ; Secretary, D. A. Grierson. Coltness Iron Works 
Band — Thomas Chalmers, Bandmaster. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

Wishaio Press and Advertiser — William Pomphrey, publisher. 
Wishaw Herald and Clydesdale Advertiser — Reid & Aberdein, 
publishers. 



67 

OMNIBUSES. 

Wisi-iaw and Newmains. — 'Bus leaves Wishaw (Crown Hotel 
Stables) at 10. a.m., 2p.m., 4.30 p.m., 6.15 p.m., 8 p.m. 
(Saturdays only); Leaves Newmains at 10.30a.m., 2.30 
p.m., 5 p.m., 6.45 p.m., S 30 p.m. (Saturdays only). 'Bus 
Leaves Wishaw (Royal Hotel) at 11.30 a.m., 3 p.m., 5.45 
p.m., 7.45 p.m., 10 p.m. (Saturdays only) ; Leaves New- 
mains at 12.15 p.m., 3.50 p.m., 6.15 p.m., 8.30 p.m., 10.25 
p.m. (Saturdays only). 

Wishaw and Motherwell. — 'Bus Leaves Wishaw at 10.20 
a.m., 1.5 p.m., 3.20p.m., 6.30p.m., 8.15p.m. (Saturdays 
only); Leaves Motherwell at 9.25 a.m., 12.20p.m., 2.25 
p.m., 5.30 p.m., 7.15 p.m. (Saturdays only). 

ORNITHOLOGICAL SOCIETY (Wishaw). 

President, John Hamilton ; Secretary, R. Clark ; Treasurer, 
Wm. Lindsay. 

OVERTOWN. 

Excelsior Good Templar Lodge, No. 206 — Lodge Deputy, John 
Connel, Shawfield, Law ; Secretary, Arch. Robertson. Reading 
Room — Secretary, Wm. Keir ; Treasurer, Robert Winning. 
Overtown Sabbath School — Superintendent, Thomas Prentice. 
E.C. Superintendent — John Gibson. Overtown Brass Band — 
Leader, David Gibb, jun. String Band — Leader, John Moore. 

PAROCHIAL BOARD. 

Chairman, James Houldsworth of Coltness ; Inspector, Thomas 
Allan; Collector, Wm. Thomson ; Medical Officers, Drs Cowan, 
Caldwell, Livingstone, and Millar. Ratepayers' Representatives 
— Edward O'Neil, Daniel Rafferty, David Frew, James Tait, 
James Johnston, Alexander M 'Galium, George M'Kendrick, 
Thomas Graham, William Lindsay, William Russell, James 
Graham, James Armour, Robert Wood row. 

PENNY SAVINGS BANK. 

Wishaw — Secretary and Treasurer, Rev. P. M'Nish. Cambus- 
nethan— Cashier, David Gray ; Auditors, James Steel, James 
Forsyth, Thomas Steele. Craigneuk — Cashier, Thomas Muirie ; 
Accountant, A. Ferguson ; Auditor, Robert Jack, Bank of 
Scotland, Motherwell. 

POLICE COURT. 

Meets every Monday at 10 o'clock, or as occasion requires. 
Burgh Prosecutor, John Burgess ; Assessor, John Logan ; 
Superintendent of Police, John Morrison, Kirk Road. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Librarian, Andrew Wingate ; Treasurer, George Skead ; Secre- 
tary, James S. Morrison. 



QUOITING CLUB. 

President, Edward Cuthberteon ; Treasurer, Walter Smith ; 
Secretary, Adam Allan, South Station. 

REGISTRAR. 

Registrar of Births, Marriages, and Deaths for the Parish of 
Cambusnethan, Thomas Allan, Campbell Street ; Assistant 
Registrar, Thomas Steele. Office Hours — 10 till 12, and 5 till 
7 ; Saturdays, 10 till 12. 

ROADS COMMITTEE of County Council (Wishaw District). 
James Houldsworth (Convener), W. J. Houldsworth, David 
Frew, James Scott. Committee for Burgh — Provost Bell, W. 
J. Houldsworth. Clerk, James F. Mackenzie, Hamilton ; 
Surveyor, John Clark, Hamilton. 

SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. 

Public School, Wishaw, Joseph Ingram ; Academy, Wishaw, 
J. D. Shaw; Berryhill, Wishaw, Robert Dey, M.A. ; Cambus- 
nethan School, William Grierson ; Morningside School, A. 
Gibson ; Waterloo School, A. Lowrie ; Overtown School, Alex. 
Ritchie ; Main Street School, Miss Lindsay ; Lady Belhaven's 
School, Miss Lindsay ; Roman Catholic School, Wishaw, James 
Keane ; Coltness Iron Co.'s School, Newmains, John K. Cross; 
Roman Catholic School, Newmains, Miss M'Donald ; Roman 
Catholic School, Overtown, Miss M'Fadyen; Public School 
(Dalziel), Craigneuk, George Brough, M.A. ; Craigneuk, Roman 
Catholic School (Dalziel), Miss Slaurach ; Allanton Combination 
(Cambusnethan and Calclerhead), Peter Lornie. 

SCIENCE SCHOOL. 

President, Matthew Laurie ; Secretary, Jas. S. Morrison ; 
Teachers, R. Dey, J. N. Hood, Malcolm Ross, R. Sneddon. 

SHERIFF SMALL DEBT COURT. 

Held in County Buildings every Third Thursday at 12 o'clock. 
Sheriff-Substitute, Wm. Ludovic Mair, Advocate, Airdrie ; 
Issuing Clerk, Thomas Steele, Campbell Street. 

SHEPHERDS. 

James Houldsworth Lodge of Ancient Shepherds meets in 

Brown's Hall, Main Street. W.M., George Tyrell, Shieldmuir ; 

Treasurer, John Neal ; Secretary, Alex. M'Kenzie, 15 Quarry 

Street, Wishaw. Mount Etna Lodge, Craigneuk— W.M., Robt. 

Bulloch ; Treasurer, Alex. Morton ; Secretary, A. Scott, 

Clydesdale Buildings, Craigneuk. 
ST. ANDREW'S SOCIETY. 

President, J. D. Shaw ; Secretary, John Logan ; Treasurer, J. 

S. Morrison. 
TOWN HALL COMPANY (Limited). 

Chairman, Thomas Bell; Secretary, William Russell; Treasurer, 

John Ferguson ; Hall-keeper, Angus Clark. 



69 

UNIONIST ASSOCIATION. 

President, Dr James Livingstone ; Secretary, John Logan ; 
Treasurer, Thomas Swinnerton. 

VOLUNTEER COMPANIES. 

F Company (Wishaw) — Captain, Alexander Ferguson, Both well; 
Drill Instructor, Sergeant Courtney ; Armoury, Stewarton 
Street. G Company (Newmains) — Captain, James Logan, 
Coltness ; Drill Instructor, Sergeant Shinton. 
WISHAW BRASS BAND. 
Bandmaster, George Watson. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Meets in Caledonian Hall (Old U. P. Church) — President, Alex. 
Richardson ; Treasurer, James M'Culloch ; Secretary, H. 
Lightbody, 159 Caledonian Road. 
YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Hon. President, Mrs Houhlsworth, Coltness ; President, Miss 
Graham ; Treasurer, Miss Mackee ; Secretary, Miss Richardson, 
Caledonian Road. 



PARISH OF SHOTTS. 



CLELAND AND OMOA.— Cleland Carpet Bowling Club— 
President, Richard Gibb, Auchinlea ; Treasurer, Thos. Thomson, 
Auchinlea Store ; Secretary, J. Lamonby. Cleland Football 
Club — President, Wm. Russell ; Treasurer, Charles Kelly ; 
Secretary, Angus Macdonald ; Captain, Thomas Hunter. 
Floral and Horticultural Society — President, Wm. Russell, Jan.; 
Treasurer, Wm. Spence ; Secretary, Alex. Lochhead. Cleland 
Workmen's Friendly Society — President, Wm. Hill ; Treasurer, 
James M'Alpine ; Secretary, John M'Alpine. Cleland Brass 
Baud — Leader, John Sommerville ; Instructor, Mr Marsden. 
Co-operative Society — President, Wm. Angus ; Treasurer, 
Robert Bell ; Secretary and Manager, James Smith. Parish 
Library (open every alternate Monday) — Patron, R. K. Stewart 
of Murdostoun ; President, Wm. Spence ; Librarian, Alex. 
Lochhead ; Secretary, Rev. D. Cameron. Penny Savings Bank 
(open every Saturday from 7 p.m. till 8 p.m., in Committee 
Room of Co-operative Society) — Book-keeper, Robert Smellie. 
Registrar for the Western District of the Parish — William 
Spence ; Office Hours, 5 to 7 p.m. 

STANE AND DYKEHEAD, &c— Parish Fast Days— Thursday 
before Third Sabbath of June, and Thursday before First 
Sabbath of November. Fairs — Tuesdays happening from 27th 
June to 2nd July, and from 6th to 11th December, inclusive. 
Shotts Agricultural Society — Acting Vice-President, Colonel 



70 

Forrest ; Secretary, Thomas Loudon, Muirhouse ; Treasurer, 
Peter Forrest, Commercial Bank. Shotts Workmen's Friendly 
Society — President, James Gilchrist, Shotts Iron Works ; 
Secretary, Robert Campbell ; Treasurer, James Stevenson. 
Shotts Iron Works Funeral Society — President, John Brown, 
Burnbrae; Secretary, William G. Lyons, Gray Street; Treasurer, 
John Erskine, Stane. Shotts Coffin Society — President, 
David Simpson, Shotts Iron Works ; Secretary, and Treasurer, 
David Simpson, Stane. Dykehead (Shotts) Football Club — - 
President, Dr John Blair ; Secretary, Geo. Simpson, Dyke- 
head ; Treasurer, Jas. Sneddon, Dykehead. Shotts Shamrock 
F.C. — Secretary, F. Doyle. I.O.G.T. — John f.oudon Lodge, No. 
268— W.C.T., John Torrance, Stane, Shotts. Shotts Free 
Gardeners' Lodge — W.G.M., Wm. Sneddon, Dykehead ; Secre- 
tary, Walter Brown, Dykehead ; Treasurer, James Neilson, 
Dykehead. Dykehead (Shotts) Burns' Club — President, And. 
Brunton, Dykehead ; Secretary, James Sneddon, Dykehead ; 
Treasurer, James Simpson, Dykehead. Stane Burns' Club — 
President and Treasurer, William Teimant, Stane ; Secretary, 
Robt. Gray, Torbothie. Shotts Instrumental Band — Bandmaster, 
James Gilchrist, Shotts Iron Works. Dykehead Brass Band — 
Leader, John Watson, Dykehead. St. Patrick's Brass Band 
(Shotts) — Bandmaster, James Gilchrist. Shotts Bowling Club — 
Hon. President, A. W. Turnbull ; President, Geo. Sharpy 
Treasurer, John Hutton, Commercial Bank, Shotts ; Secretary, 
Alex. M'Niven, Shotts Store. Shotts Carpet Bowling Club — 
President, Alex. Barr ; Secretary, R. Gray. Calderhead School 
Board — Colonel Forrest (chairman), Rev. W. R. Rutherford, 
Rev. Peter Muller, Dr Caldwell, Wm. Steele, George Lindsay, 
George Gillespie ; Clerk and Treasurer, Douglas Wellwood ; 
Officer, James Deans. Shotts School Board — R. K. Stewart of 
Murdostoun (chairman). Rev. Alex. Watt, Rev. Michael Fuller, 
Rev. James Forrest, James Manuel, John M'Donald, James 
Ferguson ; Clerk, John Hutton, Bank, Shotts. Shotts Iron 
Works Library — President, Dr Caldwell ; Secretary, and 
Treasurer, Thomas Sharp. Dykehead and Shotts Co-operative 
Society (Dykehead) — President, Robert Carswell ; Secretary, 
William Wilson ; Treasurer, Robert Smellie. Member of 
Parliament (North-East Lanarkshire) — Donald Crawford, 
Oxford and Cambridge Club, London. Young Men's Christian 
Association (Stane) — President, James Thomson, Stane ; 
Secretary, Alexander Smith ; Treasurer, William Gilchrist, 
Gray Street. Shotts Lawn Tennis Club — President, Dr Blair ; 
Secretary, and Treasurer, James Hogg, Rosebank Cottage. 
Shotts Public Hall — President, Andrew Darling ; Secretary, and 
Treasurer, Robt. Campbell, Gray Street. Shotts Parochial Board 
— Colonel Forrest, chairman; James King, Inspector of Poor, 
and Collector of Rates. Stane and Dykehead Lodge of 
Ancient Shepherds, No. 2223, W.M., Robert Campbell; 
Secretary, James Stevenson. 



directors % i e t. 



um city maAflEHousE, 

174 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



Cheapest and Best Place for READY-MADE CLOTHING 
of Every Description. 

^©(NEWEST STYLES I N K^ 

HATS. CAPS, and SCARFS. 

^LARGE VARIETY O F K>o 

Shirts, Braces, Gloves, Dress Goods, Jackets, Ulsters, 
Linens, Cottons, Flannels, Blankets, &c, 

Men's Tweeds made up (Fit Guaranteed) at 
Lowest Prices. 

Scottish Wtbows' jf unb 

LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY. 



ACCUMULATED FUNDS, - ;£n,6oo,ooo. 

ANNUAL REVENUE, ^1,350,000. 

CASH PROFIT at Last Investigation, - - £1,727,659. 

This was the Largest Distribution of Profits made by any 
"British Life Office daring the period. 

It yielded Bonuses varying from £1 14s od to £4 6s 7d per 
cent, per Annum. 

The Whole Profits are divided amongst the Policy-holders. 

Glasgow Office, - 114 WEST GEJRGE STREET. 

AGENTS— 



Wishaw, - J. Logan, Solicitor. 
Carluke, - J. Marshall, Auctioneer. 
,, - A. Ballantynb, Low Mill. 



Coatbridge, Win. J. Andrew, National 
Bank. 
,, Wm. Cricuton, Union Bank. 
Hamilton, VV. Dundas Brown, Solicitor. 



DIRECTORY LIST. 



This List is intended to include Wishaw, Cambusnethan, Newmains, 
Morning side, Chapel, Overlown, Waterloo, Graigneuk, <£c. 

Na?nes of bankers, clergymen, teachers, dec. , will be found in the local 
information section. For other addresses which do not appear 
under classified trades or professions, see under heading 
" Miscellaneous." 



ACCOUNTANT. 

Thomson, William, Young Street 

ARCHITECTS. 

Cullen, Alexander, M.S. A., Wishaw and Hamilton 
Hinshalwood, Alexander, Coltness Cottages, Coltness 
Ross, Malcolm, Belhaven Terrace 

AUCTIONEERS. 

Marshall, J. & J. (of Carluke), Auction Mart, Caledonian Road 

BAKERS. 

Aikmau & Son, Overtown 

Brown, Peter, Main Street 

Campbell, James, Stewarton Street 

Denholm, Thomas (Pastry), Stewarton Street 

Ferguson, John, Main Street 

Forbes, James, Hill Street 

Forbes, James, Graigneuk 

Gourlay, Mrs Robert, Stewarton Street 

Harvie, George, Main Street 

Jackson, William, Main Street 

Kelly and Marshall, Cambusnethan 

Kirkland, J. & A. Newmains 

Muir, James, Newmains 

Phillips, James, Caledonian Road 

Phillips, Thomas, Newmains 

Robb, James, Newmains 

Sandilands, William (Pastry), Main Street 

Simpson, William, Main Street 

Stark, Charles, Main Street 

Watt, J. & W., Cambusnethan 

Wingate, Andrew, Caledonian Road. 



74 
BANK AGENTS.— See Banks. 

BARBERS AND HAIRDRESSERS. 

Bell, R., Kirk Road and Cambusnethan 
Fallow, J. B. , Main Street 
Fisher, John, Caledonian Road 
King, William, Stewarton Street 
Lawrie, William, Stewarton Street 
M'Callum, George, Main Street 
Sharp, William, Belhaven Road 

BERLIN WOOL AND FANCY REPOSITORY. 

Watt, I. A. & J. , Main Street 

BILLPOSTER. 

Morrison, Alexander, Main Street. 

BLACKSMITHS. 

Baxter, William, Allanbank, Newmains 
Gray, Charles, Kirk Road 
Jenkins, James, Howie's Smithy, Main Street 
Michie. Alexander, Glasgow Road 
Pollock, James, Graham Street 
Sommerville, R., Park Street 
Syme, Henry & Sons, Hill Street 
Thomson, A. , Russell Street 

BOILERMAKER. 

Moore, William, Shieldmuir 

BOOKSELLERS.— See Stationers. 
BOOTMAKERS. -See Shoemakers. 

BOTTLERS. 

Cochrane, J. & T. , Glen Road 

Collins, Andrew, Craigneuk 

Fyfe, James, Berryhill 

M'Faidane, Daniel, Alicelee, Berryhill 

Millar, Thomas D. , Graham Street 

Williamson, William, Caledonian Road 

BUILDERS. 

Binnie, John, Kirk Road 
Fraser, Andrew, Main Street 
Hodge, William, Kirk Road 
Inglis, John, Crindledyke, Newmains 
Rankin & Sons. East Thornlie Street 



75 

BRICK-BUILDERS. 

Cleghorn, William, Crindledyke, Newmains 
Jack, James, Cambusnethan 
Jardine & Prentice, Hill Street 
Murdoch, Alexander, Main Street 
Murdoch, David, Park Street 
Sorbie, J. & W., Park Street 

BRICK & TILE & FIRE-CLAY MANUFACTURERS. 

Hudspith, William & Co., Glasgow Road 
Loudon & Russell, Allantou, Morningside 

BROKERS. 

Coogan, J., Craigneuk 
Dunlop & Son, Cambusnethan 
Donnelly, Michael, & Son, Russell Street 
Hervey, William, Scott's Rows, Craigneuk 
Jordan, R. , Shieldmuir 

Kenney, James, Kirk Road and Main Street 
M'Gachie, T., Stewarton Street 
M'Kenna, Peter, Kirk Road 

BUTCHERS. 

Brown, John, Main Street 

Campbell, Daniel, Waterloo 

Chapman, James, Main Street and Craigneuk 

Cleland, James, Cambusnethan 

Cullen, R , Stewarton Street 

Eastmans Limited, 25 Kirk Road 

Frew, David, Overtown 

Henderson, James, Newmains 

Hunter, George, Caledonian Road 

Kirkland, J. &. A., Newmains 

Loudon, Thomas, Main Street 

Miller, William, Caledonian Road and West End Cross 

M'Kenzie, Daniel, Caledonian Road 

Newlands, James, Shieldmuir 

Nimmo, Henry, Kirk Road 

Pettigrew, James, Main Street 

Rankin, Zechariah, Main Street 

Smith, Robert, Main Street and Newmains 

Waddell, Robert, Cambusnethan 

CABINET-MAKERS.— See Joiners. 

CARRIAGE-HIRERS. 

Gentleman, William, Kirk Road 
Hamilton, J. & T., Royal Hotel 
Hunter, John, Crown Hotel Stables 
M'Arthur, Mrs, Railway Hotel (South Station). 



76 

CARTERS. 

Cunningham, James, Craignenk 
Deans, Joseph, Overtown 
Gilchrist, John, Cambusnethan 
Graham, David, Hill Street 
Hall, Thomas, Overtown 
Ingram, Robert, Main Street 
Marshall, William, Main Street 
Milne, David, Anderson Street 
Orr, Andrew, Hill Street 
Paterson, John, Overtown 
Pollock, William, Craigneuk 
Riddell, James, Stewarton Street 
Sommerville, Robert, Hill Street 
Thomson, John, Main Street 

CHEMISTS.— See Druggists. 

CHIMNEY-SWEEPERS. 

Brown, William, Main Street 
Mitchell, John, Graham Street 

CHINA AND DELF MERCHANTS. 

Docherty, J., Royal George, Kirk Road 
Mackee, Mrs, Main Street 
M'Kenna, P., Kirk Road 
Nimmo, Miss, Main Street 

COACHBUILDERS. 

M'Innes, Peter, & Co., Marshall Street 
Slater, John, Kirk Road 

COALMASTERS. 

Barr, Thomas, Cam'nethan Colliery 
Belhaven Colliery Co. (Wishaw Estate) 
Coltness Iron Co. (Limited), Newmains 
Glasgow Iron & Steel Co., Wishaw 
Gray, Thomas, Chapel, Newmains 
Hudspith, William, & Co., Green 
Kerr & Mitchell, Glenclelland 
Morningside Coal Co., Morningside, Newmains 
Williams, John, & Co. , Camp, Motherwell 
Whitelaw, Gavin, Clydesdale and Muirhouse. 

CONFECTIONERS.— See Fruiterers. 

COOPER. 

Forsyth, Mrs William, Main Street 



77 

DAIRY-KEEPERS, &c. (See also Farmers. ) 
Barrie, Robert, Anderson Street 
Cavanagh, Francis, Berryhill Rows 
Cullen, Richard, Shand Street 
Deans, Mrs, Overtown 
Ferguson, James, Thomlie 
Fleming, Robert, Waterloo 
Fleming, William, Waterloo 
Gray, Mrs, Quarry Cottage, Cambusnethan 
Gardner, Misses, Craigneuk 
Hamilton, Agnes, Caledonian Road 
Hart, Robert, Morningside 
Hotchkiss, George, Shieldmuir 
Inglis, Agnes, Main Street 
Liddell, Thomas, Caledonian Road 
Lindsay, Mary, Cambusnethan 
M'Intosh, Mrs, Caledonian Road 
Morton, Robert, Low Main Street 
Muiihead, A. , Park Street 
Nicol, Joseph, Stewarton Street 
Nimmo, Mrs, Main Street 
Orr, Thomas, Caledonian Road 
Park, John, Caledonian Road 
Rodgerson, Thomas, Newmains 
Shirlaw, George, Shand Street 
Stalker, Peter, Craigneuk 
Townsley, George W., Hill Street 
Walker, J., Stewarton Street 
Wardlaw, Mrs, Overtown 
Watson, Andrew, Caledonian Road 
Wingate, Andrew, Caledonian Road 

DEALERS (General). 

Clyde, R., West-End Cross 
King, Mrs A. , Kirk Road 

DRAPERS. (See also Tailors and Clothiers. ) 
Anderson, James, Main Street 
Andrew, Robert C, Newmains 
Baird, Thomas, Kirk Road 
Bryson, James, 193 Cambusnethan 
City Warehouse, Main Street 
Co-operative Store, Main Street 
Currie, J. & A., Cambusnethan 
Ellis, Richard, West Thornlie Street 
Fraser, R. B., Main Street 
Gibson, Alexander, Main Street 
Gibson, Robert & Co., Kirk Road and Main Street 
Hailstones, James, 194 Cambusnethan 
Hawthorn, George, Craigneuk 



78 

Inglis, John F. , Newmains 

Johnston, W. & A., & Co., Main Street 

Kirkland, J. & A., Newmains and Overtown 

Littlejohn, James, & Co., Main Street 

Littlejohn, John, Main Street 

Lochhead, Alexander, Main Street 

Lowe, Abraham, Craigneuk 

Marshall & Young, Main Street 

Milne, James M., Main Street 

Millar, James, Main Street 

Miller, Andrew, Waterloo 

Mitchell, John, Main Street 

Moffat, Andrew, Hill Street 

Paterson, Thomas, Newmains 

Ross, W. G., Glasgow Road 

Russell, Mrs Archd. , Cambusnethan 

Shaw, John, Overtown 

Smith, Mrs Thomas, 127 Cambusnethan 

Somerville, William, Kirk Road 

Swan, William, Overtown 

Wallace, John, Kirk Road 

DRESSMAKERS.— See Milliners. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Allanson, William, Caledonian Road 
Cochrane, James, Main Street and Cambusnethan 
Glendye, James, Main Street 
Macfarlane, Thomas B., Main Street 

ENGINEERS. 

Bell, John, Trustees of the late, Wishaw 

Gray, Thomas, Chapel, Newmains 

Morton & Sons, Belhaven Terrace 

Paton, William, Shieldmuir 

Shearer, Andrew, Thorncliffe Villa, East Thornlie Street 

EGG-MERCHANTS. 

Keir Brothers (stores, back of Crown Hotel). 
Park, James, Russell Street 
Walker, John, Cambusnethan 

FACTORY (Fancy-Sewed Work). 

D. MacArthur & Co., Templars' Hall, King Street 

FACTORS. 

Logan, James (for the Coltness Estate), Branchal Lodge 
M'Queen, David (for the Belhaven Estate), Wishaw Cottage 



79 

FARMERS. 

Aitken, Mrs Grace, Watsonmids 

Allison, James, Spoutscross, Newmains 

Arnott, Hugh, Lower Daviesdykes 

Baillie, David, Morningside 

Baillie, Ludovic, North and South Dyke 

Barr, William, Carbarns 

Black, John, Hyndshaw 

Brown, William, Flemingtou 

Brownlie, James, Headlesscross 

Brownlie, Robert, Bogside 

Dick, Thomas, Waterloo 

Dobie, John, Garrionhaugh 

Ferguson, John, Thornlie 

Ford, John, Netherjohnstone 

Frame, J., Brow, Newmains 

Frame, John, Rowantree, Newmains 

Gray, Thomas, Watsonfoot 

Hamilton, John, East Crindledykc 

Hamilton, William, of Cairns, Ovcrtovvn 

Horn, John, Redmyre Mill 

Hunter, Andrew, Muirhouse 

Johnston, James, Pather 

King, Henry, East Netherton and Green 

King, Hugh, West Netherton 

Lambie, Robert, Cairneyhead 

Lawrie, Mrs Agnes, Hartfield 

Martin, William, Kingshill 

M'Connell, John (overseer), Coltncss Mains 

Naismith, Neil, Greenhead 

Nicol, Robert, Cathburn 

Nicol, Andrew, Sharnothshields 

Nimmo, J., Foulsykes 

Paterson, Robert, Wemysshill 

Pender, William, Dura 

Pettigrew, William, West Damside 

Prentice, James, Belston Farm, Corluke 

Rodger, Robert, Overjohnstone 

Robb, William, Auchterhead, Newmains 

Russell, John, East Tarbrax 

Steel, John, Summerside 

Steel, John, jun., Summerside 

Stewart, Alex., Kirkhall, Newmains 

Story, W., East Badallan, Shotts 

Torrance, Archibald, Watsonhead, Carluke 

Walker, Mrs Alexander, Murray's Acre 

Warnock, James, Garrion 

Warnock, John, Garrion 

Watson, William, Cambusnethan 

Wilson, John, West Crindledykc 



80 

Wilson, William, East Reclmyre 

Wilson, Andrew, West Redmyie 

Wingate, Andrew, sen., Castlehill 

Wyllie, William, Davisdykes 

Young, William, Herdshill and Lanniemuirs 

FISHMONGERS. 

Naismith, Ebenezer, Main Street 
Penman, Agnes. Caledonian Road 
Walker, John, Branchal Road 
FLESHERS.— See Butchers. 

FLORISTS. 

Gibb, William, Anderson Street 
Gilchrist, Robert, Main Street 
Keir Brothers, Main Street 
FRUITERERS AND CONFECTIONERS. 
Allan, Agnes, Main Street 
Gilchrist, Robert, Main Street 
Gourlay, Mrs Robert, Stewarton Street 
Hamilton, Thomas, Cambusnethan 
Hoey, James, Craigneuk 
Inglis, Robert, Cambusnethan 
Hutton, James, Craigneuk 
Jackson, William, Main Street 
Keir Brothers, Main Street 
King, Alex. , King Street, Main Street, &c. 
M'Callum, Duncan, Main Street 
M'Gill, Thomas, Main Street 
Ross, Alexander, Hill Street 
Sandilands, William, Main Street 
Turner, Margaret, Main Street 

FUNERAL UNDERTAKERS. 

Main & Co., Kirk Road 
MTnnes & Co., Marshall Street 
Steel, James, Cambusnethan 
Thomson, John, Stewarton Street 
Watson, J., 108 Cambusnethan 

GARDENERS. 

Alexander, James, 51 Shand Street (jobbing). 

Graham, James, Garden Lodge, Coltness 

M'Gough, John, Main Street 

M'Lauchlan, T. , Wishaw Gardens 

M'Lean, Alex., Kirk Road (jobbing). 

Wilson, R. W., Murdostoun Castle, Newmains 

GRAIN MERCHANTS. 

Brownlie, John, Garrion Mills, Overtown 
Bryson, William, 203 Cambusnethan 
Keith, Donald, Campbell Street 
Ogilvie, Charles, Hill Street 



81 

GROCERS— (Marker! thus * are also Spirit Dealers). 

Alexander, James, Cambusnethan 

Armour, James, Overtown 

Baird, Charles, Stewarton Street 

Borland, John, Craigneuk 

Brown, Angus, Berryhill 

Brown, John, Morningside 

Brownlie, David, Newmains 

Brownlie, John, Cambusnethan 
*Buchanan, William, West-end Cross 

Buchanan, William, Morningside 
*Burnside, Alexander, Craigneuk 

Campbell, William, Newmains 
"Campbell, W. J., Main Street 
*Clark, William Shearer, Glasgow Road and Chapel 

Cieland, Alexander, Waterloo 

Cochrane, George, Main Street 

Consumers' Tea Coy. , West-end Cross 

Co-operative Store, Main Street 

Crawford, Allan, Berryhill 

Duguid, William, Craigneuk 

Ferries, Mrs David; Stewarton Street 

Forrest, E. L. , Cambusnethan 
*Frew, David, Overtown 

Gibson, John, Newmains 

Gilchrist, John, Stewarton Street 
*Govan & Co., Main Street 

Greig, William, Main Street 

Hamilton, John & Thomas, Main Street and West-end Cross 

Hendry, Mrs, Young Street 
*Henry, Robert, Craigneuk 

Irving, William, Main Street 

Kelly, Lauchlan, Craigneuk 

King, Charles, Craigneuk 
*Kirkland, J. & A., Newmains, Waterloo, and Overlown 

Laird, William, Newmains 
*Laurie, Matthew, Caledonian Road 

Lightbody, John, Waterloo 

Littlejohn, Thomas, Main Street 
*Longmuir, James, Glasgow Road 

Lyle, Mrs, Stewarton Street 

Macbeth, George, Stewarton Street 

Macgregor, Duncan, Shieldmuir 

Martin, M. A., Main Street 

Maxwell, David, Cambusnethan 

M'Crae, Miss, Kirk Road 
*M 'Donald, Mrs, Craigneuk 

Miller, Andrew, Waterloo 

Montgomerie, Mrs James, Morningside 

Mooney, John, Newmains 



82 

Muir, Anthony, Cambusnethan 

Mnir, Thomas, & Co., Main Street 
*Munro, Finlay, Caledonian Road 
*Newlands, John, Craigneuk Store 

Newmains and Cambusnethan Co-operative Society, Limited, 
Newmains. 

Overtown Co-operative Society, Overtown 
*Pettigrew, Robert, Kirk Road 

Pettigrew, John, Waterloo 

Ferryman, Edward, Newmains 

Pollock, D. F. , Main Street 

Prentice, James, Overtown 

Prentice, Thomas, Overtown 

Robertson, J. & J., Main Street 
*Rodger, Hugh, Heatherygate 

Russell, Mrs H. , Cambusnethan 

Russell, Hugh, Newmains 

Russell, William, Cambusnethan 

Russell, John, Waterloo 

Scott, Francis, 6 Main Street 
*Skead, J. B. , Main Street 

Sleith, James, Newmains 

Smith, Alexander, Newmains 
*Steel, James, Main Street 

Stewart. James, Newmains 

Stevenson, John, Marshall Street 
"Stirling, Jacob, &Co., Stewarton St., Main St., and Newmains 
*Strain, William, Main Street 
*Taylor, James, Caledonian Road 
■"Thomson, Mrs, Beltonfoot Street 

Walker, James. Kirk Road 

Waddell, Mrs R. , Caledonian Road 

Wardrop, Robert, Main Street 

Watt, James & William, Cambusnethan 

Watt, Marion, Cambusnethan 

Watt, Robert, Stewarton Street 

Woodrow, Robert, West Thornlie Street 

Young, Mrs, Kirk Road 

HAIRDRESSERS.— See Barbers. 

HATTERS. 

Fisher, Donald, Main Street 
Lambie, Thomas R., Main Street 

HERBALIST. 

Weir, James, 170 Main Street 

HOTEL-KEEPERS. 

Hamilton, J. & T. (Royal), Main Street 
M'ArUiur, Mrs (Railway), South Station 
Nelson, Charles (Crown), Caledonian Road 



83 

IRONMASTERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 
Belhaven Iron & Steel & Patent Nail Coy., Limited. 
Coltness Iron Coy., Limited, Newmains (Coal and Ironmasters) 
Etna Iron & Steel Coy., Craigneuk 
Glasgow Iron & Steel Coy. (Coal and Ironmasters) 
Pather Iron & Steel Coy., Limited 

Williams, John, & Coy., Excelsior Iron Works (Coal and Iron- 
masters) 

IRONMONGERS. 

Carrie, James, Kirk Road 
Morton & Sons, Belhaven Terrace 
Ritchie, John, Main Street 
Smith, John, Main Street 
Smith, Alexander, Kirk Road 
Smith, Alexander, Newmains 
Smith & Co. , Main Street 
Waddell, William, Russell Street 
Walters, Benjamin, Main Street 
Wardrop, R. , Main Street 

JOINERS, CABINETMAKERS, &c. 

Baird, Andrew, Overtown 

Cochrane, Thomas, Kirk Road 

Campbell, Thomas, Cabinet Show-rooms, Main Street 

Fraser, James, Shand Street 

Galloway, James, Craigneuk 

Gibb, W., Main Street 

Graham, James — Cabinet Show-rooms, Stewarton Street 

Main & Co. — Cabinet Show-room, Kirk Road 

M'Innes, P., & Co. — Coach-works, Marshall Street 

Nimmo, D. & W., Main Street 

Prentice, John, Graham Street 

Smellie, Alexander, Allanbank, Newmains 

Sommerville, Richard, Newmains 

Thomson, John, Stewarton Street 

Watson, John, Cambusnethan 

Stevenson, A., Cambusnethan 

Steel, James, Cambusnethan 

Steel, John, Kirk Road 

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S OUTFITTERS. 

Smith, A. & M., Main Street 

MASONS.— See Builders. 

MILLINERS AND DRESSMAKERS. 
Banks, James, Caledonian Road 
Blackadder, Mrs, Main Street 
Brown, Miss, Craigneuk 



84 

Caldwell, Mrs, Main Street 

Dickson, Mrs, Main Street , 

Gibb, J. & M. , Newmains 

Gibson, Mrs, Main Street 

Gold, Mrs, Cambusnethan 

Gray, Miss, Kirk Road 

Hay, Miss, Main Street 

Marshall & Young, Main Street 

M'Kendrick, Miss, Main Street 

Miller, Miss, Cambusnethan 

Mitchell, John, Main Street 

Muir, Miss, Main Street 
Prentice, Margaret, Overtown 
Richmond, Mrs, Craigneuk 
Russell & Anderson, Cambusnethan 
Shirlaw, Miss, Cambusnethan 
Smith, Miss, Craigneuk 
Somerville, William, Kirk Road 
Steele, Mrs, Main Street 
Swan, Mrs, Overtown 
Thomson & M'Neil, Main Street 
Wallace, John, Kirk Road 
Williams, M. & F. , Main Street 

ORCHARD-KEEPERS. 

Ballantyne, William, Pathhead 

Bobbie, John, Erskinebank 

Byer & Weir, Lower Carbarns 

Gibb, Alexander, & Son, East Belmont 

Cunningham, James, Kirkhill Farm 

George, Janet, Carbarns- wood 

Haddow, R. , Garrionburn 

Hamilton, Mrs, The Ben 

Hamilton, J., Junr., Castlehill 

Hamilton, William, Lower Callander and Alicia Lank 

Hamilton, John, Gertrude Bank 

Laurie, Mrs William, East Ranald's 

Loudon, James, Lucinda Bank 

M'Culloch, Mrs Jean, and Mary, Wemyss Bank 

M'Culloeh, Alexander, Upper Callander 

M'Lachlan, Alexander, Hopefield and Burham Bank 

Martin, Robert, Wemysshill 

Merrilees, William, Trotterbank 

Millar, Mrs A. and Mr Archibald, Stewart Bank 

Naismith, James, West Belmont 

Pettigrew, Peter, Carbarns 

Pollock, J., Kirkhill 

Prentice, Mrs John, Rosebank 

Wyllie, William, Blair's 



85 

PAINTERS, GLAZIERS, AND PAPERHANGERS. 
Bairrl, J., Caledonian Road 
Campbell, Thomas, Main Street 
Leggat, James B., Main Street 

M'Minn, John P., Kirk Road (oil and colour merchant) 
M'Clure, Wm. G. F., Kirk Road 

PAWNBROKERS. 

Cowan, Robert, Kirk Road 

Fulton, James, & Co., Glasgow Road 

Johnstone, R. , West End Cross 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 

Reid, Charles, Young Street 

PLUMBERS, GASFITTERS, &c. 

Brownlie, James, Stewarton Street 
Laing Brothers, Kirk Road 
M'Ewan, John, Main Street 
Morton & Sons, Belhaven Terrace 
Waddell, William, Russell Street 

POTATO MERCHANTS. 

Cummings, Matthew, Overtown 

Keir Brothers (stores, back of Crown Hotel). 

Hunter, James, Glen Road 

PRINTERS. 

Graham, T. & J. W. , Cambusnethan 

Pomphrey, William, Press Office, Post Office Buildings, Main 

Street. Works — Park Street. 
Reid & Aberdein, Main Street 

RESTAURANTS, EATING-HOUSES, &c. 

Campbell, James, Stewarton Street 
Denholm, Thomas, Stewarton Street 
Forbes, James, Hill Street and Craigneuk 
Gourlay, Mrs Robert, Stewarton Street 
Hunter, Mrs James, Caledonian Road 
Jackson, William, Main Street 
Sandilands, William, Main Street 
Taylor, John, Main Street 

SADDLERS. 

Dyet, Robert, Kirk Road 

Loudon, Thomas, & Son, Caledonian Road 

Millar, Andrew, Kirk Road 

SALT MERCHANT. 

Gibson, Thomas — Salt Stores, Newmains 



SAW-MILLERS. 

Thomson, John, Bellvicw Sa"w Mills 
Watt, James, Victoria Saw Mills 

SCULPTOR. 

Camming, David, Cambusnethan 

SERVANTS' REGISTRIES. 

Ewing, J. & M., Main Street 

Forsyth, Mrs, Main Street 

Gold, Mrs, Cambusnethan 

Mu die, Mrs, Main Street 

Thomson, Mrs, Caledonian Road Dairy 

SHOEMAKERS. 

Alexander, David, Cambusnethan 

Allison, Alexander, Stevvarton Street 

Binnie, E. A., Main Street 

Bryson, Alexander, Cambusnethan 

Crichton, Agnes, Newmains 

Cuthbert & Son,- Main Street 

Douglas, John, Kirk Road 

Fleming, Andrew, Newmains 

Forbes, Robert, Caledonian Road 

Gray, John, Newmains 

Gray, John & Co., Main Street (Manager, John Hamilton) 

Hepburn, William, Cambusnethan 

Hodge, Misses, Kirk Road 

Inglis, P. , Cambusnethan 

Kerr, John, Overtown 

Knox, Joseph, Belhaven Road 

Laing, David, Shieldmuir 

Loudon, David, Newmains 

Mackie, A., Caledonian Road 

M'Crae, James, Kirk Road 

M'Lecs, James, Main Street 

M'Kendriek, George, Main Street 

Newlands, James, Main Street (Manager, A. Cunningham) 

Paterson, John & Co., Main Street 

Sinclair, James, Glasgow Road 

The People's Boot Warehouse, Main Street 

Young, George, Main Street 

Young, James, Main Street 

SLATERS AND PLASTERERS. 

Black, W. & R., Millar Place 
Clark, R., Kirk Road 
George, Thomas, Shand Street 



87 

SOLICITORS. 

Burgess & Smith, Commercial Bank 

Logan, John, Main Street 

Morrison & Thomson, Clydesdale Bank and Carluke 

SPIRIT-DEALERS— (See also Grocers). 

Brown, James, Commercial Inn) Main Street 

Cleland, Matthew, Cambusnethan 

Condie, John, Main Street 

Fleming, Robert, Cambusnethan 

Gibb, Mrs John, Main Street 

Gold, John, Waterloo 

Macgregor, W., West-end Cross 

M'Arthur, Mrs, Miller Place and Overtown 

M'Lean, Charles, Main Street 

M'Lauchlan, Hugh, Caledonian Road 

Pender, Benjamin, Main Street 

Rodger, James, Main Street 

Rodger, Hugh, Kirk Road 

Scott, John, Clydesdale Inn, Craigneuk 

Scott, Agnes, Stewarton Street 

Scott, Miss C. , Cross-Keys, Stewarton Street 

Smith, John, Main Street 

Stalker, George, Craigneuk 

Stewart, Janet, Cambusnethan 

Strain, W. , Main Street 

Sweeney, Mrs John, Stewarton Inn 

Watson, Willam, Cambusnethan and West-end Cross 

Young, James, Overtown 

STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS. 

Archibald, R. (Mrs Robertson), Main Street 

Ewing, J. & M., Main Street 

Gilfillan, James, Overtown 

Hamilton, John, Cambusnethan 

Hay, Alexander, Main Street 

M'Kenna, John, Craigneuk 

M'Raith, Robert, Main Street 

Mudie, Charles, Main Street 

Pomphrey, William, Post-Oifice Buildings, Main Street 

Prentice Thomas, Overtown 

Reid & Aberdein, Main Street 

Russell, John, Waterloo 

Wilson, William, Newmains 

SURGEONS. 

Cochrane, James, Main Street 
Cowan, John, Orchard Villa 
Duff, W., Orchard Villa 
Hudson, J., Overtown 
Livingstone, James, Hill Street 



Livingstone, William, Hill Street 
Livingstone, Robert, Hill Stjreet 
Logan, J. Main Street 
Millar, John, Mossview, Newmains 
Russell, W., Auchterhall, Newmains 

TAILORS AND CLOTHIERS. 

Anderson, James, Main Street 

Andrew, Robert C. , Newmains 

Banks, .Tames, Caledonian Road 

Brown, William, Cambusnethan 

Brownlie & Russell, Main Street 

Bryce, Thomas, Overtown 

City Warehouse, Main Street 

Clark, George, Anderson Street 

Connacher, David, Main Street 

Currie, J. & A., Cambusnethan 

Ellis, R. , West Thornlie Street 

Fraser, R. B. , Main Street 

Gibson, Alexander, Main Street 

Gibson, Robert, & Co., Kirk Road and Main Street 

Hamilton, Andrew, Main Street 

Hepburn, David, Cambusnethan 

Herd, James, Overtown 

King, John, Stewarton Street 

Laurie, James, Main Street 

Littlejohn, James, & Co., Main Street 

Littlejohn, John, Main Street 

Loehhead, Alexander, Main Street 

Mackay, A., West-End Cross 

Mackay, John, Main Street 

Marshall & Young, Main Street 

Milne, James M., Main Street 

Millar, James, Main Street 

Mitchell, John, Main Street 

Moffat, Andrew, Hill Street 

Paterson, W., Caledonian Road 

Penman, Charles W., Caledonian Road 

Plenderleith, Alexander, Main Street 

Ross, W. G., Glasgow Road 

Somerville, William, Kirk Road 

Wilson, James, Kirk Road 

TOBACCONISTS. 

Davidson, Robert, Main Street 
Fallow, James B., Main Street 
King, John, Stewarton Street 
Leggat, James B. , Main Street 
M'Callum, Duncan, Main Street 
Sharp, William, Belhaven Road 
Wingate, Andrew, Caledonian Road 



VETERINARY SURGEONS. 

Campbell, Archibald, M.R.C.V.S., Stewarton Street 
Gilchrist, T. K, M.R.C.V.S., Beltonfoot Cottage 
Gray, Charles, M.R.C.V.S. , Kirk Road 

WATCH AND CLOCK MAKERS. 

Blackley, William, Main Street 
Gibb, Walter, Kirk Road 
M'Culloch, James, Main Street 
Morton, William, Cambusnethan 
Morrison Brothers, Newmains 
Phillips, James, Newmains 

WRIGHTS— (See also Joiners). 
Baillie, John, Kirk Road 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Allan, Thomas, inspector of poor, Campbell Street 

Anderson, William, coalmaster, Morningside Co. ; residence, 

St. Ann's, Morningside Drive, Edinburgh 
Armour, Andrew, superintendent, Cambusnethan Cemetery 

Bartlett, Charles, excise officer, Kirk Road 

Bell, Mrs Andrew, Greenfield House 

Bell, Thomas, coalmaster, &c. , Main Street 

Booth, R., organist, Coltness Memorial Church, Cambusnethan. 

Booth, C. , Sanitary Inspector (County Council), Glen Road 

Boyd, John, joiner, <fcc, Coltness 

Boyne, A. , manager, Distillei'y 

Brownlie, Thomas, Bonkle 

Burt, James, clerk, The Green Farm 

Calderhead, Robert, forester, Coltness 
Carmichael, William, postmaster, Main Street 
Chalmers, William, bandmaster, Cambusnethan 
Cole & Gibb, Father Pit 

Dalziel, Miss Jessie, Cawdor Cottage, Kirk Road 

Dalziel, Misses, Stewarton Street 

Danks, Henry, manager, Green Colliery 

Davis, E., ironworks manager, Victoria Villa, Pather 

Dewar, Thomas, colliery manager, Glasgow Road 

Dobbie, James, Leslie Place, Newmains 

Douglas, Robert (of Belhaven Nail Co.), Belhaven Terrace 

Dow, Thomas, farm-overseer, Lower Carbarns 

Ferrans, Wm., commission agent, Kirk Road 
Fisher, A. M., music-teacher, Main Street 



90 

Forsyth, W., goods agent, Central Station 
Frew, Wm., manager, Craigneuk 

Gibb, James, Shandfield House 

Grbson, James, foundry manager, Caledonian Road 

Gordon, G. C. , manager, Nether ton House 

Graham, James, missionary, Miller Place 

Gray, James, book-keeper, The Cottages, Ncvvmains 

Grey, James, colliery manager, Morningside 

Green, Alexander, overseer, Allanton 

Hamilton, James, Newmains House, Newmains 

Heggie, James, "Scottish Legal" insurance agent, Braeeide 

Cottage 
Henderson, J. R., organist Wishaw Parish Church, Main Street 
Hepburn, Mark, commission agent, Cambusnethan 
Hinshalwood, Alexander, clerk of works, Coltness 
Hislop, Ambrose, Over town 
Hornell, Alexander, Campbell Street 
Hislop, John, excise officer, West Thornlie Street 
Hotchkiss, William, manager, Excelsior Cottage 
Houlds worth, James, J. P., D.L., of Coltness 
Houldsworth, James Hamilton, Jun. (Scots Greys), Coltness 

House. 
Houldsworth, Walter J., J. P., Coltness House 
Hughes, James, The Station-House, Wishaw South 
Hunting, J. S., ironworks manager, Main Street 

Jackson, Douglas, colliery manager, Newmains 
James, Thomas, manager, Craigneuk 

Kerr, John, portioner, Quarry Street 
King, William, quarrymaster, Caledonian Road 
Kirkland, Mrs John, Woodside, Newmains 
Kirkpatrick Thos. , passenger agent, Wishaw Central 
Knox, James, colliery manager, Morningside 

Leggate & Sons, coal-mines, Father 

Leitch & Simpson, Burnhall coal-mine, Waterloo 

Lindsay, Mrs John, Shand Street 

Lindsay, William, burgh collector, Young Street, 

Lockhart, Graeme Alexander, C.B., J. P., Major-General, Cam'- 

nethan House 
London, George S., brick and tile-maker, Newmains 
Lyle, Thomas, clerk, Morningside 

MacDonald, Duncan, cashier, Distillery House 
Menzies, Andrew, Lea Cottage, Graham Street 



91 

Millen, T. W., cashier, Glencairn House 

Morton, William, portioner, Caledonian Road 

Morton, Robert, coalmaster, Morningside Co. ; residence, 
Manor Park, Coatbridge 

Mnir, Robert, forester, Murdostoun 

Muirhead, , manager, Flemington 

M'Callum, Alexander, missionary, Main Street 

M'Gill, Quintin, furnace manager, Caledonian Road 

M'Gregor, Alexander, engineer, Stonecraigs Cottage, New- 
mains 

M'Intyre, John F., The Distillery 

M'Kay, Donald, portioner, Caledonian Road 

M'Millan, William, brick manufacturer, &c, Orchard Place. 

M'Murtrie, Thomas, clerk, Ironside Cottage 

to 'Neil, James, mineral inspector, Glenclelland House 

Oliver, Alexander D. , cashier, The Cottages, Newmains 

Pettigrew, Mrs, Post-Office Buildings 

Pettigrew, the Misses, South View Cottage, Belhaveu Terrace 

Poulton, James K. , cashier, Lochfield Cottage 

Rankin, William, coal merchant, 242 Low Main Street 

Rattray, Thomas, Kirk Road „ 

Renwick, Mrs, Kirkhill 

Riddell, James, coalmaster, &c, Helenslea, Belhaven Terrace 

Ross, Mrs, Sub-Postmistress, Glasgow Road 

Russell, James, Sedan Cottage, Newmains 

Russell, Robert, mineral manager, Whitestripe, Newmains 

Russell, Thomas, M.E. , Anderson Street, Cambusnethan 

Scott, James, Garrion Tower, Overtown 

Scott, James, commercial manager, Plevna Cottage, Newmains 

Shearer, Andrew, Mansefield, Glen Road 

Simpson, William, coalmaster, Morningside Co., Auchter 

House, Newmains 
Smith, H. J., Ph.D., chemist, Newmains 
Smith, Mrs, Young Street 
Smith, Mrs, Glenview, Kirk Road 
Somerville, the Misses, Glenview, Kirk Road 
Steele, James, manager, Pickering's Waggon-Works 
Steele, Thomas, assistant inspector, Young Street 
Steuart, Sir Alan H. Seton, of Allanton and Touch, Stirling 
Stewart, Robert King, J. P., Murdostoun Castle, Newmains 
Summers, A. B. , inland revenue officer, Alicelee, Berryhill 
Swinnerton, Thos., insurance and commission agent, Sannox 

Cottage 



92 

Tait, James, M.E. & C.E., Meadowview, Kirk Road 

Thomson, Thomas, Low Main Street 

Thorn, Neil, colliery salesman, Newmains 

Turner, William, colliery manager, Chapel, Newmains 

Turnbull, James, stationmaster, Overtown 

Walton, J. P., chemist, Belhaven Terrace 

Wardlaw, John, colliery manager, Overtown 

Watson, William, road surveyor, Caledonian Road 

Watson, John, stationmaster, Newmains 

Watt, Miss, teacher, Newmains 

Wight, William, supervisor, Belmont House, Thornlie Street 

Williams, John, J. P., The Green 

Williams, Robert, The Green 

Williams, Alfred H., The Green 

Williams, John, manager, Craigneuk 

Wilson, John, coalmaster, Overtown, Law and Shawfield 

residence, Dechmont Lodge, Bothwell 
Wilson, Quintin, brickworks manager, Caledonian Road 
Wotherspoon, John, Muirhouse, by Motherwell 
Wycherley, A.N., agent for American organs, Kirk Road 



SHOTTS SECTION. 

Including Omoa, Cleland, Auchinlea, Greenhill, Stane, Dykehead, 
and the western -part of the Parish. 



CLELAND AND OMOA, &c. 

Agnew, John, manager, Omoa Fire-Clay Works 
Allardice, James, farmer, Westmuir, Holytown 

Baird, M., farmer, Brownhill, Newarthill 

Barr & Higgins, coalmasters, Langbyres and Bellside Collieries, 

Cleland 
Barrie & Ferguson, Ravenshall Coal Co., Cleland 
Barrie, James, Craighead, Salsburgh, Holytown 
Baxter, John, sexton, Shotts Kirk, Holytown 
Brown, Peter, flesher, Cleland 
Brown, George, grocer, Salsburgh, Holytown 
Brownlie, George, farmer, Salsburgh, Holytown 
Bruce, Robert, grocer and spirit merchant, Bellside Store 
Buchan, Dr, Mayville, Cleland 

Cameron, Rev. Duncan, E.C. Manse, Cleland 

Campbell, Thomas, colliery manager, Spindleside Cottage, 

Cleland 
Carrol, John, grocer, fee, Omoa 
Clark, James, farmer, Auchinlea 
Connor, Arthur, shoemaker, Cleland 
Co-operative Store, Cleland (manager, James Smith) 
Cooper, Charles, farmer, Spindleside, Cleland 
Cullen, Gavin, farmer, Swinstie, Cleland 



94 

Denholm, Thomas, farmer, Greenhill, Holytown 
Dick, Robert, coalmaster, Knownoble, Cleland 

Ferguson, David, fruit-merchant, Cleland 

Ferguson, James, farmer, Fairnieshaw, Holytown 

Ferguson, Robert, grocer, Cleland 

Forrester, Wm., spirit merchant, Salsburgh, Holytown 

Ford, Robert, farmer, Knownoble, Cleland 

Frame, James, spirit merchant. Salsburgh, Holytown 

Fuller, Rev. M., R.C. Manse, Cleland 

Gibb, Thomas, & Sons, quarrymasters and brick manufacturers, 

Auchinlea 
Gray, Josiah, shoemaker, Cleland 
Grieve, William, teacher, Greenhill Schoolhouse, Holytown 

Hamilton, Robert, shoemaker, Meadowside, Cleland 
Hamilton, J. & T., merchants, Cleland 
Higgins, William, coalmaster, Bedside 
Howie, John, baker, Cleland 
Home, Rev. G., F.C. Manse, Cleland 

Jack, Robert, storekeeper, Greenhill, Holytown 
Johnston, James, clerk, Auchinlea 

King. Thomas, & Co., quarrymasters and brick manufacturers, 
Bedside 

Laurie, Thomas, joiner, Hareshaw, Holytown 

Lithgow, Dr, Cleland 

Lithgow, Thomas, colliery manager, Langbyres Cottage, Cleland 

Lochhead, Alexander, Sen., tilemaker, Greenhill, Holytown 

Lochhead, Alexander, Junr., tilemaker, Greenhill, Holytown 

Longmuir, John, farmer, Peatpots, Hohytown 

Loudon, Andrew, foreman quarryman, Auchinlea 

Loudon, John, builder, Willow Cottage, Cleland 

Loudon, Robert, draper, Cleland 

Loudon, Robert, joiner, Cleland 

Loudon, W. & T., farmers, Muirhouses, Cleland 

Loudon, William, farmer, Penty, Cleland 

Liddell, James, blacksmith, Cleland 

Mackie, Thomas, Roughdyke, Holytown 

Marshall, James, Whitecraighead, Cleland 

Marshall, John, blacksmith, Minniehall Cottage, Holytown 

Marshall, Thomas, farmer, Goodoakhill, Holytown 

Martin, Thomas, stationmaster, Omoa 

Mason, Alexander, slaughter-house, Omoa Foundry 



95 

Menzies, James, quarry foreman, Bellside 

Milligan, Peter, School Board Officer, Cleland 

Milligan, Peter, Jun. , colliery manager, Cleland 

Mitchell, David, farmer, Jersey, Cleland 

Morris, Win. , grocer and carriage-hirer, Salsburgh, Holy town 

Moffat J., ironfounder, Omoa 

Mungle, Wm„ farm overseer, Windyedge, Cleland 

Munro, James, manure manufacturer, Tillanburn, Holytown 

Murray, William, farmer, Hill of Murdostoun, Cleland 

M'Culluch, R., spirit merchant, Salsburgh, Holytown 

M'Donald, John, Sen., colliery manager, Bellside House, 

Cleland 
M'Phun, Mrs, sub- postmistress, Cleland 
M'Millan, William, storekeeper, Auchinlea 
M'Millan, Wilson, grocer and spirit merchant, Cleland 

Nimmo, Henry, carter, Cleland 
Noble, David, flesher, Cleland 

Paterson, Alexander, teacher and registrar, Shotts Kirk, Holy- 
town 
Paterson. James, of Knownoble, Cleland 
Paterson, William, farmer, Biggarford, Cleland 
Pollock, William, C. E. ,, South Lanridge, Holytown 

Rennie, James, quarry foreman, Auchinlea 

Riddell, D., spirit merchant, Cleland 

Russell, William, & Son, boiler-makers, Cleland 

Scobbie, James & Co., Fortisset Colliery, Holytown 

Scott, Mrs, Dalrymple Cottage, Cleland 

Scott, John, spirit merchant, Cleland 

Smellie, Samuel, joiner, &c. , Bellside Sawmills, Cleland 

Smith, D. M., farmer, Birniehill, Holytown 

Smith, Thomas, grocer, Cleland 

Spence, William, teacher and registrar, Cleland 

Stewart, William, farm grieve, Midhill, Holytown 

Taylor & King, quarrymasters and brick manufacturers, 

Auchinlea 
Thomson, M. D., grocer, Salsburgh, Holytown 

Weir, John, farmer, Shottsburn, Holytown 

Weir, John, innkeeper and farmer, Shotts Inn, Holytown 

Watson, James, brickworks foreman, Bellside 

Wilson, Thomas, farmer, Shotts Myres, Holytown 

Young, Robert, coalmaster, Greenhill, Holytown 



96 
STANE AND DYKEHEAD.— (Postal Address, "Shotts.") 
Allardice, William, land steward, Hartwoodhill 

Baillie, Ludovic, farmer, Muir Yett 

Barr, Alexander, Dyke Inn 

Benhar Coal Co., Hartwood 

Bennet, Alex., draper, Dykehead 

Birkenshaw Coal Co., Springbank 

Blair, John, M.D., Gordon Cottage, Dykehead 

Brownlie, Mrs Robert, farmer, Stonebent 

Bryce, Agnes, milliner, Stane 

Calder, William, watchmaker, Stane 
Caldwell, John, M.D., Zebra Cottage 
Cooper, Mary, grocer, Dykehead 
Cowan, William, grocer, Stane 
Cunningham, Alex., tailor and clothier, Stane 
Cunningham, William, stationmaster 

Darling, Andrew, coalmaster, Calderhead Colliery. 

Deas, J. S., Hartwoodhill 

Denholm, JoanL., dressmaker, Dykehead 

Dollar, Andrew, Spiinghill 

Donaldson, James, draper, Stane 

Dykehead and Shotts Co-operative Society 

Fisher, , manager, Shotts House 

Forsyth, Alex., farmer, Baton 

Forrest, John, grocer, Stane 

Forrest, Lawrence, shoemaker, Dykehead 

Forrest, Peter, J. P., of Hairmyres, Commercial Bank, Shotts 

Gardiner, John, farmer, Dykehead 
Gibson, Charles, manager, Hartwood 
Gilbertson, Angus, shoemaker, Dykehead 
Gilchrist, Rev. Robert, F.C. Manse, Dykehead 
Gilchrist, Robert, shoemaker, Stane 
Gillespie, Alex. , grocer and draper, Dykehead 
Gillespie, Catherine, draper, Dykehead 
Gilfillan, John, mason, Stane 
Gillon, Duncan, watchmaker, Stane 
Gilmour, Miss Margaret, Stane 
Goldie, James, manager, Dykehead 
Gray, Daniel, shoemaker, Stane 

Hamilton, Hugh, blacksmith 
Hamilton, Thomas, farmer, Knowton 
Hamilton, James, police sergeant, Stane 



Hamilton, Mrs Margaret, baker, Dykehead 
Hamilton, Mrs Thomas, post-office, Dykehead 
Henderson, John, potato and grain merchant, Stane 
Henderson, Andrew, carrier and grain merchant 
Henry, Wm. , saddler, Dykehead 
Hunter, John, flesher, Dykehead 
Hunter, James, farmer, Stane 
Hutton, John, accountant, Calderside Terrace 

Jeffrey, colliery manager, Ladylands 

Kinnis, James, Newmill 

Kerr, Wm., farmer, Starry shaw 

King, James, inspector of poor, Viewtield 

Lambie, Thomson, farmer, Blairhead 

Leiper, Robert, farmer, Hillhouseridge 

Lindsay, George, ironfounder, &c. , Calderhead foundry 

Lindsay, John, wright, Stane 

Loudon, Wm., joiner, Stane 

Maguire, Robert, grocer, Calderside 

Marshall, Win., goods agent (N.B.R. ), Stane 

Miller, Janet Frame, grocer, Stane 

Miller, Rev. P., R.C. Chapel, Stane 

Moffat, Wm., farmer, Darngavel 

Morningside Coal Co. , Baton, Springbank 

Mackin, Mary A., R.C. School, Stane 

Mackintosh, Donald, J. P., headmaster, F.C. School, Dykehead 

M'Nab, Robert, headmaster, Calderhead School 

M'Nair, Thos., spirit merchant, Dykehead 

M'Phun, Jessie, sab-postmistress, Shotts 

M'Vey, David, Station Hotel, Shotts 

Muir, James, butcher, Stane 

O'Neil, James, shopkeeper, Dykehead 

Paterson, Jane, stationer, Stane 
Paterson, James, flesher, &c, Stane 
Paton, James, shoemaker, Stane 
Peacock, Andrew, farmer, Curryside 
Pender, Benjamin, farmer, West Tarbrax 
Pettigrew, William, farmer, Blackhall 

Ramsay, Mrs Janet, grocer, Stane 
Ramsay, James, grocer and flesher, Stane 
Richardson, John, farmer, Stane 
Russell, Miss, milliner, Stane 



98 

Russell, Rev. Robert, E. U. Manse, Stane 
Rutherford, Rev. R. W., B.D., Manse, Calderhead 

Scott, Hugh, Railway Hotel, Stane 

Shannon, Jas. D., news-agent, Dykehead 

Sharp, G. , manager, Burnside House 

Skerry, James, grocer, Stane 

Shirlaw, William, tailor, Stane 

Sinclair, J.B., farmer, Calderhead 

Shotts Iron Company 

Smith, Adam, joiner, Stane 

Smith, Adam, jun., grocer, &c, Stane 

Smith, John, draper and tailor, Stane 

Sneddon & Sons, coalmasters, Greystonelea Colliery 

Sneddon, Robert, Hillhouseridge 

Sommerville, James, ironmonger, Stane 

Steel, John, farmer, Kepplehill 

Stevenson, William, ironmonger, Dykehead 

Strickland, Joseph, farmer 

Thomson, Margaret, farmer, Rosehall 

Torrance, Mrs Mary, draper, Stane 

Torrance, W. & J., drapers, Stane 

Turnbull, A. W., general manager, Shotts Iron Co. 

Twaddle, Henry, Shotts Store 

Watt, John, farmer, Balbackie 

Wilson, John, farmer, Fortisset Mains 

Wilson, Miss Maggie, milliner, Stane 

Wilson, Robert, land steward, Fortisset 

Wilson, William, manager, Dykehead Co-operative Store 

Wyper, James, farmer, Ladyland 

Youngson, John, carriage-hirer, Dykehead 



Wisbaw Directory advertiser. 



PO LLOC K'S 

Is the Place you can always rely on 
having a 

LARGE & VARIED STOCK TO CHOOSE FROM. 



;ao000000000000000000000003000 



As all our Goods are bought for Cash in the 
First Markets, we are in the position to Sell at 
All Times 

30 per Cent. Cheaper 
than , at Credit Shops or $mall Warehouses. 

. QPPOpOO©OpOOODOOpOPpOOOOOOOOpC 

A DDRES S— 

S>. fr f>ollock, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Grocer and Provision Merchant, 

110 MAIN STREET, 

"W ISHA W. 



j2» Selectefc 




^V>. 



Specially W 



I 



amcs 




Draper, Clothier, 

AND 

General Outfitter, 
65 fIDain Street, 

WISHAW. 

Inspection Invited. 




«<9 



III 



DRAPER, CLOTHIER, AND (OUTFITTER, 

2S@> Mate Stee#tt WI&Imw. 



-Xh>o^- 



A Large and Varied Selection of GENTLEMEN'S SUITINGS, 
TROUSERINGS, COATINGS, &c, Always on Hand. 



acoocooooccccoccoo 



Perfect Fit and Style Guaranteed. 



□ooooooooooooooooo 



Great Variety of Prints, Dress Goods, and Drapery. 




o/m 




; 



FAMILY WINE MERCHANT, 

*0 WISH A W. ^ 

[ESTABLISHED 1832. 

OOOOOOD0000000003033C333a3S30000000a333030D 

The undenoted Brands of Fine Whiskies always in Stock 

JUIA, 12 Years Old. 

GLEN-GRANT, GLENLIVET, 8 Years Old. 

LONG JOHN'S BEN-NEVIS, 8 Years Old. 

Fine Old Whiskies, @ 15/- 16/- 17/- and 18/- per gallon. 

John Jameson & Son's FAMOUS DUBLIN 

WHISKY, 6 Years Old, in Bulk or Gallon. 

The Premier Brand of Irish Whisky. 



A Large Stock of PORTS, SHERRIES, and CLARETS of the 
Finest Brands — Old in Bottles. 

Choice Brands of Champagnes- 

Piper — Heidsieck Tre Sec, 1885 Vintage. 
Pierner — Jouet Pale Dry Creaming, 1885 Vintage. 

Bass & Allsopp's Ales and Stouts. 

In Cask and Bottle. 



Combe & Covs London Extra and Imperial 

STOUT — In Cask and Bottle. 



+ -1- -r ± ± + 



RARE OLD 

inland Jhi^kg 
42/- per doz. case. 



Delivered Free at any 
Railway Station in Eng- 
land or Scotland. 



LIQUEURS. 

Curacoa ( Fockinks). 

Maraschino (Drioli). 

Heering's 

( Copenhagen). 

Cherry Brandy. 



± -i- ± + + 



Sample Bottle 

OF CHOICE 



ighland phi^kg 

Post Free 
to any address for 

4/- 



joint m^MWMm^ 

GAS - FITTER, ZINC - WORKER, 
Sanitary Engineer, &c, 



^^c? aW Orders Punctually Attended to. 



SHORT 

STORIES 



A\ 'GOOD THING. 



GOOD THING is worth say- 
ing as many times as one can 
say it, and so long as there are people to listen to it, " A 
good thing cannot be spoiled." 



A T1UI T H I N G. 

/fl%VER Nine Hundred and Ninety Times we have an- 
V#^ nounced that Shoes sold by us 
wear longer, fit neater, and cost less 
than all others, and we purpose an- 
nouncing this fact until everybody 
knows it as well as he knows his abc. 



ABOUT 
BUSINESS. 



JOHN PATERSON & Co., 30 Main St. 



«^M. LAURIE,^ 

FAMILY GROCER AND WINE MERCHANT, 

36 Caledonian Road, Wishaw. 



Groceries and Provisions of the Best Quality. 

Bottled Beer and Porter always in Fine Condition. 
All Wines and Spirits Guaranteed Genuine. 

Watcbmafeer, Jeweller, ant> ©ptician, 

11 MAIN STREET, 
+ + +' WISHAW. -i- + + 

ESTABLISHED HALF-A-CENTURY. 



D. 


cummi 


1}G; 




Cam' 


N ETHAN, 

WISHAW. 


House 


: VINE COTTAGE. 





^rctcftcaf gaffer, 

18 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 

Has always in Stock a Splendid Assortment of Hats and Caps 
in all the Newest Shapes. 

Hats Altered and Dressed, and Umbrellas Covered and 
Repaired on the Premises. 



4 t C O t 

BELHAVEN TERRACE, 
-w i s iee: .a. -w_ 



H)rgsalter ant) ©il ZlDercbant, 

<? *4 (N OttT H (§ O £ U RG (§TttEET, 
G I* it S G O W. 

Paints, Colours, Varnishes, Brushes, Glues, Glass Paper, 
and Emery Cloth. 

ASSETS, DEBT RECOVERY, AND MERCANTILE 
ENQUIRY OFFICE, 

132 BRANDON STREET, 

MOTHEEWELIi. 



JOHN CASSELS, 

Accountant, J50eriff anb 3*(p* Officer. 
Businesses Bought & Sold on the most Reasonable Terms, 

Legal Diligencies executed for the Lanark, Glasgow, Hamilton, 
Airdrie, and Wishaw Sheriff and J. P. Courts ; Accountancy or Legal 
Work done for the Lanarkshire Trade Guardian and Gazette, published 
by J. & F. Cassels & Co. , Douglas Terrace, Hamilton. AH Orders 
promptly attended to on Private or Legal Business. 



JOHN CASSELS, 132 Brandon Street, Motherwell, 




THE TRES BONANZA WAREHOUSE 

Is the Most Popular Place of Business in Wishaw. 

THE TRES BONANZA MAINTAINS ITS REPUTATION AS THE 
LEADING MANTLE HOUSE. 

l^aP" Nothing to compare with it, in or out of Wishaw. Come and see 
the Latest Novelties in Jackets, Mantles, and Capes. Hundreds to 
choose from. Sizes and Prices to suit all Customers. 

See Our Millinery Novelties for the Coming Season. 
Dressmaking — In the Newest and Most Becoming Modes, at the 

Most Moderate Charges. 
Ready-Made Clothing Department — Extraordinary Value in 

Boys', Youths', and Men's Suits. Keenest Prices on record. 



The Tres Bonanza is the Cheapest House in the Trade for— 

MEN'S MERCERY, WHITE & SCARLET FLANNELS, SHEETINGS, 
UMBRELLAS, TOWELLINGS, BLANKETS, 

GLOVES, HANDKERCHIEFS, CURTAINS, 

TIES, BED & TABLE LINEN, CRETONNES, 

BRACES, FLANNELETTES, SHIRTINGS. 

YARNS, HABERDASHERY, AND SMALL WARES. 

$iP Come and Buy at the Tres Bonanza, where the Largest Variety 
and the very Best Value is found. Remember our Motto — Semper 
Eadem. 

JAMES M. MILNE, Proprietor, 
THE TRES BONANZA, WISHAW. 



AMERICA, INDIA, and MEDITERRANEAN. 

GLASGOW TO NEW YORK 

EVERY THURSDAY. 



S.S. CITY OF ROME, 


- 8144 Tons. 


1 S.S. FURNESSIA, - 


- 5495 Tons. 


S.S. ANCHORIA, 


• 4167 „ 


S.S. ETHIOPIA, 


- 4004 „ 


S.S. CIROASSIA, 


- 4272 „ 


| S.S. DEVONIA, 


- 4270 „ 



NEW YORK to GLASGOW 

EVERY SATURDAY. 

To NEW YORK, BOSTON, or PHILADELPHIA— Saloon Fares up to Twenty-one 
Guineas. Second Cabin and Steerage at Reduced Rates. Special Terms to 
Tourists and Parties. 

The "City of Rome" and "Furnessia" are fitted throughout with Electric 
Light, and have excellent accommodation for all classes of Passengers. 

Special TXbrougb 3Boofeings to tbc WllorlS's (Columbian Exposition, Chicago. 



MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE. 

GLASGOW for GIBRALTAR, GENOA, LEGHORN, NAPLES, MESSINA, 
PALERMO, and TRIESTE Fortnishtly. 



GLASGOW & LIVERPOOL to BOMBAY & CALCUTTA, 

Via SUEZ CANAL, WEEKLY. 

Unsurpassed Accommodation for Saloon Passengers. 



EGYPT AND THE HOLY LAND. 
WEEKLY SAILINGS— PORT SAID, ISMAILIA, SUEZ, and CAIRO. 

SALOON— Port Said, £12, Return, £21 12s ; Ismailia, £13, Return, £23 Ss ; Suez, 

£14, Return, £25 4s. 
To Cairo and Back, £26 5s ; or Returning from Cairo via Marseilles and Rail to 

London, £27 6s ; or Liverpool to Cairo and Back by Steamer to Marseilles, 

only £21. 

MARSEILLES to LIVERPOOL and GLASGOW. 

Steamers of the "Anchor" Line leave Marseilles regularly for Liverpool 
and Glasgow. 

Cabin Fare to Liverpool, £11 ; to Glasgow, £11 by direct Steamer. 



Apply to HENDERSON BROTHERS, 17 Water Street, Liverpool ; 7 York 
Street, Manchester; 109 Commercial Street, Dundee ; 18 Leadenhall Street, E.C., 
London ; 35 Mount Stuart Square, Cardiff ; Gibraltar ; 7 Bowling Green, New 
York ; and 47 Union Street, Glasgow ; or to the 

Local Agent— W. POMPHREY, Post-Office Buildings. 



PIANOFORTES AND HARMONIUMS 

F m 9 A S- 38* 



d ££^9 
99 0-K-A.ZsTT STEEET, 
(Off St. George's Road,) 



^ <m &SS, m m> w im » 
Visits Wishaw and Neighbourhood for the purpose of Tuning 
and Regulating, and Treating with Parties for the Sale of 

Pianofortes and Harmoniums. 

03RD03E3RS LEET WIT3BE 

Mr POMPHREY, Agent, Wishaw; 

AND 

Mr RUSSELL, Post-Office, Newmains. 

Galedonia Oil Works. 

w. w. m M % In 

KYLE STREET, GLASGOW, 

Rosin Distiller and Manufacturer of all kinds of Colliery and 

Railway Waggon Greases ; Manufacturer of Oils 

specially for Collieries and Iron Works. 

COCCGCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCGC 

*^X SPECIALITIES. K^> 

Rosin Grease. Hot Neck and Cold Neck Greases. Wire Rope Oil. 

P.W. 650 " Imperial " Cylinder Oil. 

Filtered Cylinder Oil for High and Low Pressure. 

,, Paragon Engine Oil. 

Boiler Incrustation Preventive — will not injure the Metal. 



The LOflDOflDEflHY & BELFAST 

HAM, BUTTER, and EGG STORE, 



occcccccccccccccccococcococccc 

Daily Arrivals of the Finest Irish Butter 
and Eggs. 
Splendid Smoked and Rolled Hams. 

Best American and Cheddar Cheese. 

Come and Inspect the Stock. The Low Prices and First- 
Class Quality are unrivalled. 

oooooooenoooocoocooooooccooooc 



A. HABflRi 



Cabinetmakers, mpbolsterers, jfuneral IHnDer* 
takers, ant) General Ibonse ffnrnlsbers, 

KIRK R O AD, 

WISHAW. 



ESTABLISHED QUARTER OF A CENTURY. 



FUNERAL UNDERTAKING 

In all its Branches. Every requisite supplied on shortest 
notice ; attendance day and night. Charges moderate. 



Large Stock of Mourning Wreaths, at Lowest Prices. 



Best Cash Value in Town. Inspection Invited. 






Wholesale Dealer in Lamps, Globes, Wick, and 
General Hardware Goods, 

SIPIRIIISra-IMl^IKIE] IR 3 

199 MAIN STREET, W1SHAW. 

Seeds and Fishing Tackle. All Goods Carefully Packed. 



flillS Ilillllll 



i, 

CASH CLOTSIBR, 

WEST-EN D CROSS, W ISHAW. 

Every Description of Men's, Youths' and Boys' Clothing, 

Ready- Made or to Measure, at the Lowest 

Possible Cash Prices. 

gJmttkr ffjtokcm, 

BlErDPOSTER AND ADVERTISING 

Agent, 

Main Street; Wishaw. 

WIltMI BAXVBI1I, 

COAL MERCHANT. 
Depot : Wishaw Central Station. 
House: 242 Low Main Street. 

Orders Received at 6 Steivarton Street, 91 and 
15 Jj. Main Street. 



G70W&L 



CALEDONIAN ROAD, WISHAW. 

CHARLES NELSON, Proprietor. 



^oooooooociccoaocDooooDooa 



COMMERCIAL GENTLEMEN visiting Wishaw will find this 



%J 



place Comfortable and Convenient. 

DINNERS DAILY between ONE aud FOUR p.m. 

WINES OF THE FINEST BRAND. 



FAMILY DEPARTMENT. 

Families entrusting C. N. with their Orders, can depend on the 
Best Qualities of Wines, Whiskies, Brandies, Ales, etc., at 
Moderate Prices. 



C. W. penman, 

^OPractical Tailor and Clothier,0~9 

14 CALEDONIAN ROAD. 
W I S 3BE & W, 



H 



as always on hand a Large and Varied Stock of Genuine Scotch 
and English TWEED SUITINGS, Fancy TROUSERINGS, 
and OVERCOATINGS. 

LATEST DESIGNS, and 

FIRST-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. 
All Garments are made under personal supervision. 
Style and Perfect Fit Gnaranteed. 



[Established 1864.] 



Cabinetmaker & Upholsterer, 

stbWarton street, 

■vsr 1 s h: .a. "w% 

BEGS to draw the attention of parties furnishing to his Large 
Stock of 

Dining-Koom, Bedfoom, 

AND 

KITGHEJ1 fU^ITDHE. 

The Articles are all of the First Quality and Superior Workman- 
ship, and are offered at Lowest Trade Prices. 

CCCCCCCCCCCCGCCCCCCCCCCCOCCOCCCOOCCC 

He has always on Stock a Great Variety of 

BRUSSELS, TAPESTRY, 

and SCOTCH CARPETS, 

Rugs. Mats. Wool Beds. Mattresses. 

And other Furnishing Requisites at prices that defy competition. 

. Purchasers can have their Goods delivered free of Charge, 
within any reasonable distance. 

Removals Contracted for by Road or Rail. 



©E;@It©B TOVHQ'8 

Celebrated Cheap BOOT and SHOE SHOP, 

193 MAIN STREET, WISHAW, 

Where the eye is well pleased, the foot rightly fitted, and the purse 
carefully considered. 

ESTABLISHED TWENTY-SIX YEARS. 



JOBBER 3BE U I* Y 3S 3R_ 



£ <t 




M W 



n 



Excursion and Marriage Parties Supplied. Job and Post Horses, dec. 

It is the duty of every person to preserve his oiun life, likewise the 
lives of others ; therefore, don't drink water put out of its 
judgment by chemical operation, but drink 

S)aniel /nVjfarlane's 

^O GINGER BB1R.O-* 

Principal Ingredients — Boiled Water; Lump Sugar; Lump 
Ginger ; Cream of Tartar. Very wholesome. 



MEDICAL HERBALIST, 

Continues to Treat all Classes of Disease with Remedies 

gathered from Nature's Great Laboratory (the only 

Rational System of Treatment). 

A Choice Selection of Medicinal Herbs, Roots, Barks, and Flowers — 
British and Foreign — always on hand. 

Address— THE BOTANIC HALL, 170 Main Street, Wishaw. 




mettevvvese 



At "WISHAW PRESS" OFFICE 




Books. 




Funeral Letters. 


Pamphlets. 




Death Intimations. 


Catalogues. 




Memorial Cards. 


Reports. 




Club Rules. 


Testimonials. 


W. Pomphrey, 


Society 'Socials,' 


Circulars. 


A J ' 


Church Abstracts. 


Letter-headings. 


PRINTER, 


Voting-Papers. 


Memorandums. 


|o$t-|ffice |mUtin S S, 


Price-Lists. 


Invoices. 




Soiree Cards. 


Receipts. 


Main Street, 


Visiting Cards. 


Waggon Cards. 


WISHKW. 


Wedding Cards. 


Business Cards. 


Printing Works: 


Menu Cards. 


Luggage Labels. 


PARK ST. 


Programmes — 


Posters. 




Soiree, 


Handbills. 




Concert, 


Window Bills. 




Dance. 



EXECUTED WITH 



JACOB STIRLING & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Cash Grocers, Tea 
Merchants, Wine and Produce Importers, 

92 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



They who would fully enjoy the result of their labour 
should purchase with cash only. 



Bass' 





and 


c 


Allsopp's 


>-. 




U. 


ALE. 






<n 




i) 




n 




w 


Guinness', 


& 








7) 


Reid's, 


Tl 




a 


and 


X 




^G 


Invalid 


bo 


STOUT. 


'JB 






Bottled 


< 





on the 
Premises. 



CASH v CREDIT. 



WE conduct our business on 
Cash Principles, and there- 
by avoid the loss and additional 
expense incident to the antiquated 
store and credit system. We are 
thus enabled to supply our cus- 
tomers with goods of the best 
quality, at the smallest possible 
increase on cost price. 



TEA 



•V/ ] 



E give special attention to 
this department. Our Teas 
are bought in large quantities, 
and judiciously blended, and can- 
not be surpassed in RICHNESS 
and FLAVOUR at the respective 
prices. 

1/, 1/4, and 1/7 per Lb. 



Compare our prices and our quality 
with those of credit shops. 



Our 

Wines and 

Spirits 

for 

Medicinal 

Purposes 

cannot 

be 

Excelled. 

Specialty, 
"Jacob's" 

Blend 

Old Scotch 

Whisky. 

(Registered) 



" A penny saved is a penny gained." They who spend every 
penny well, are on the road to independence and wealth. 



SMITH'S PLACE 
NEWMAINS. 



BEAITCHES 
Central Warchoicse, 
16 Stewarton St., 
WISHAW. 



THE CROSS, 
ARMADALE. 



PHOTOGRAPHY. 



Charles Keid, 

YOUNG STREET, WISHAW, 

PEGS to intimate that he is prepared to execute 
PHOTOGRAPHS in all the Popular Styles, from 
Carte Size upwards. 

(Broups, JBuilfcings, Bntmals, etc., 

At a Distance, by Appointment. 

To avoid disappointment, the early part of the day should 
be chosen for Sitting, when convenient, especially in winter. 



ENLARGED PHOTOGRAPHS in CARBON, 
BROMIDE. OPAL. &c. 



(Qopies (Made from (Glass Pictures, 
(Qarte, and other Photographs. 



Picture Frames in Great Variety. 



MISSES A. & M. SMITH 

Wholesale and. Retail Ladies' Outfitters, 
133 fSDain Street, Misbaw. 



Large and Varied Stock of Ladies' and Children's 
Underclothing and Fancy Drapery. 



DRESSMAKER and DRAPER, 
100 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



(Baby (Linen and (Ladies' (EFnderclothing 
of every description. 

EROWNLIE & RUSSELL, 

PRACTICAL TAILORS 6- CLOTHIERS, 

<** 85 IAIN MEET, WISHAW, ** 

Have always on hand a Fresh well-selected Stock of 
Tweeds, Coatings, and Trouserings. 

Charges Moderate. Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed. 



GEORGE COCHRANE. 

Samifg (Grocer, Ze<x, (Brain, anb (proBiBton 

©tercgdnf, 

MAIN ST., WISHAW. 

All Goods Sold are Guaranteed of the Best Quality. 

TEAS are Unexcelled for Quality and Price. 



Thomas H. hambie's 

HAT, CAP, & HGSIEBY WAREHOUSE, 
j i Main Street; Wishaw. 



HATS. CAPS. UMBRELLAS. 

SCARFS. BRACES. COLLARS. 

GENT.'S UNDERCLOTHING, SHIRTS. &c. 

Always on hand a large Stock of above goods, which for variety, 
style, quality, and price, cannot be excelled at any other Establish- 
ment in town. 



Umbrellas ! 




Umbrellas ! 



Umbrellas! 



All kinds of Special Umbrellas 
Made, Re-covered, and Repaired on 
the shortest notice on the Premises. 



OBSERVE ADDRESS— 

MfflBIE'S, 31 main St., (flisbam. 

(N.B.— Established a Quarter of a Century.) 



iltSS CVBBIIr, 

General and Furnishing Ironmonger, 

«-0 20 KIRK ROA D,0^ 

e^ W I S H A W. Xe^ 

GEORGE M'CALLUM, 

hairdresser, 

<?^ 90 Main Street, ^> 



WHOLESALE 

Gbina, Glass, ano Eartbenware flfeercbant, 

*X^132 (Main (Street. Oj 



A Large Variety of Useful and Ornamental Goods, all of the Best 
Quality, kept in Stock. 

A Useful Assortment of Marriage Presents always on hand. 

PRICES MODERATE. 

Special Line in CHINA TEA SETS (40 Pieces), 
from 7s upwards. 

All Goods Delivered Free within a Ten Mile Radius. 



it. j. tvmi>i 

Stutterer <xrfi> Confectioner, 
16 MAIN STRUT, WISilW. 

Home and Foreign Fruits of all Kinds 
in their Seasons. 

ion mifenii, 

Wholesale Ironmonger, 

COLLIERY & ENGINEER'S FURNISHER, 

51 + MAIN 4 STREET, •:• WISHAW. 

-H- ESTABLISHED 46 YEARS. **- 

J p fa, m W) © in g 1 a s, 

7 KIRK ROAD, WISHAW, 

Begs respectfully to intimate to the Public of Wishaw and 
surrounding district, that he has always on hand a Fresh 
and Select Stock of 3800t5 anfc BhOCS for Ladies, 
Gentlemen, and Children, in great variety, suitable for all, 
at most reasonable prices. 

A good assortment of Ladies' Lacing, Buttoning, and 
Strap Shoes, in all the Newest Styles, from 3/6 upwards ; 
also, Evening Slippers in great variety. 

Repairs Promptly and Neatly Done on the Shortest Notice at 

JOHN DOUGLAS', Shoe Merchant 

7 KIRK ROAD, WISHAW. 



BUYERS SHOULD SEE THIS 

XARfiE AND MELL-aSSOMED STOCK 

AT THE 

LONDON HOUSE. 

To cope with the Steady Increase of Trade at this 
now Popular Establishment, the Premises have been 
greatly enlarged, and with improved Light and Space we 
are ahle to show Immense Stocks in all Departments. 



UJ 

I 



DRESS STUFFS. 

MILLINERY. MANTLES. 

W& BABY LINEN. 

A Special Department under the Management of 

Mrs Mitchell, and other Ladies. 
Large Staff of Milliners & Dressmakers on the Premises. 

VERY MODERATE CHARGES. 

GREAT STOCK OF 

HOUSEHOLD DRAPERY 

(All Qualities). 

Boys', Youths' and Gent.'s Ready-Made Cloth- 
ing. Also, a Splendid Stock of Tweeds and Cords 
made to Measure — a Good Fit Guaranteed, at Low 
Charges. 

Shirts, Collars, Ties, Braces, Belts, 
Trunks, and Travelling Bags- Football 
and Bicycle Outfits. 

HATS, CAPS, and FELTS. 

Every Style and Quality. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiii 

124, 126, 128 MAIN STREET, 
Sfi7~ X S ZE3I J± ^W. 

(Three Minutes' Walk from Central Station.) 

JOHN MITCHELL, PROPRIETOR. 



gunnel® Scoft, 

CASH GROCER & PROVISION MERCHANT, 

6 MAIN STREET (Cross), WISHAW. 

Finest Danish Butter from the Best Dairies. 

ANDREW THOMSON, 

BLACKSMITH. HORSE-SHOER, & 
GENERAL JOBBER, 

RUSSELL STREET, WISHAW. 

MINERS' TOOLS A SPECIALITY. 

For Good and Cheap BOOTS & SHOES, 

GO TO 

4=2 ZMZ^IUST STREET, 

Where there is a large and well-selected Stock to choose from. 

Repairs Promptly and Cheaply Executed, 

Cheapest Shop for the Poor 
Best Shop for the Rich, 
Right Shop for Everybody 

IS AT 

42 HIS STREET, WISHAW. 




FAMILY BUTCHER, 

150 MAIM STREET, 

W I S H A W. 



HENRY NIMMO, JR., 

ZBTXTOIHIIEIE,, 
10 KIRK ROAD, WISHAW. 

CORNED BEEF & PICKLED TONGUES. 



A MB 8 



fl) afl H dHl TO PS) 
_^ U |J B JEg Jfe 



Wine and Spirit Merchant, 

4.8 Main Street; Wis haw. 

Liquors of all kinds of the Best Quality. 



mm SAW MILLS, 



■w i s h: j± "W". 



JOHN THOMSON, 

WOOD MERCHANT, 
JOINER, and CARPENTER. 



JOINER'S SHOP- 

69 jStewarton Street, VY15HAW 



FUNERAL 


UNDERTAKING 


IN ALL ITS DEPARTMENTS. 


HEARSES, MOURNING COACHES, and 
every other Requisite, supplied on the Shortest 
Notice. 

Charges strictly moderate. 



JOINER AND CONTRACTOR, 
KIRK ROAD, CAMBUSNETHAN. 

Jobbings of all hinds -punctually attended to. 

F f IMiiiie^ & Co., 

OOACHBTJILDEES, 
MARSHALL STREET, WISHAW. 



Carriages of every description built to order from 
the Newest Designs. 



REPAIRS NEATLY EXECUTED. 



C 3BE .ft 3R. Gr 3S S M O DO 3E 3R A T E. 



FUNERAL UNDERTAKING. 



P. M'INNES & CO., 
/IDarsball Street, rasbaw. 



HEARSES, MOURNING COACHES, 
And every Requisite for Interments. 



/Iftustcal tuition. 

M rROBERT BOOTH, I.S.M . , 

(Organist and Choirmaster, Coltness Memorial Church,) 
PROFESSOR AND TEACHER OF 

Organ, Piano, Harmonium, 

Voice Culture, Solo Singing, 

Theory, Harmony, Composition, 
and Orchestration. 

OSDOOGCDOOCCCCiOCDCOCOOOCCCCOCO 

Candidates prepared for Local Examinations and Musical Diplomas. 
Upwards of 50 Certificates and Diplomas and several Prizes have 
been gained by Pupils. Compositions revised and corrected. 

ccccoccccccocooccococcccoccccc 

Local Representative of London College of Music. 
293 Cambusnethan, Wishaw. 

LONDON COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

(founded and incorporated for musical education, and for 

examination in theoretical and practical music. 
Local Examinations are held from time to time in the following 

branches: — (1) Theory of Music, (2) Singing, (3) Violin, 

Piano, and Harmonium Playing. 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS— DR. W.J. WESTBROOK (Mus. D., Cambridge 
Univ.), DR. C. G. VERRINDER (Mus. D. Cantuar.; Mus. B., Oxford Univ."), 
DR. ALLISON (Mus. D., Dublin Univ. ; Mus. B., Cambridge; Fellow Royal 
Academy of Music). 

Prospectuses and Full Information may be had from the 

Local Representative, 

Mr ROBERT BOOTH, Organist, 293 Cambusnethan, Wishaw. 

«-0 A, M. FISHER, O^ 

TEACHER OF MUSIC, 
M&IN STREET, W IS BE AW. 



PIANOFORTE AND HARMONIUM TAUGHT. 
QUADRILLE BAND OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENTS. 



o J 


" While there's tea, there's hope." — Pincro. 


bd 




154 MAIN STREET, 


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WISHAW. 


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ESTABLISHED 1882. 


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IWisses THOJWSOH & IW'JiEIIt, 

JVULLl^E^Y $g DRESSJrtAKlf/Q ESTABL-lSfJJrtEJ^T, 

55 firmin Street, Wisbaw. 

Straw and Felt Hats Cleaned, Dyed, and Altered. 
Feathers Cleaned, Dyed, and Curled on the Premises. 

Milliners and Dressmakers, 

129 MAIN STREET, 

"W ISHA ^TsT. 

FANCY WOOD L^EPOSITOl^Y. 

^S MfsSES^WATT. Oi 

Lace Goods, Caps, &c., Ladies' and Children's Underclothing, 
Baby Outfits, Children's Costumes, Pinafores, &c. Crewel and Stitch 
Goods, in Plush, Satin, &c. 
A large and varied assortment of Fancy Goods, suitable for Marriage 
and Birthday Presents ; also, Wall Texts. 

26 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



MRS ROBERT GOURLAY, 

FANCY BREAD AND BISCUIT BAKER, 

14 Stewarton Street, Wishaw. 

Marriage, Birthday, and Christening Cakes made to Order. 
Soirees and Pic-nics supplied. Dishes covered on the 
shortest notice. Hot Pies Daily. Hot Tea and Coffee. 

% & x» JEL o o M h 

PASTRY & CONFECTIONERY ESTABLISHMENT, 
161 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 

WORKS— PARK STREET. 



Soirees, Excursions, and Wedding Parties Supplied, 

PASTRY & CONFECTIONERY ESTABLISHMENT. 

JAMES FO~RBES, 

BAKER AND CONFECTIONER, 
Victoria Buildings, Wishaw. 

BRANCH AT CRAIGNEUK. 



Marriage and Christening Cakes Tastefully Ornamented. Soirees, 
Marriages, and Evening Parties Purveyed for. 

BOOTS! BOOTS!! BOOTS!!! 

Stranger — Can you tell me where I can get the Cheapest 
Boots ? 

Wishaw Man — You must be a stranger indeed if you do 
not know that M'LEES. 123 Main Street, has 
the largest Stock, sells Cheapest, makes to Measure, and 
repairs on the best system. Cash down and Low Profits. 

One Trial is only requested, for he %oho once tries him soons sees that for 
Neatness, Cheapness and Quality, none can surpass Al'Lees. 



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BURNS TAVERN, 

MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



Proprietor of the above Tavern, respectfully returns thanks 
to his numerous Customers for past favours, and assures 
them that no exertions will be awanting on his part to 
supply Liquors of the Finest Quality, and at the most 
reasonable terms. 



FAMILY ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



The WORLD'S POItYTEGHflIC, 

MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



->SS"«o«oO*8S<:- 



June, 1893. 



'E beg to thank our numerous Friends and Customers in 
Wishaw and neighbourhood for the very liberal support 
we have received since opening our New Premises in 
Main Street, and to assure them that every effort will be 

made in the future, as in the past, to induce all who appreciate Real 

Bargains to visit the 

e^X WORLD'S POLYTECHNIC, Kek* 

Main Street, Wishaw. 

Our aim is to provide New, Fresh, and Fashionable Goods at such 
Prices as bring them within the reach of all classes of the community. 

We are now offering Special' Value in PAPERHANGINGS— 
Fine Gold Papers at 1/6 per piece ; extra good. 

Sanitary Washable Paperhangings at i/- per piece ; worth 2/- and 2/8. 

Special Bargains in Ordinary Wall Papers, from 2d per piece upwards 

(beautiful colouring and design, far ahead of anything ever yet 

offered to the public). 

Largest Stock of Paperhangings in the District, over IOOO Patterns 

to select from. 

Special Sale for the Holidays — a large variety of Useful and 
Ornamental Novelties — 

Travelling Bags. Gordon and Gladstone Hampers. 
Iron Trunks. Ladies' Hand-Bags. 
Latest and Newest Styles in MAIL CARTS, only 14/6; 23 inch 
Rubber Tyred Wheels, Bent Hardwood Shafts, Wicker and Wood 
Bodies, 4^ inch Front Wheels, making it a very elegant and Easy 
running Carriage. 
Handsome BAMBOO CARS, from 19/6 upwards ; special value. 
Latest and Newest Styles in PERAMBULATORS and 
BASSINETTES, from 24/6 upwards ; special value. 

The Variety is irnrnense and the Prices exceeding!*) snjall. 

Visitors to the above will find it the Best and Cheapest place in 
Scotland for all kinds of Toys and Fancy Goods, useful and acceptable 
Presents of every description. Are you looking for something to 
amuse and instruct your Children ? — VISIT 

-m- The WORLDS POLYTECHNIC, *S+- 

HVL^IISr SO?., WI3HAW. 



MODERATE PRICES. 

SUBSTANTIAL GOODS. 

NEWEST FASHIONS. 

LARGE SELECTIONS. 



READY-MADES. 
Boys' & Youths' Suits, Overcoats, 

Trousers, &c. 
Ladies' Dress Stuffs in all the 

Fashionable Shades. 



Gent's Hats, Caps, Under- 
clothing, Umbrellas, 
&c. 
Latest Styles in Ladies' Capes 
and Jackets. 



WILLIAM SOMERVILLE, 

DRAPER, CLOTHIER, AND MiLLINER, 

Commercial Place, 15 Kirk Road, Wishaw, 



Waterproof Mantles, Shawls, 

Plaids, Skirts, &c. 

Ladies' Gloves, Hosiery, Stays, 

Umbrellas. 



Blankets, Flannels, Sheetings, 

Bed Mats and Napery. 

Newest Styles in 

Millinery. 



Gent.'s Suitings, Trouserings, and Overcoatings. 

Latest modes in Ladies' and Children's Millinery. 



FIRST-CLASS TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT. 

JAMBS lifll V, 

TAILOR AND CLOTHIER. 
41 MAIN STREET. 

Large and Stylish Range of Tweeds always in Stock. 

Special attention given to Liveries, Dress Suits, &c. 

First-Class Style, Fit, and Workmanship guaranteed. 
A trial respectfully solicited. 

THOMAS LITTLEJOHN, 

BrT'ii.MIX/Y" Gr3R.OC3E3R., 

TEA AND PROVISION MERCHANT, 

125 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 

Our Leading Tea — i/io per lb ; Rare Value. 

Groceries and Provisions of the Finest Quality. 
All Orders carefully attended to. 



STEWAET'S 

eOMMIlCIAL + HOTEL, 

C A M B U S JY E T H A JV. 

EVERY CONVENIENCE for COMMERCIAL GENTLEMEN. 

Dinners Daily from 12 till 3. 

Families Supplied with Liquors of the Best Quality. 

MIS QOLD, 

DRESSMAKER. 
WATSON'S LAND, CAMBUSNETHAN. 



Servants' Registry. 

&RTSOHT KWiE 

Grocer and Provision Merchant, 
121 CAMBUSNETHAN ST., 

W I S H A W. 

t>AVtt> WMfeW» 

G 3R O C 3B 3R. , 

o "v e :r, t o "w zn\ 



A. Melrose & Co.'s Edinburgh Teas in Packages. 
o 

Licensed to Retail Beer, Spirits, and Wine. 



@^T $ (§. c 0ocJwan& ; 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS. 

^/VllJSER/^L "¥/aTER ^/NUF/CTURERS, 8fC, 

GDBN I|OAD BAGTOI\Y, 

^WISHAW> 



SODA WATER. SPARKLING LEMONADE. 

POTASH WATER. AROMATIC GINGER ALE. 

SELTZER WATER. BELFAST GINGER ALE. 

HOT TOM BITTERS. GINGER BEER. 

These Waters are prepared with the greatest care from 
Pure Filtered Water, and for purity and deliciousness of 
flavour are incomparably superior to many of the much 
advertised, and consequently higher-priced /Erated Waters 
of other makers. 

Sample Orders for a Single Dozen or more of one kind 
or assorted will be supplied direct from the Works. 

Gazogenes, Gazogene Powders, Fruit Syrups, &c, &c, 



CYCLES. 




U 1 OLtib, 



A Well-Selected Stock of Newest and 
Best Patterns at Lowest Prices. 



Any Kind of Tyres Fitted as desired. 



Large Stock of Bells, Lamps, and 
Cycle Sundries. 



Machines Exchanged and Repaired at 
Lowest Prices. 

cocccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc 

ADDRESS- 

SOUTH & GO., 

IRONMONGERS & OYOLE AGENTS, 

49 MAIN STREET, 

WI8H.A W, 



Royal Hotel Livery Stables, 

MAIlNr STREET, WISBEifW. 

LANDAUS. BROUGHAMS. CABS. 

DOG-CARTS. WAGGONETTES. BRAKES. 

BUS, ETC. 
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS FOR EXCURSION PARTIES. 



HEARSES (with glass or solid panels) and 
MOURNING CARRIAGES. 



Saddle Horses. Stabling and Lock-up Coach Houses. 

TELEGRAMS AND LETTERS ADDRESSED 

THOMAS HAMILTON, Royal Hotel, 

OR VERBAL ORDERS LEFT AT 

J. & T. HAMILTON'S, East Cross, Wishaw, 

WILL RECEIVE IMMEDIATE ATTENTION. 
MODERATE CHARGES. 

WM. STRAIN, 

Jfamil^ (Srocer anfc TKHine fIDercbant, 
146 and 165 Main Street, 
^TsT ISHA "W. 

EMIGRATION TO AMERICA. 

flVASSENGERS Booked to all Parts of the States and 
llT Canada by the " Anchor " and other Lines 
To save disappointment and inconvenience, it is recom- 
mended that Tickets for the whole journey by ocean and 
rail be obtained before leaving home from the Local Agent, 
W. Pomphrey, Post-Office Buildings, Wishaw. 






9 KIRK ROAD, 

WISHAW. 



FINE SELECTION OF GENERAL AND FANCY 
DRAPERY GOODS. 
A LARGE STOCK OF BLACK DRESS GOODS-including 
Merinoes, Cashmeres, Fine and Heavy Serges, 
Coloured Merinoes and Cashmeres in all the New Shades. 

MILLINERY MILLIN^RyT^TuLINERY. 
Special attention is given to this Department. Only 
New and Fashionable Goods kept in Stock, in great variety, 
and at prices that can't be beat. Come and inspect our 
Stock before purchasing elsewhere. 

Special and Important to Cash Buyers, 

IF you wish to be supplied with the Best and most Fashionable 
DRAPERY GOODS at the Smallest Outlay of Money, make your 
Purchases at 



CASH DRAPERS and CLOTHIERS, 

47 MAIN STREET, WlSHAW, 

Where Goods of the most Reliable qualities only are Sold. Our 
Remarkable Cheap Prices are based on the Large Turn-over Rate. 
We are large Buyers for prompt Cash (not only for Wishaw, but also 
for Stirling and Berwick-on-Tweed) which enable us to Buy in the very 
Best Markets, and at the very Keenest Prices. 

We respectfully ask you to call and inspect our Stock : it will be to 
your advantage, and what is more Important, you will save money 
by Purchasing 1 at 

W. & A, JOHNSTON & CO., 

(Late Baird 8? Co.) 
47 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



WILLIAM J. .CAMPBELL, 

FAMILY GROCER & WINE MERCHANT, 

152 MAIN STREET & 2 PARK STREET, 



"W I S ZE3I J^. "W_ 



Orders called for and Delivered Daily per own Van. 
Letter Orders receive prompt attention. 



EIS8 A JL I, 2& H f 

CONFECTIONER, &c, 

4 IMl STREET, W1SHA' 

AGENT FOR MACNEE'S TEAS. 



W 



illlil MO&TOft, 

GODDSM1TH, [BWBDDE^, 

AND 

WATCHMAF[EI|, 
TINTO VIEW, CAMBUSNETHAN, 

(Established upwards of a Quarter of a Century,) 

Has always on hand a Select Stock of Ladies' and Gent.'s Gold and 
Silver Watches, Eight-day Clocks, New Patterns of American Clocks, 
Timepieces and Barometsrs, Gold, Silver, and Plated Alberts and 
Seals, Rings, Lockets, Scarf Pins, Studs, Brooches, Earrings, Necklets, 
Bangles and Bracelets, Spectacles and Eye Glasses, &c, &c. , all of 
Best Quality, and at Lowest Prices. 



All descriptions of Watches, Clocks, Jewellery, and Musical 

Instruments, Carefully Repaired on the Premises, 

at Moderate Charges, and at the 

Shortest Notice, 



JOHN SMITH, 

General and Furnishing Irongmonger, 

38 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 

Has always in Stock a Splendid Selection of 

GRATES, FENDERS, FIRE-IRONS, 

ASH PANS, WASHING TUBS, 

WRINGERS. 

PAINTS, OILS, COLOURS, BRUSHES, 

TRUNKS, MINERS' SHOVELS, 

&c, &c. 

ALL GOODS OF FIRST-CLASS QUALITY, AND AT 
WHOLESALE PRICES. 



INSPECTION INVITED. 

E A. B 1 N N I E, 

W3SST-3£I]NrX> BOOT AND S3BE03B 
WA3R3SBEOUS3S, 

182 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 



BOOTS MADE TO MEASURE AT LOWEST RATES. 
REPAIRS PUNCTUALLY ATTENDED TO. 



1, NAISHIYH, 

Fishmonger and Dealer in Poultry and Pigeons, 

186 MAIN STREET, 
SfT X S S .A. "W. 



BONE SPECIALIST. 

T. R. GILCHRIST, Wishaw, 

CONSULTS — Lanark, Victoria Hotel, Mondays, 10.30 
till 1.30; Glasgow, Old Waverley Hotel, 185 
Buchanan Street, Wednesdays, 11.30 till 3; Edinburgh, 
Bridge Hotel, Princes Street, first and alternate Fridays, 
same hours. At Home Saturday. 

Rheumatism and Sciatica successfully treated. 

Established over a Quarter of a Century. 



WISHAW 

Seryanls'HegisIry Office. 

MRS FORSYTH, 

63 MAIN STREET, WISHAW. 

-%XT m €&> J_ BOWI]B g 

DYERS, CLEANERS, AND CARPET BEATERS, 
Clyde Dye Works, Bridgeton, Glasgow. 

DYEING AND CLEANING in all its Branches. Superior work- 
manship and moderate charges. 

CARPET BEATING by Steam Power Machinery, combined with 
our celebrated Compressed Air Process (protected by Royal Letters 
Patent), surpasses all other methods of extracting dast from Car- 
pets. Absolute safety guaranteed. Prices from id per square yd. 

CARPET CLEANING AND RENOVATING. This invaluable 
process still continues to meet with the unqualified approval of our 
numerous customers. Prices, from 3d per lineal yard. 

NETTOYAGE A SEC (French, or Dry Cleaning Process). A 
Specialty for all classes of goods. 

Orders left with our Agents in Wishaw and District, as undernoted, 
will receive prompt and careful attention : — 

Mr JOHN LITTLEJOHN, Draper and Clothier, 194 MAIN ST., WISHAW. 

Mr R. B. FRASER, Draper, 20 MAIN ST., WISHAW. 

Miss GIBB. Milliner, NEWMAINS. 

Mr GEORGE CLARK, Draper, CAM BUSNETHAN. 

Mrs SMITH, CAMBUSNETHAN. TELEPHONE No. 2506 



^EY'S 





POMPHREY, Printer and Stationer, Post- 
Office Buildings, Main Street, Wishaw, 
respectfully invites the attention of the Reading Public to 
the Library he has opened in Wishaw, on the system of 
Small Weekly Payments The large amount of favour with 
which the venture has been attended, indicates that the 
Library is supplying a public want, and every effort will be 
made to maintain and increase its popularity by adding new 
works of merit, immediately on publication, to the already 
choice selection of Books presently in circulation. All the 
Volumes are placed in a separate room, specially fitted up, 
and carefully arranged to suit the convenience of Subscribers. 



o-O TERMS. O^ 
Entrance Fee. — All Subscribers on enrolment are 
charged an Entrance Fee of One Shilling, which is returned 
on Subscription ceasing. 

Charge for Reading. — All Ordinary Books id and 
2d per Week , New Books, 3d and 4d per Week. When a 
Book chargeable at the rate of 2d or more per week is kept 
out for only half a week, half the weekly rate only is charged. 



p © if & t p m » i * a, 

(SUCCESSOR 7"<7 /. e£ T. HAMILTON,) 

CHOP MANUFACTURER AND GRAIN MERCHANT, 

CAMPBELL STREET, WIS HAW. 

J. & T. Hamilton have pleasure in introducing Donald Keith as 
their successor, and hope he will receive a share of public patronage. 



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HAMILTON'S POPULAR CHOP MiXTURE. 

BY STEAM PROCESS (Protected). 



50NALD KEITH has been induced, in consequence 
of the rapid increase in the consumption of this 
popular Horse Diet, to erect new appliances at his Stores 
— the introduction of which, he has pleasure in stating, 
will materially enhance the general excellence of the 
Chop, and enable him to supply the Trade with the 
utmost despatch. Complaints are frequently made about 
the large Percentage of Dust invariably found in 
Chop mixed on Floors ; and the Mixture not being 
subsequenty sifted or screened, the ingredients are more 
or less adulterated, and consequently highly injurious 
to the animal. 

Donald Keith's Improved Machinery obviates this 
Seriates Grievance. By his method the compounds are 
accurately proportioned on leaving the Stock Gainels, 
whence they are conveyed by a series of Elevators to the 
New Rotary Mixer and Sifter, by which Machine every 
ingredient foreign to the Chop is effectually expelled ; 
and the injurious effects which necessarily attend the 
objectionable and crude process of Shovel-Mixing are 
entirely overcome. The superiority of this Chop Mixture 
can only be fully realised by an impartial experiment ; 
and, as D. K. guarantees the Mixture to comprise Grains 
of First Quality only, and freed from all impurities by 
the inventions aforesaid, he now respectfully invites the 
most exacting scrutiny and comparison. D. K. would 
remind Coalmasters, Job-Masters, and Horse-Feeders 
generally, who are in quest of a thorougly economical 
Horse-Diet, to use exclusively this 

POPULAR CHOP MIXTURE. 



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DOIT ALD IKZIEIT ZE3I, 

Chop Manufacturer and Merchant, 
C-AuIiyillE'IBJEILIL. STREET, WISHAW. 



— — - . — . -, r _ — 

ESTABLISHED 1824. 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL 

INSURANCE COMPANY. 

HEAD OFFICE— 35 St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 

Capital, - - - £6*000,000 1 Anncai Income, - - £850*000 
Invested Funds, - £3,!)fiS,oo'o | Life Policies in Force, £10,000,000 

THOSE WHO CONTEMPLATE EFFECTING A 

LIFE ASSURANCE 

ARE INVITED to EXAMINE thr COMPANY'S NEW PROSPECTUS and RATES. 

EARLY BONUS POLICIES, 

ORDINARY WHOLE-LIFE. 

At the last two Divisions of Profits in 1884 and 1889, Policies under the above 

SCHEME RECEIVED A BONUS ADDITION OF £2 PER CENT, 
for each year since they began to rank. Such Policies, subject to he Regulations 
in the Prospectus, are WORLD. WIDE, INDISPUTABLE, & NONFORFEITABLE. 
CLAIMS PAID IMMEDIATELY ON PROOF OP DEATH AND TITLE. 

DIRECTORS— GLASGOW BRANCH. 



JOHN AFFLECK, Esq. 
W. 6. BLACKIE, Esq. 
JOHN COWAN, Esq. 
W. FINLAYSON, Esq. 

Resident Secretary— -HENRY G. ANDREWES 



THOMAS MASON, Esq. 
J. B. WINGATE, Esq. 
ALEXANDER WATT, Esq. 



SHORT PERIOD INSURANCES, 

FOR PARTNERSHIP AND OTHER BUSINESS ARRANGEMENTS. 

Annual Premium for Assuring 6100 payable at deith, if that shall happen within 

One, Five, or Seven Years. 



Age. 


One Year. 


Five Yen is. 


Seven Years. 


25 


£0 1<> 6 


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FIRE INSURANCE. 

Almost all descriptions of property insured on the most favourable conditions. 

Inspections made and rates Quoted free of charge. 

SETTLEMENT OF LOSSES PROMPT AND LIBERAL. 

GLASGOW BRANCH OFFICE— 150 WEST GEORGE ST. 

Prospeetvues and every information ran be had at the Glasgow Office, err at 

any a/the Agencie* of thr Company. 

AGENTS AT WISHA W— JAMES LOGAN. Coltness Estate Office ; 
JOHN MTNTYRE, The Distillery; ALEX. T POMPHREY, 
Post-Office Buildings ; JAMES TAIT, Civil Engineer. 



Telegrams: Pomphrey, Wishaw. 
Telephone No. 11. 




OFFICE OF THE • 

TOsbaw press 

AND 

ADVERTISER. 

(Establishc.i iSyo.) 



'ANCHOR' LINE 
AGENCY. 



Circulating Uibrary. 



Fire an 1 Life 
Insurance Agency. 



* 9 

PRINTER, STKTIOjqER, k jqEWS-MEjqT, 

POST-OFFICE BUILDINGS, 

*Jo* "W I S T3L .A. -W. 



FASHIONABLE AND MERCANTILE STATIONERY 
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

f/otepaper Stamped from Die, Plain or in Colours. 



ALBUMS, POCKET-BO.QKS, PURSES, PICTURE FRAMES. 

A Good Selection of Family, Pew, and Pocket 
BIBLES and TESTAMENTS. 

All kinds of Time Books, Day Books, Ledgers, Letter 
Books, on hand and to order. 

Newspapers and Weekly and Monthly Periodicals supplied. 



ADVERTISEMENTS RECEIVED FOR ALL THE DAILY AND 
WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS. 



BOOKBINDING. Books and Magazines Bound in 
every style. Parcels sent for to any address. 



t-6-r 



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